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Business Economics Degree Program

Online Economics Degree - Business Economics Degree Program Program OverviewProgram DetailsWhy Choose Franklin
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Business Economics - Subsequent Bachelor of Science Degree

Looking to earn an additional bachelor’s degree? This degree is specifically designed for students who have already completed a bachelor's degree or higher.

Prerequisite Competencies

  • ECON 220 - INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS (4)

    ECON 220

    INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS

    Course Description

    An introduction to economic theory involving the basic underlying causes and principles of the operation of an economic system. Emphasis is placed on studying the economy as a whole. Issues of inflation, unemployment, taxation, business cycles and growth are discussed in the context of the global economic system.
  • MATH 215 - STATISTICAL CONCEPTS (4)

    MATH 215

    STATISTICAL CONCEPTS

    Course Description

    This course introduces the student to statistics with business applications. The course covers both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics included are: measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion; graphical displays of data; linear regression; basic probability concepts; binomial and normal probability distributions; confidence intervals; and hypothesis testing. These topics will be covered using a basic knowledge of algebra and Microsoft Excel.
  • PF 321 - LEARNING STRATEGIES (2)

    PF 321

    LEARNING STRATEGIES

    Course Description

    This course prepares students to be successful lifelong learners both academically and in their chosen careers. Franklin courses require a high level of self-directed learning and focus on skills required in the workplace and the classroom that are easily transferable between the two environments. The course includes strategies for advancing communication skills, including the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments. The assignments and activities in the course are created to closely simulate teamwork found in the workplace.

Business Core (28 hours)

  • ACCT 215 - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (4)

    ACCT 215

    FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

    Course Description

    An introduction to accounting emphasizing how general purpose financial statements communicate information about the business corporation?s performance and position for users external to management. Approximately one third of the course emphasizes how the accountant processes and presents the information and includes exposure to recording transactions, adjusting balances and preparing financial statements for service and merchandise firms according to established rules and procedures. The balance of the course examines major elements of the statements such as cash, receivables, inventory, long?lived assets, depreciation, payroll, bonds, and other liabilities and stocks. Concepts of this course are applied to Managerial Accounting (ACCT 225). Students are advised to avoid any time lapse between these courses.
  • ACCT 225 - MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (4)

    ACCT 225

    MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING

    Course Description

    The study of management accounting for internal reporting and decision-making. The course introduces a business-management approach to the development and use of accounting information. Major topics include cost behavior, cost analysis, profit planning and control measures. Accounting for decentralized operations, capital budgeting decisions, and ethical challenges in managerial accounting are also covered.
  • BSAD 220 - BUSINESS LAW (4)

    BSAD 220

    BUSINESS LAW

    Course Description

    A study of the everyday legal problems encountered in business with emphasis on the areas of legal procedure, contracts, agency, employment law, business organizations and torts, with cases relating to these and other areas.
  • ECON 210 - INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS (4)

    ECON 210

    INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS

    Course Description

    An introduction to economic theory involving the examination of how decision making by firms and individuals is shaped by economic forces. Emphasis is placed on demand, supply, market equilibrium analysis, and basic market structure models. The invisible hand as the driving force for economic decisions as well as market externalities are discussed. The class concentrates on providing a balanced approach to studying economic agents' behavior and the global implications and outcomes.
  • FINA 301 - PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE (4)

    FINA 301

    PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE

    Course Description

    This course is designed to survey the field of finance and provide the foundation for more advanced finance coursework. Topics include sources of business and financial information, financial statement analysis, the time value of money, the nature and measurement of risk, financial institutions, investments and corporate finance.
  • MGMT 312 - PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (4)

    MGMT 312

    PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT

    Course Description

    This course explores the basic concepts and processes of management. Students will explore the functional roles and processes of planning, leading, organizing, and controlling comprising the manager role. Students develop skills related to the manager function and required in today's competitive environment.
  • MKTG 300 - MARKETING (4)

    MKTG 300

    MARKETING

    Course Description

    A general course in marketing theory and methods. Among topics discussed are the importance of marketing, the interrelationship of the different phases of marketing, the differences between the marketing of goods and services, wholesaling, retailing, pricing strategies, analysis of markets, and distribution.

Major Area (24 hours)

  • ECON 321 - INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS (4)

    ECON 321

    INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS

    Course Description

    This course provides a further examination of profit maximizing strategies by firms and individuals. Evaluation of consumer behavior, firms? production decisions, and market power are at the core of the analysis. Special attention is given to the asymmetric information considerations, game theory, and externalities.
  • ECON 322 - INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS (4)

    ECON 322

    INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS

    Course Description

    This course examines the differences between the economy in the short run and in the long run. A number of macroeconomic models are considered, and the results are used to conduct macroeconomic policy discussion on stabilization policies and government debt.
  • ECON 340 - MONEY,BANKING & FINANCIAL MARKETS (4)

    ECON 340

    MONEY,BANKING & FINANCIAL MARKETS

    Course Description

    This course provides an overview of the financial system. The roles of money, financial intermediaries, financial markets, and central banks are discussed in the context of global economy.
  • ECON 420 - FORECASTING (4)

    ECON 420

    FORECASTING

    Course Description

    This course provides a hands-on experience for creating working econometric models to forecast business activities, including revenues, costs, and profits. Trends, seasonal and cyclical fluctuations, as well as error term dynamics, are analyzed.
  • ECON 450 - HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT (4)

    ECON 450

    HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT

    Course Description

    This course provides a broad introduction to the development of economic thought through time. The ideas and concepts are considered in their historical perspective. Contributions by leading economists, emergence of a variety of schools of economic thought, their relevance to the current economic problems constitute the core of the analysis.
  • ECON 495 - SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC GROWTH (4)

    ECON 495

    SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC GROWTH

    Course Description

    This course serves as a summary of the theoretical perspectives and techniques? application for developing a cohesive model of a sustainable economy. Factors affecting economic growth are discussed. Issues related to depleting resources, role of innovation, and ways for sustainable development are at the core of the analysis. The roles of government and inter-government institutions are evaluated. The final project introduces an idea for an increased sustainability effort and is expected to provide a measurable impact.

Major Electives (12 hours)

Select 12 hours from:

  • ACCT 310 - INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I (4)

    ACCT 310

    INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I

    Course Description

    The first of two in-depth financial accounting courses. Theory, the conceptual framework, development of generally accepted accounting principles, and applications are stressed. Topics include the income statement, the statement of cash flows and the balance sheet, specifically asset accounts.
  • ACCT 320 - INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II (4)

    ACCT 320

    INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II

    Course Description

    The second of two in-depth financial accounting courses. Theory, concepts and applications are stressed. Topics include time value of money, current and non-current liabilities, leases, deferred taxes, retirement benefits, stockholders? equity, earning per share, accounting changes and errors, and statement of cash flows.
  • BSAD 320 - QUANTITATIVE & QUALITATIVE METHODS FORyDECISION MAKING (4)

    BSAD 320

    QUANTITATIVE & QUALITATIVE METHODS FORyDECISION MAKING

    Course Description

    This course focuses on the development of individual and team decision-making and problem solving skills. Real world domestic and global issues will be analyzed, diagnosed, and evaluated through the application of a variety of quantitative and qualitative tools and techniques used to arrive at effective decisions and solutions.
  • BSAD 460 - BUSINESS ETHICS FOR LEADERS (4)

    BSAD 460

    BUSINESS ETHICS FOR LEADERS

    Course Description

    This course focuses on the application and evaluation of scholarly articles, case studies, and real-life ethical dilemmas using an ethical decision-making model. Students will evaluate personal value systems; individual, leadership driven, organizational, and community ethical issues; and the social responsibilities of global organizations. The course will culminate in an in-depth analysis of a real-life ethical dilemma based on an authentic organization.
  • BSAD 476 - GLOBAL BUSINESS ISSUES (4)

    BSAD 476

    GLOBAL BUSINESS ISSUES

    Course Description

    This course focuses on global economic integration and emerging market economies and the effects these trends have on both service and manufacturing industries in the short- and long-term. Other global business issues will include: the European Union (EU), North American Free Trade Association (NAFTA), and the World Trade Organization (WTO); environmental considerations in business operations; the influences of the political and legal environment on markets; the strategies for business entry into a global market; and the development of leadership talent in a global setting.
  • COMM 315 - COMMUNICATION ETHICS (4)

    COMM 315

    COMMUNICATION ETHICS

    Course Description

    This course examines the strategies involved in effective, ethical communication in professional contexts. Students examine principles of ethical organizational communication and the temporal/cultural/social forces behind those principles, as well as apply reasoning and critical thinking in individual and group assignments. Comparing values and perspectives from diverse cultures, students will respond to cases in an intercultural professional environment.
  • COMM 321 - ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION (4)

    COMM 321

    ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION

    Course Description

    The course examines the role of communication in organizations. Students will learn the major theories of organizational communication, identifying and defining primary concepts, and applying them to discussions of real-world situations. The role of technology, corporate culture, leadership, teamwork, ethics, and diversity in communication is examined. Effective communication in global organizations and critiques of organization communication systems and structures are also presented.
  • ECON 410 - ECONOMICS INTERNSHIP (1 - 4)

    ECON 410

    ECONOMICS INTERNSHIP

    Course Description

    This course provides qualified students with the opportunity to receive academic credit for supervised professional training and experience in an actual work environment, or for participation in the Students In Free Enterprise (SIFE). Internship involves a Learning Contract, outlining the student?s responsibilities and expectations. Contact with the faculty representative is required. Participation cannot be guaranteed for all applicants.
  • ECON 480 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS (1 - 4)

    ECON 480

    SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS

    Course Description

    A variable content classroom course in Economics in which students pursue topics or subjects of current interest that are not part of the regular curriculum. A specific course description will be published online in the Course Schedule for the trimester the course is offered.
  • ECON 499 - INDPNDENT ST-ECON (1 - 4)

    ECON 499

    INDPNDENT ST-ECON

    Course Description

    Independent studies courses allow students in good academic standing to pursue learning in areas not covered by the regular curriculum or to extend study in areas presently taught. Study is under faculty supervision and graded on either a Pass/No Credit or a letter grade basis. (See the "Independent Studies" section of the Academic Bulletin for more details.)
  • ENTR 395 - FOUNDATIONS OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP (4)

    ENTR 395

    FOUNDATIONS OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP

    Course Description

    Foundations of Entrepreneurship is an introductory course that examines the theory, practice, and tools of entrepreneurship. Various entrepreneurship structures and how such structures result in different unique pathways to success are explored. Students will focus on the importance of developing an entrepreneurial mindset as they assess their individual values and determine their affinity for entrepreneurial thinking, while also reviewing the risks and rewards of entrepreneurial businesses in the context of their chosen entrepreneurial philosophy. Finally, students will identify and evaluate opportunities for new ventures, and consider a strategic approach for successful business plan development.
  • FINA 403 - ADVANCED FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (4)

    FINA 403

    ADVANCED FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

    Course Description

    An introduction to advanced concepts and methods of financial management. Topics include risk and return, asset evaluation, capital budgeting, capital structure, business financial planning and working capital management.
  • WRIT 320 - BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WRITING (4)

    WRIT 320

    BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WRITING

    Course Description

    This is an advanced composition course for juniors and seniors which focuses on business, technical and professional writing. Skills taught include audience analysis; research methods; questionnaire, interview and survey techniques; letters; data collection, interpretation and documentation; graphic illustration; and composition of reports in special formats. Instruction and practice are provided in writing various types of reports such as r‚sum‚s, proposals, summaries, research reports and instructions for user manuals, and in presenting committee and oral reports. Students will be encouraged to relate course materials to their major programs and their workplaces.

Additional Requirements

Each candidate for a subsequent degree must successfully complete in residence at Franklin University a minimum of 30 credit hours of 200 level courses or above, of which a minimum of 16 credit hours must be in major area courses at the 300 or 400 level. If the student is a previous Franklin bachelor of science degree graduate, the 30 credits must be earned after the first Franklin B.S. degree was awarded. If the required courses for a subsequent degree total less than 30 credit hours, the student may take Free Elective courses to achieve residency. Either PF 121 or PF 321 must be taken prior to the first BLF course, or it may be taken concurrently with the first 15-week BLF course. Students also must meet the University algebra competency requirement

A minimum GPA of 2.25 is required in the major area, and each major area course must be completed with a grade of “C” or better to count toward degree requirements.

Please see the Academic Bulletin for the complete list of degree and residency requirements.

Additional Curriculum

Business Economics - Bachelor of Science Degree

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