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Criminal Justice Administration Degree Program

Criminal Justice Degree Online - Criminal Justice Administration Program Program OverviewProgram DetailsWhy Choose Franklin
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Criminal Justice Administration - Bachelor of Science Degree

124 Semester Hours

Fundamental General Education Core (24 hours)

All courses must be at the 100 or 200 level

English Composition

Choose a minimum of 3 semester hours from:

  • WRIT 120 - COLLEGE WRITING (4)

    WRIT 120

    COLLEGE WRITING

    Course Description

    In this course, students acquire the writing competence necessary for conducting and presenting research. A variety of assignments, beginning with personal reflections, build upon one another, as students develop ideas that respond to, critique, and synthesize the positions of others. Students systematize and organize knowledge in ways that will help them in all of their courses. The course also emphasizes the elements of good writing style, appropriate grammar and mechanics, clarity of language, and logical and cohesive development. It culminates in submission of a documented research paper.
Mathematics

Choose a minimum of three semester hours from:

  • MATH 160 - COLLEGE ALGEBRA (4)

    MATH 160

    COLLEGE ALGEBRA

    Course Description

    This course is designed to prepare students for Applied Calculus and Discrete Mathematics and to provide the mathematical background needed for the analytic reasoning used in other courses. Topics include functions and their graphs, including exponential and logarithmic functions; complex numbers; systems of equations and inequalities; matrices; basic principles of counting and probability; and other selected topics.
  • MATH 180 - APPLIED CALCULUS (4)

    MATH 180

    APPLIED CALCULUS

    Course Description

    This course is designed to meet the needs of the Computer Science Program. Topics include limits, the derivative, rules for differentiation, graphing strategy, optimization problems, differentials, implicit differentiation, related rates, exponential and logarithmic functions, antiderivatives, definite integrals, areas, and methods of integration. Applications are emphasized.
  • MATH 210 - FINITE MATHEMATICS (4)

    MATH 210

    FINITE MATHEMATICS

    Course Description

    This course includes such topics as matrices, solutions of simultaneous linear equations using matrix methods, graphic and simplex solutions to linear programming problems, set theory, counting problems (including permutations and combinations), probability theory (including Bayes' theorem), Markov chains, and the mathematics of finance. Game theory may be discussed if time permits. Applications in business, economics, and management are emphasized.
  • MATH 215 - STATISTICAL CONCEPTS (4)

    MATH 215

    STATISTICAL CONCEPTS

    Course Description

    This course introduces the student to statistics with business applications. The course covers both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics included are: measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion; graphical displays of data; linear regression; basic probability concepts; binomial and normal probability distributions; confidence intervals; and hypothesis testing. These topics will be covered using a basic knowledge of algebra and Microsoft Excel.
  • MATH 220 - BUSINESS CALCULUS (4)

    MATH 220

    BUSINESS CALCULUS

    Course Description

    This course may not be taken by students who previously received calculus credit. Topics include limits, the derivative, rules for differentiation, graphing strategy, optimization problems, differentials, implicit differentiation, related rates, exponential and logarithmic functions, antiderivatives, definite integrals, areas, and methods of integration. Applications in business, economics, and management are emphasized. This course should be taken as soon as possible after acquiring the necessary algebra skills and concepts, preferably within the first 60 hours of any degree program.
Sciences

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

  • SCIE 101 - INTRO TO CHEMISTRY (4)

    SCIE 101

    INTRO TO CHEMISTRY

    Course Description

    SCIE 101 is a four credit hour lecture-based course designed to provide the student with a basic knowledge and understanding of inorganic chemistry with a brief introduction to organic chemistry. All topics will emphasize the impact of chemistry in everyday life. Topics include: measurements, atomic structure, periodic classification, chemical equations, solutions, acids, bases, gas laws, types of reactions, bonding, and stoichiometry.
  • SCIE 112 - INTRO/HUMAN BIOLOGY (4)

    SCIE 112

    INTRO/HUMAN BIOLOGY

    Course Description

    SCIE 112 is a four credit hour lecture-based course designed to provide the student with a basic knowledge and understanding of human biology with an emphasis on the impact of science in everyday life. Topics include: chemistry of living things, cell structure and function, genetics and inheritance, cellular reproduction, and the basic anatomy and physiology of major organ systems in the human body.
  • SCIE 114 - EARTH SCIENCE (4)

    SCIE 114

    EARTH SCIENCE

    Course Description

    Earth Science is a four credit hour course that consists of three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of laboratory components. Earth Science is a survey course that provides an overview of geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy. Topics covered will focus on the materials that make up the Earth, the changes that occur both on the surface and in the interior of the Earth, and the forces and processes that are responsible for these changes. In order to pass the course, students must receive an average score of 60% on the laboratory component of the course, in addition to achieving the total number of points prescribed in the syllabus.
  • SCIE 131 - ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (4)

    SCIE 131

    ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

    Course Description

    Environmental Science is a four credit hour course that consists of three credit hour lecture and one credit hour laboratory components. Environmental Science is an introductory course that explores Earth's natural systems and how human activity affects the environment. Topics covered include food and agriculture, population dynamics, urbanization, resource use and depletion, pollution, environmental health, and sustainability. In order to pass the course, students must receive an average score of 60% on the laboratory component of the course, in addition to achieving the total number of points prescribed in the syllabus.
  • SCIE 200 - SCIENCE AND SOCIETY (2)

    SCIE 200

    SCIENCE AND SOCIETY

    Course Description

    Science and Society is a two credit hour lecture based course that seeks to explore and understand the ways that science and technology shape the daily lives of humans. We will examine the nature of science and investigate the current controversies over issues in science and technology, so that informed choices among competing scientific, technological, and political and social priorities can be made.
  • SCIE 225 - MICROBIOLOGY (4)

    SCIE 225

    MICROBIOLOGY

    Course Description

    This course is designed to provide the student with a basic knowledge and understanding of medical microbiology. Healthcare applications, microbiological fundamentals, and control of microorganisms are all integrated to assist students in learning microbiology. Topics that will be covered include: types of microorganisms, microbial growth and metabolism, control of microbial populations, and principles of infection and immunity.
Social and Behavioral Sciences

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

  • ANTH 215 - CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4)

    ANTH 215

    CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY

    Course Description

    This course exposes students to the principles, concepts, research methods, and applications of cultural anthropology. Students will be introduced to the wide range of variation in social and institutional arrangements found historically and cross-culturally. From language to gender roles, from bases of social stratification to causes and consequences of conformity, from the simpler life in foraging societies to the seeming-chaos in modern post-industrial societies: students will examine the enormous variation in solutions to the requisites of social life.
  • ECON 210 - INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS (4)

    ECON 210

    INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS

    Course Description

    An introduction to economic theory involving the examination of how decision making by firms and individuals is shaped by economic forces. Emphasis is placed on demand, supply, market equilibrium analysis, and basic market structure models. The invisible hand as the driving force for economic decisions as well as market externalities are discussed. The class concentrates on providing a balanced approach to studying economic agents' behavior and the global implications and outcomes.
  • ECON 220 - INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS (4)

    ECON 220

    INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS

    Course Description

    An introduction to economic theory involving the basic underlying causes and principles of the operation of an economic system. Emphasis is placed on studying the economy as a whole. Issues of inflation, unemployment, taxation, business cycles and growth are discussed in the context of the global economic system.
  • PSYC 110 - GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY (4)

    PSYC 110

    GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY

    Course Description

    A survey of the various fields of study comprising modern scientific psychology. The course examines the theories, research findings, and applications in each of the major areas of psychology, with the goal of providing students with practice information they can apply to their personal and professional lives. The topic areas covered in the course include learning and memory, motivation and emotion, human development, theories of personality, psychopathology, and social behavior.
  • PSYC 204 - PRINCIPLES OF MOTIVATION (4)

    PSYC 204

    PRINCIPLES OF MOTIVATION

    Course Description

    This course is a systematic study of various theories and approaches to work motivation, with assessments of the research and practice evidence supporting their scientific validity and applicability to the work environment. Students will explore factors that contribute to motivation and strategies that today's manager can use to become a successful motivator.
  • SOCL 110 - INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (4)

    SOCL 110

    INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

    Course Description

    Sociology is the scientific study of group behavior - whether the groups are dyads, small groups, associations, bureaucracies, societies, publics, aggregates, social movements, or mobs, etc. This introductory course introduces the student to sociological principles and theoretical perspectives that facilitate understanding the norms, values, structure and process of the various types of groups into which people organize. The course focuses on applying the scientific method to studying social problems (e.g. poverty, crime, sexism and racism) and basic institutions (i.e. family, government, economy, religion, education). Students will develop their "sociological imagination" as a way of understanding what their lives are and can be in relation to the larger social forces at work in local, national, and international environments.
  • PUAD 295 - AMERICAN GOVERNMENT IN ACTION (4)

    PUAD 295

    AMERICAN GOVERNMENT IN ACTION

    Course Description

    The course examines the American system of government and how government affects and interacts with individuals and organizations in society. Students learn how politics, law, and the structure and principles of American government impact citizens, public policy, and the administration of public and private organizations. Students apply fundamental political theories and administration law principles in personal and professional contexts.
Arts and Humanities

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

  • HUMN 210 - INTRO TO LOGIC & CRITICL THINKNG SKILLS (2)

    HUMN 210

    INTRO TO LOGIC & CRITICL THINKNG SKILLS

    Course Description

    The goal of this course is to help you improve as a critical, logical thinker. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. You will discover how to apply these valuable skills to your studies and everyday life, learning how to overcome obstacles to critical thinking, and how to avoid being deceived by means of misleading reasoning.
  • HUMN 211 - INTRO TO ETHICAL ANALYSIS AND REASONING (2)

    HUMN 211

    INTRO TO ETHICAL ANALYSIS AND REASONING

    Course Description

    The goal of this course is to help you improve your ethical analysis and reasoning skills. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing ethical arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. In this course, you will discover how to apply the following questions to your job and everyday life. Why do we need ethics if we have laws to govern our behavior? Does the majority view determine what is ethical and what is not? Are feelings, desires, and preferences reliable ethical guides? Is it ever appropriate to criticize another individual's (or culture's) ethical judgment? Are people always responsible for their actions? Do human beings have a natural tendency to good, a natural tendency to evil? both? neither? Is there a single moral code that is binding on all people, at all times, and in all places?
  • HUMN 218 - WORLD RELIGIONS (4)

    HUMN 218

    WORLD RELIGIONS

    Course Description

    A comparative study of the founders, sacred writings, beliefs and practices of some of the major world religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Islam, Judaism and Christianity. This course enables the student to study and compare the leading religions of the world in light of their historical and cultural backgrounds. Students will be encouraged to explore faith traditions other than their own. Common themes across religions, spiritual practice, and current related cultural and political issues will also be considered.
  • HUMN 232 - INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE (4)

    HUMN 232

    INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE

    Course Description

    In this course, students will analyze works from the three major literary genres: poetry, drama, and fiction. Students will become familiar with standard vocabulary and approaches specific to the field of literary criticism and consider the importance of literature in contemporary society. The goal of this course is to encourage students to read for pleasure (engage with the text on an emotional level) while also moving towards a more objective consideration of literature by introducing the fundamentals of close reading and literary analysis.
  • HUMN 240 - POPULAR CULTURE (4)

    HUMN 240

    POPULAR CULTURE

    Course Description

    An introductory course that examines basic concepts in popular culture studies and the role popular arts and artifacts play in shaping cultural values. The course covers basic theories and approaches to topics like best sellers, popular music, popular art forms, cultural heroes from the sports and entertainment worlds and other popular phenomena.
  • HUMN 246 - FILM APPRECIATION (4)

    HUMN 246

    FILM APPRECIATION

    Course Description

    This course is an introduction to the art of film intended to enable students to become more knowledgeable, appreciative and critical viewers. The course covers the major areas of film: narrative, documentary, animated and experimental. While some film history is covered, this course emphasizes understanding key elements in the filmmaking process: scripting, filming, editing, acting, directing, promoting and distributing. Students will be required to view and write critical reviews of films screened both in and out of class.
Learn More About General Education

Additional General Education Requirements (26 hours)

  • COMP 106 - INTRODUCTION TO SPREADSHEETS (1)

    COMP 106

    INTRODUCTION TO SPREADSHEETS

    Course Description

    This course focuses on using spreadsheets to solve business applications.
  • COMP 108 - INTRODUCTION TO DATABASES (1)

    COMP 108

    INTRODUCTION TO DATABASES

    Course Description

    This course focuses on using databases to solve business applications.
  • ECON 210 - INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS (4)

    ECON 210

    INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS

    Course Description

    An introduction to economic theory involving the examination of how decision making by firms and individuals is shaped by economic forces. Emphasis is placed on demand, supply, market equilibrium analysis, and basic market structure models. The invisible hand as the driving force for economic decisions as well as market externalities are discussed. The class concentrates on providing a balanced approach to studying economic agents' behavior and the global implications and outcomes.

    OR ECON 220 - INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS (4)

    ECON 220

    INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS

    Course Description

    An introduction to economic theory involving the basic underlying causes and principles of the operation of an economic system. Emphasis is placed on studying the economy as a whole. Issues of inflation, unemployment, taxation, business cycles and growth are discussed in the context of the global economic system.
    1
  • HUMN 305 - GLOBAL ISSUES (4)

    HUMN 305

    GLOBAL ISSUES

    Course Description

    This course provides students with a coherent sense of the past and present human societies drawn from five cultural areas: Asia, Africa, Europe, North America and South America. It also reviews the diversity of traditions that have formed the world and continue to interact in it today. Through the synthesis of connections, influences and parallels among cultures, students will gain an understanding of how to communicate in a culturally diverse world.
  • PF 321 - LEARNING STRATEGIES (2)

    PF 321

    LEARNING STRATEGIES

    Course Description

    This course prepares students to be successful lifelong learners both academically and in their chosen careers. Franklin courses require a high level of self-directed learning and focus on skills required in the workplace and the classroom that are easily transferable between the two environments. The course includes strategies for advancing communication skills, including the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments. The assignments and activities in the course are created to closely simulate teamwork found in the workplace.
  • SPCH 100 - SPEECH COMMUNICATION (4)

    SPCH 100

    SPEECH COMMUNICATION

    Course Description

    A basic public speaking course intended to improve the student's ability to think critically and to communicate orally. Theory and practice are provided in various speaking situations. Each student is required to speak before an audience, but class work also involves reading, gathering and organizing information, writing and listening.

    OR COMM 150 - INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION (4)

    COMM 150

    INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION

    Course Description

    By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking.
  • WRIT 320 - BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WRITING (4)

    WRIT 320

    BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WRITING

    Course Description

    This is an advanced composition course for juniors and seniors which focuses on business, technical and professional writing. Skills taught include audience analysis; research methods; questionnaire, interview and survey techniques; letters; data collection, interpretation and documentation; graphic illustration; and composition of reports in special formats. Instruction and practice are provided in writing various types of reports such as r‚sum‚s, proposals, summaries, research reports and instructions for user manuals, and in presenting committee and oral reports. Students will be encouraged to relate course materials to their major programs and their workplaces.
  • General Education Electives (6)
1 Select another Social Sciences elective if either Economics course is used in the Fundamental General Education Core.

Professional Core (16 hours)

  • CJAD 210 - INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICEyADMINISTRATION (4)

    CJAD 210

    INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICEyADMINISTRATION

    Course Description

    This is an introductory course designed to expose students to the various Major elements of the criminal justice system (police, courts, and corrections). Students will learn about the ways in which the various systems interact, the processing of offenders, the various forms of punishment and the alternatives to punishment. The future of the criminal justice system will also be discussed.
  • CJAD 240 - INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINOLOGY (4)

    CJAD 240

    INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINOLOGY

    Course Description

    This course will focus on theories of crime and types of offending. Topics related the causation, control and prevention of criminal behavior will be addressed in this course.
  • PUAD 295 - AMERICAN GOVERNMENT IN ACTION (4)

    PUAD 295

    AMERICAN GOVERNMENT IN ACTION

    Course Description

    The course examines the American system of government and how government affects and interacts with individuals and organizations in society. Students learn how politics, law, and the structure and principles of American government impact citizens, public policy, and the administration of public and private organizations. Students apply fundamental political theories and administration law principles in personal and professional contexts.
  • SOCL 335 - APPLIED RESEARCH METHODS (4)

    SOCL 335

    APPLIED RESEARCH METHODS

    Course Description

    Applied Research Methods introduces students to foundational issues of social scientific research - that is, research entailing the application of the scientific method to the study of human behavior. Students will examine the strengths and weaknesses of major quantitative and qualitative data collection techniques as well as the processes involved in planning and executing such projects and the standards of evaluating the quality of data.

University Electives (22 hours)

  • Any undergraduate courses offered by the University except developmental education courses.

Major Area (28 hours)

  • CJAD 310 - COURTS AND CRIMINAL PROCEDURE (4)

    CJAD 310

    COURTS AND CRIMINAL PROCEDURE

    Course Description

    This course addresses the requirements for processing criminal offenders through the court system. Topics include structure of the court system in the U.S., evidentiary standards, constitutional protections, the role and importance of case law, and the role of the prosecutor and defense attorney in the courts.
  • CJAD 315 - POLICING IN AMERICA (4)

    CJAD 315

    POLICING IN AMERICA

    Course Description

    This course will provide the student with an overview of the philosophy and history of policing in America. Students will learn about personnel and management issues related to policing. Students will also be exposed to topics including police discretion, police use of force, civil liability, police culture, and the impact of the war on terrorism on police operations and practices.
  • CJAD 320 - CORRECTIONS IN AMERICA (4)

    CJAD 320

    CORRECTIONS IN AMERICA

    Course Description

    This course considers contemporary corrections in America. This course will include a review of recent corrections-related research and a discussion of the role corrections plays in the criminal justice system. Topics covered will include a historical overview of corrections in America, alternatives to incarceration, types and functions of various prison systems in corrections, and various categories of inmates within the corrections system.
  • CJAD 330 - JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY (4)

    CJAD 330

    JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY

    Course Description

    This course will address the history of the U.S. juvenile justice system and the nature and extent of youth crime. It will focus on the correlates and theoretical perspectives used to explain juvenile delinquency all within a framework of current research and strategies used to prevent, treat, and control youth crime. Students will analyze and apply these concepts to the structure within which juveniles are taken into custody, treated, processed, rehabilitated or punished in an integrated and collaborative environment. Finally, students will examine basic criminal justice research methods and the role of science and inquiry in criminal justice.
  • CJAD 450 - CRIMINAL JUSTICE MANAGEMENT ANDyADMINISTRATION (4)

    CJAD 450

    CRIMINAL JUSTICE MANAGEMENT ANDyADMINISTRATION

    Course Description

    This course will examine the basic concepts of management and administration as applied to agencies in the criminal justice system. Emphasis will be placed on issues related to the effective management and administration of criminal justice agencies. Topics covered will include environmental influence; conflict, power, and ethical issues; motivation, leadership, and communication. The concept of the service quality approach will also be considered.
  • CJAD 455 - ETHICS IN THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM (4)

    CJAD 455

    ETHICS IN THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

    Course Description

    This course will address the topics of ethical and moral values as they pertain to the criminal justice system. Topics covered will include ethics and the police, racial discrimination in the criminal justice system, the purpose of punishment, ethics in corrections, and the ethics of criminal justice policy making.
  • CJAD 495 - CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATIONyCAPSTONE (4)

    CJAD 495

    CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATIONyCAPSTONE

    Course Description

    The Criminal Justice Capstone will be the final course completed by students in the Criminal Justice Program. The capstone course will include a practicum that will allow students to apply the theories, principles and knowledge obtained throughout the criminal justice program to a real-life problem or project in a criminal justice agency. For students who may not be associated with a criminal justice agency; an alternative to the practicum will be a research project that identifies and examines a current criminal justice issue or problem. Students will complete a research paper with recommendations for addressing the identified problem. The recommendations will be based on the theories, principles and knowledge obtained throughout the criminal justice program. Prerequisites: Completion of all Professional Core Courses.

Major Electives (8 hours)

Select 8 hours from:

  • CJAD 415 - CONTEMPORARY POLICING STRATEGIES ANDyISSUES (4)

    CJAD 415

    CONTEMPORARY POLICING STRATEGIES ANDyISSUES

    Course Description

    Students will review contemporary policing strategies to include: Community policing, Problem Oriented Policing and other strategies related to crime prevention and crime reduction. Students will also be exposed to current issues related to both the internal and external environments of police agencies. Issues related to police deviance and ethical issues will also be addressed.
  • CJAD 425 - PROBATION AND PAROLE (4)

    CJAD 425

    PROBATION AND PAROLE

    Course Description

    This course addresses the role of probation, parole and community corrections in the U.S. corrections system. Topics include management and supervision of a full range of intermediate alternatives to prison and jail including pretrial release, diversion, economic sanctions, probation, residential supervision, and other unique alternatives. Philosophies and theories of offender treatment and punishment will be analyzed within the context and application of public policy. Parole will be examined and various programs will be compared and contrasted in light of best evidence and economic policies in the U.S. A particular focus will be paid to successful reentry and wraparound programming. Risk assessment will be integrated throughout as a contemporary and data-driven means of individualized rehabilitative and treatment models that seek to lower recidivism and improve public safety.
  • CJAD 430 - JUVENILE CORRECTIONS (4)

    CJAD 430

    JUVENILE CORRECTIONS

    Course Description

    This course will present students with an introduction and history of juvenile corrections. More in-depth coverage will focus on contemporary sentencing and correctional strategies including alternative sanctions. Students will be exposed to treatment and rehabilitative programmatic trends both inside and outside secure institutions. Additional topics will include correctional staff training, risk assessment, and evaluative studies both quantitative and qualitative.
  • CJAD 440 - SOCIOLOGY OF DEVIANT BEHAVIOR (4)

    CJAD 440

    SOCIOLOGY OF DEVIANT BEHAVIOR

    Course Description

    Students will become familiar with the various theories of deviant behavior and discuss deviance in terms of both criminal and non-criminal behavior. Topics covered in this course will include types of deviance, deviance and crime, stigma, physical disabilities, mental disorders, and recent forms of deviance.
  • CJAD 480 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION (1 - 4)

    CJAD 480

    SPECIAL TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION

    Course Description

    A variable content classroom course in Criminal Justice Administration in which students pursue topics or subjects of current interest that are not part of the regular curriculum. A specific course description will be published online in the Course Schedule for the trimester the course is offered.
  • CJAD 499 - INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION (1 - 4)

    CJAD 499

    INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION

    Course Description

    Independent course studies allow students in good academic standing to pursue learning in areas not covered by the regular curriculum or to extend study in areas presently taught. Study is under faculty supervision and graded on either a Pass/No Credit or a letter grade basis. (See the "Independent Studies" section of the Academic Bulletin for more details.)
  • PUAD 420 - PUBLIC & NONPROFIT FISCAL ADMINISTATION (4)

    PUAD 420

    PUBLIC & NONPROFIT FISCAL ADMINISTATION

    Course Description

    Students learn fundamental budgeting, accounting, and financial management concepts and techniques necessary for planning, analysis, and decision making in public and nonprofit organizations. Students also examine the competing values and politics that underlie and impact the budget process and financial decisions. Finally, students apply skills for effectively communicating financial analysis methods and conclusions with colleagues, elected officials, the media, and the public.
  • SEMT 326 - SECURITY OPERATIONS THEORY AND PRACTICE (4)

    SEMT 326

    SECURITY OPERATIONS THEORY AND PRACTICE

    Course Description

    This course will provide insight into the history, theory, and principles of security operations in private and industrial settings.
  • SEMT 328 - EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT THEORY & PRACTICE (4)

    SEMT 328

    EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT THEORY & PRACTICE

    Course Description

    This course will focus on Emergency Management and Homeland Security in the Post 9-11 era. Emphasis will be on mitigation and preparedness related to international and domestic terrorism as well as natural disasters.
  • SEMT 335 - INTRODUCTION TO EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT &yHOMELAND SECURITY (4)

    SEMT 335

    INTRODUCTION TO EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT &yHOMELAND SECURITY

    Course Description

    This course analyzes emergency management from a historical perspective. Disaster planning and disaster management in the post 9-11 environment are analyzed. The impact of Homeland Security on local public safety agencies is examined as are selected Homeland Security Presidential Directives (HSPD #5 and HSPD #11 in particular). The National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the National Response Plan (NRP) are examined with regard to their impact on local public safety agencies. Finally, special challenges for emergency management and disaster response will be analyzed.
  • SEMT 438 - PRINCIPLES OF SECURITY MANAGEMENT (4)

    SEMT 438

    PRINCIPLES OF SECURITY MANAGEMENT

    Course Description

    This course examines the principles involved in leading and managing private security operations. Areas covered in this class will include leadership, supervision, and a range of personnel issues, including staffing and training, as they pertain to private security operations.

Additional Requirements

  • All students are required to pass College Writing (WRIT 120), either Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121) or Learning Strategies (PF 321) and either Speech Communication (SPCH 100) or Interpersonal Communication (COMM 150) prior to enrolling in any other course at the 200 level or above. Either PF 121 or PF 321 must be taken prior to the first BLF course, or it may be taken concurrently with the first 15-week BLF course. Students who enroll at Franklin with 30 or fewer hours of transfer credit are required to pass Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121) in place of Learning Strategies (PF 321). Students must also meet the University algebra competency requirement.

Please see the Academic Bulletin for the complete list of degree and residency requirements.

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