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Business Economics Degree Program

Online Economics Degree - Business Economics Degree Program Program OverviewProgram DetailsWhy Choose Franklin
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Major Area Course Descriptions

ECON 321 - INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS

This course provides a further examination of profit maximizing strategies by firms and individuals. Evaluation of consumer behavior, firms? production decisions, and market power are at the core of the analysis. Special attention is given to the asymmetric information considerations, game theory, and externalities.

ECON 322 - INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS

This course examines the differences between the economy in the short run and in the long run. A number of macroeconomic models are considered, and the results are used to conduct macroeconomic policy discussion on stabilization policies and government debt.

ECON 340 - MONEY,BANKING & FINANCIAL MARKETS

This course provides an overview of the financial system. The roles of money, financial intermediaries, financial markets, and central banks are discussed in the context of global economy.

ECON 420 - FORECASTING

This course provides a hands-on experience for creating working econometric models to forecast business activities, including revenues, costs, and profits. Trends, seasonal and cyclical fluctuations, as well as error term dynamics, are analyzed.

ECON 450 - HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT

This course provides a broad introduction to the development of economic thought through time. The ideas and concepts are considered in their historical perspective. Contributions by leading economists, emergence of a variety of schools of economic thought, their relevance to the current economic problems constitute the core of the analysis.

ECON 495 - SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC GROWTH

This course serves as a summary of the theoretical perspectives and techniques? application for developing a cohesive model of a sustainable economy. Factors affecting economic growth are discussed. Issues related to depleting resources, role of innovation, and ways for sustainable development are at the core of the analysis. The roles of government and inter-government institutions are evaluated. The final project introduces an idea for an increased sustainability effort and is expected to provide a measurable impact.

Major Electives Course Descriptions

ACCT 310 - INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I

The first of two in-depth financial accounting courses. Theory, the conceptual framework, development of generally accepted accounting principles, and applications are stressed. Topics include the income statement, the statement of cash flows and the balance sheet, specifically asset accounts.

ACCT 320 - INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II

The second of two in-depth financial accounting courses. Theory, concepts and applications are stressed. Topics include time value of money, current and non-current liabilities, leases, deferred taxes, retirement benefits, stockholders? equity, earning per share, accounting changes and errors, and statement of cash flows.

BSAD 320 - QUANTITATIVE & QUALITATIVE METHODS FORyDECISION MAKING

This course focuses on the development of individual and team decision-making and problem solving skills. Real world domestic and global issues will be analyzed, diagnosed, and evaluated through the application of a variety of quantitative and qualitative tools and techniques used to arrive at effective decisions and solutions.

BSAD 460 - BUSINESS ETHICS FOR LEADERS

This course focuses on the application and evaluation of scholarly articles, case studies, and real-life ethical dilemmas using an ethical decision-making model. Students will evaluate personal value systems; individual, leadership driven, organizational, and community ethical issues; and the social responsibilities of global organizations. The course will culminate in an in-depth analysis of a real-life ethical dilemma based on an authentic organization.

BSAD 476 - GLOBAL BUSINESS ISSUES

This course focuses on global economic integration and emerging market economies and the effects these trends have on both service and manufacturing industries in the short- and long-term. Other global business issues will include: the European Union (EU), North American Free Trade Association (NAFTA), and the World Trade Organization (WTO); environmental considerations in business operations; the influences of the political and legal environment on markets; the strategies for business entry into a global market; and the development of leadership talent in a global setting.

COMM 315 - COMMUNICATION ETHICS

This course examines the strategies involved in effective, ethical communication in professional contexts. Students examine principles of ethical organizational communication and the temporal/cultural/social forces behind those principles, as well as apply reasoning and critical thinking in individual and group assignments. Comparing values and perspectives from diverse cultures, students will respond to cases in an intercultural professional environment.

COMM 321 - ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION

The course examines the role of communication in organizations. Students will learn the major theories of organizational communication, identifying and defining primary concepts, and applying them to discussions of real-world situations. The role of technology, corporate culture, leadership, teamwork, ethics, and diversity in communication is examined. Effective communication in global organizations and critiques of organization communication systems and structures are also presented.

ECON 410 - ECONOMICS INTERNSHIP

This course provides qualified students with the opportunity to receive academic credit for supervised professional training and experience in an actual work environment, or for participation in the Students In Free Enterprise (SIFE). Internship involves a Learning Contract, outlining the student?s responsibilities and expectations. Contact with the faculty representative is required. Participation cannot be guaranteed for all applicants.

ECON 480 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS

A variable content classroom course in Economics in which students pursue topics or subjects of current interest that are not part of the regular curriculum. A specific course description will be published online in the Course Schedule for the trimester the course is offered.

ECON 499 - INDPNDENT ST-ECON

Independent studies courses allow students in good academic standing to pursue learning in areas not covered by the regular curriculum or to extend study in areas presently taught. Study is under faculty supervision and graded on either a Pass/No Credit or a letter grade basis. (See the "Independent Studies" section of the Academic Bulletin for more details.)

ENTR 395 - FOUNDATIONS OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Foundations of Entrepreneurship is an introductory course that examines the theory, practice, and tools of entrepreneurship. Various entrepreneurship structures and how such structures result in different unique pathways to success are explored. Students will focus on the importance of developing an entrepreneurial mindset as they assess their individual values and determine their affinity for entrepreneurial thinking, while also reviewing the risks and rewards of entrepreneurial businesses in the context of their chosen entrepreneurial philosophy. Finally, students will identify and evaluate opportunities for new ventures, and consider a strategic approach for successful business plan development.

FINA 403 - ADVANCED FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

An introduction to advanced concepts and methods of financial management. Topics include risk and return, asset evaluation, capital budgeting, capital structure, business financial planning and working capital management.

WRIT 320 - BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WRITING

This is an advanced composition course for juniors and seniors which focuses on business, technical and professional writing. Skills taught include audience analysis; research methods; questionnaire, interview and survey techniques; letters; data collection, interpretation and documentation; graphic illustration; and composition of reports in special formats. Instruction and practice are provided in writing various types of reports such as r‚sum‚s, proposals, summaries, research reports and instructions for user manuals, and in presenting committee and oral reports. Students will be encouraged to relate course materials to their major programs and their workplaces.

The above list of courses only represents a portion of the courses required for a bachelor's degree. View the bachelor's degree full curriculum.

Additional Course Descriptions

Business Core

Take a detailed look at courses that build upon your general education knowledge, and help to prepare you for major area coursework.

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