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Criminal Justice Administration Degree Program

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Major Area Course Descriptions

CJAD 310 - COURTS AND CRIMINAL PROCEDURE

This course addresses the requirements for processing criminal offenders through the court system. Topics include structure of the court system in the U.S., evidentiary standards, constitutional protections, the role and importance of case law, and the role of the prosecutor and defense attorney in the courts.

CJAD 315 - POLICING IN AMERICA

This course will provide the student with an overview of the philosophy and history of policing in America. Students will learn about personnel and management issues related to policing. Students will also be exposed to topics including police discretion, police use of force, civil liability, police culture, and the impact of the war on terrorism on police operations and practices.

CJAD 320 - CORRECTIONS IN AMERICA

This course considers contemporary corrections in America. This course will include a review of recent corrections-related research and a discussion of the role corrections plays in the criminal justice system. Topics covered will include a historical overview of corrections in America, alternatives to incarceration, types and functions of various prison systems in corrections, and various categories of inmates within the corrections system.

CJAD 330 - JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY

This course will address the history of the U.S. juvenile justice system and the nature and extent of youth crime. It will focus on the correlates and theoretical perspectives used to explain juvenile delinquency all within a framework of current research and strategies used to prevent, treat, and control youth crime. Students will analyze and apply these concepts to the structure within which juveniles are taken into custody, treated, processed, rehabilitated or punished in an integrated and collaborative environment. Finally, students will examine basic criminal justice research methods and the role of science and inquiry in criminal justice.

CJAD 415 - CONTEMPORARY POLICING STRATEGIES AND ISSUES

Students will review contemporary policing strategies to include: Community policing, Problem Oriented Policing and other strategies related to crime prevention and crime reduction. Students will also be exposed to current issues related to both the internal and external environments of police agencies. Issues related to police deviance and ethical issues will also be addressed.

CJAD 450 - CRIMINAL JUSTICE MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION

This course will examine the basic concepts of management and administration as applied to agencies in the criminal justice system. Emphasis will be placed on issues related to the effective management and administration of criminal justice agencies. Topics covered will include environmental influence; conflict, power, and ethical issues; motivation, leadership, and communication. The concept of the service quality approach will also be considered.

CJAD 455 - ETHICS IN THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

This course will address the topics of ethical and moral values as they pertain to the criminal justice system. Topics covered will include ethics and the police, racial discrimination in the criminal justice system, the purpose of punishment, ethics in corrections, and the ethics of criminal justice policy making.

CJAD 495 - CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION CAPSTONE

The Criminal Justice Capstone will be the final course completed by students in the Criminal Justice Program. The capstone course will include a practicum that will allow students to apply the theories, principles and knowledge obtained throughout the criminal justice program to a real-life problem or project in a criminal justice agency. For students who may not be associated with a criminal justice agency; an alternative to the practicum will be a research project that identifies and examines a current criminal justice issue or problem. Students will complete a research paper with recommendations for addressing the identified problem. The recommendations will be based on the theories, principles and knowledge obtained throughout the criminal justice program. Prerequisites: Completion of all Professional Core Courses.

Major Electives Course Descriptions

CJAD 415 - CONTEMPORARY POLICING STRATEGIES AND ISSUES

Students will review contemporary policing strategies to include: Community policing, Problem Oriented Policing and other strategies related to crime prevention and crime reduction. Students will also be exposed to current issues related to both the internal and external environments of police agencies. Issues related to police deviance and ethical issues will also be addressed.

CJAD 425 - PROBATION AND PAROLE

This course addresses the role of probation, parole and community corrections in the U.S. corrections system. Topics include management and supervision of a full range of intermediate alternatives to prison and jail including pretrial release, diversion, economic sanctions, probation, residential supervision, and other unique alternatives. Philosophies and theories of offender treatment and punishment will be analyzed within the context and application of public policy. Parole will be examined and various programs will be compared and contrasted in light of best evidence and economic policies in the U.S. A particular focus will be paid to successful reentry and wraparound programming. Risk assessment will be integrated throughout as a contemporary and data-driven means of individualized rehabilitative and treatment models that seek to lower recidivism and improve public safety.

CJAD 430 - JUVENILE CORRECTIONS

This course will present students with an introduction and history of juvenile corrections. More in-depth coverage will focus on contemporary sentencing and correctional strategies including alternative sanctions. Students will be exposed to treatment and rehabilitative programmatic trends both inside and outside secure institutions. Additional topics will include correctional staff training, risk assessment, and evaluative studies both quantitative and qualitative.

CJAD 440 - SOCIOLOGY OF DEVIANT BEHAVIOR

Students will become familiar with the various theories of deviant behavior and discuss deviance in terms of both criminal and non-criminal behavior. Topics covered in this course will include types of deviance, deviance and crime, stigma, physical disabilities, mental disorders, and recent forms of deviance.

CJAD 480 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION

A variable content classroom course in Criminal Justice Administration in which students pursue topics or subjects of current interest that are not part of the regular curriculum. A specific course description will be published online in the Course Schedule for the trimester the course is offered.

CJAD 485 - MISCARRIAGES OF JUSTICE: THE DEATH PENALTY & BEYOND

This course will introduce students to the magnitude, complexities, and solutions to miscarriages of justice within our criminal system. Students will distinguish both narrow and broad injustices and compare and contrast the costs, human and financial, associated with these miscarriages while integrating plausible solutions within political, cultural, and legal frameworks.

CJAD 499 - INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION

Independent course studies allow students in good academic standing to pursue learning in areas not covered by the regular curriculum or to extend study in areas presently taught. Study is under faculty supervision and graded on either a Pass/No Credit or a letter grade basis. (See the "Independent Studies" section of the Academic Bulletin for more details.)

COMM 321 - ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION

The course examines the role of communication in organizations. Students will learn the major theories of organizational communication, identifying and defining primary concepts, and applying them to discussions of real-world situations. The role of technology, corporate culture, leadership, teamwork, ethics, and diversity in communication is examined. Effective communication in global organizations and critiques of organization communication systems and structures are also presented.

PBRL 425 - MEDIA AND CRISIS COMMUNICATION

Today's public relations professionals have entered a new era where preparedness to respond rapidly to various levels of crisis is essential. Building a positive reputation through the strategic management of communications with internal and external audiences during good times is a necessary foundation for withstanding negative press. Utilizing analysis techniques, public relations tactics, and hands-on projects, students will evaluate crisis situations, create and implement a strategic crisis communication plan, and learn to coach the corporate spokesperson and manage the media, while maintaining the organization's reputation.

PUAD 420 - PUBLIC & NONPROFIT FISCAL ADMINISTATION

Students learn fundamental budgeting, accounting, and financial management concepts and techniques necessary for planning, analysis, and decision making in government and nonprofit organizations. Students also examine the competing values and politics that underlie and impact the budget process and financial decisions. Finally, students apply skills for effectively communicating financial analysis methods and conclusions with colleagues, elected officials, the media, and the public.

SEMT 326 - SECURITY OPERATIONS THEORY AND PRACTICE

This course will provide insight into the history, theory, and principles of security operations in private and industrial settings.

SEMT 328 - EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT THEORY & PRACTICE

This course will focus on Emergency Management and Homeland Security in the Post 9-11 era. Emphasis will be on mitigation and preparedness related to international and domestic terrorism as well as natural disasters.

SEMT 335 - INTRODUCTION TO EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT & HOMELAND SECURITY

This course analyzes emergency management from a historical perspective. Disaster planning and disaster management in the post 9-11 environment are analyzed. The impact of Homeland Security on local public safety agencies is examined as are selected Homeland Security Presidential Directives (HSPD #5 and HSPD #11 in particular). The National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the National Response Plan (NRP) are examined with regard to their impact on local public safety agencies. Finally, special challenges for emergency management and disaster response will be analyzed.

SEMT 438 - PRINCIPLES OF SECURITY MANAGEMENT

This course examines the principles involved in leading and managing private security operations. Areas covered in this class will include leadership, supervision, and a range of personnel issues, including staffing and training, as they pertain to private security operations.

The above list of courses only represents a portion of the courses required for a bachelor's degree. View the bachelor's degree full curriculum.

Additional Course Descriptions

Professional Core

Take a detailed look at courses that build upon your general education knowledge, and help to prepare you for major area coursework.

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