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Cyber Security Degree Program

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Major Area Course Descriptions

ISEC 300 - INFORMATION ASSURANCE

In a highly connected, data intensive, and cost-focused business environment, the practice of information security not a business advantage; it is a customer requirement. Viruses, malware, trojans, denial of service attacks, phishing, and even Wiki leaks have become headline news. Failure to insure the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of data costs companies millions, if not billions of dollars in legal settlements, lost business, and trade secrets. In this breadth-based course, you will get an overview of information security principles and practices, including security models, risk management, access controls, intrusion detection and prevention, cryptography, software vulnerabilities, and ethical issues. Subsequent courses expand on this foundational material in much greater depth. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.

ISEC 350 - SECURITY RISK MANAGEMENT

Proper assessment, management, and mitigation of risk are essential to any information security strategy. Risks aren't just related to IT assets, but to the overall business that the IT organization is supporting, thus, business continuity planning and impact analysis is also important. In this course, you will learn how to identify and analyze risks, determine impacts, and develop plans to mitigate issues. Topics include threats, vulnerabilities, exploits, and countermeasures; US compliance laws; risk assessment and mitigation; business impact analysis; and business continuity and disaster recovery planning.

ISEC 375 - DIGITAL FORENSICS & INCIDENT RESPONSE

The prevalence of data breaches, identity theft, and the dark net today makes the study of digital forensics and cybercrime highly relevant to information security. Identifying, acquiring, preserving, analyzing and reporting evidence to business and law enforcement is a much-needed skill. This course will cover those topics as well as the live versus dead-box techniques, appropriate legal and regulatory issues, open source and commercial tools, and the special challenges represented by new and emerging technologies.

ISEC 400 - SOFTWARED DEVELOPMENT SECURITY

Software vulnerabilities, especially those that compromise personal or financial data, are appallingly common. Nearly every major software company has needed to deal with the fallout of a major incident due to vulnerabilities in their products. Writing correct - let alone secure - software is very difficult. Yet users and executives expect it. In this course, you will learn about the typical development mistakes that lead to application-level security issues as well as how to defend against them. Students will explore the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) top 10 security vulnerabilities. Topics include unchecked user input, injection, fuzzing, CSRF, XSS, cryptography, CAPTCHA, configuration errors, authentication, and authorization.

ISEC 475 - SECURITY ENGINEERING & ASSESSMENT

Ensuring the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of large and complex systems is notoriously difficult in the face of capable and determined opponents. This course discusses security engineering as the practical application of requirements analysis, modeling, architecture, processes, and measurement toward improving the dependability of complex information systems throughout their lifecycle.

ISEC 495 - CYBER SECURITY CAPSTONE

The Information Security Capstone course encourages teamwork in small groups on a substantial project. The intent of this course is to provide a capstone experience that integrates the material contained in courses required of the information security major. It also provides an opportunity for students to recognize and evaluate the interrelationship of their general education courses with the courses taken for their information security major. The major areas of the program are reviewed and assessed via standardized exams. Students will also culminate their experiences with an overview of the evolution of computer systems and a look at the near-term future. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.

ITEC 350 - WINDOWS ADMINISTRATION

This course provides the student with an introduction to Windows Server 2008 administration and is structured to assist a network manager or planner in planning, configuring, installing, running, and repairing networks that include a Windows Server 2008. As such, it provides an introduction to server installation, Active Directory, printer management, domains, network clients, security, disaster recovery, fault/error management, and scripting of common tasks. This course also uses virtualization software to isolate the Windows Server 2008 operating system from the underlying host operating system. As such, administrative access to a fast machine running Windows XP or better with at least 2 gigabytes of memory and 40 gigabytes of available hard drive space is required. For face to face classes, an external USB 2.0 hard drive with at least 40 gigabytes of free space is required to bring to class.

MIS 310 - INFORMATION SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE & TECHNOLOGY

This course provides a conceptual survey of general systems theory followed by a conceptual and technological survey of the structure of distributed information systems architectures, operating systems, network operating systems, peripheral technology and user interfaces. Interoperability between these architectural components will be explored and current technology and trends in each architectural element will be reviewed. This course will de-emphasize, although not ignore, mainframe architectures in favor of information architectures more applicable to client/server computing. The various interacting categories of client/server computing as well as the benefits and implications of such a system will be fully explored.

WEBD 236 - WEB INFORMATION SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING

This course builds web applications by employing server-side scripts that query relational databases. The student learns and reflects on two- and three-tier software architectures, separation of responsibility, model-view-controller pattern, basic security, and web frameworks. The student will design, code, test, debug, and document programs using a server-based scripting language. Note: This is a technology course in a technology program, and it requires the purchase of software that may be used in subsequent courses as well as being suitable for commercial work beyond completion of degree studies. For specific software requirements, consult the course syllabus.

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The above list of courses only represents a portion of the courses required for a bachelor's degree. View the bachelor's degree full curriculum.

Additional Course Descriptions

Professional Core

Take a detailed look at courses that build upon your general education knowledge, and help to prepare you for major area coursework.

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