Subscribe to our Newsletter

Helpful articles and useful tips for adults considering a college degree.

Thank you for signing up for our newsletter!

You will soon receive an email
confirming your request.

Emergency Management & Homeland Security

Emergency Management Degrees Online - Homeland Security Training Program OverviewProgram DetailsWhy Choose Franklin
Back To Program Details

Emergency Management & Homeland Security - Subsequent Bachelor of Science Degree

Looking to earn an additional bachelor’s degree? This degree is specifically designed for students who have already completed a bachelor's degree or higher.

Prerequisite Competencies

  • COMP 106 - INTRODUCTION TO SPREADSHEETS (1)

    COMP 106

    INTRODUCTION TO SPREADSHEETS

    Course Description

    This course focuses on using spreadsheets to solve business applications.
  • COMP 108 - INTRODUCTION TO DATABASES (1)

    COMP 108

    INTRODUCTION TO DATABASES

    Course Description

    This course focuses on using databases to solve business applications.
  • ECON 210 - INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS (4)

    ECON 210

    INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS

    Course Description

    An introduction to economic theory involving the examination of how decision making by firms and individuals is shaped by economic forces. Emphasis is placed on demand, supply, market equilibrium analysis, and basic market structure models. The invisible hand as the driving force for economic decisions as well as market externalities are discussed. The class concentrates on providing a balanced approach to studying economic agents' behavior and the global implications and outcomes.

    OR ECON 220 - INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS (4)

    ECON 220

    INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS

    Course Description

    An introduction to economic theory involving the basic underlying causes and principles of the operation of an economic system. Emphasis is placed on studying the economy as a whole. Issues of inflation, unemployment, taxation, business cycles and growth are discussed in the context of the global economic system.
  • MATH 215 - STATISTICAL CONCEPTS (4)

    MATH 215

    STATISTICAL CONCEPTS

    Course Description

    This course introduces the student to statistics with business applications. The course covers both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics included are: measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion; graphical displays of data; linear regression; basic probability concepts; binomial and normal probability distributions; confidence intervals; and hypothesis testing. These topics will be covered using a basic knowledge of algebra and Microsoft Excel.
  • PF 321 - LEARNING STRATEGIES (2)

    PF 321

    LEARNING STRATEGIES

    Course Description

    This course prepares students to be successful lifelong learners both academically and in their chosen careers. Franklin courses require a high level of self-directed learning and focus on skills required in the workplace and the classroom that are easily transferable between the two environments. The course includes strategies for advancing communication skills, including the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments. The assignments and activities in the course are created to closely simulate teamwork found in the workplace.
  • WRIT 320 - BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WRITING (4)

    WRIT 320

    BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WRITING

    Course Description

    This is an advanced composition course for juniors and seniors which focuses on business, technical and professional writing. Skills taught include audience analysis; research methods; questionnaire, interview and survey techniques; letters; data collection, interpretation and documentation; graphic illustration; and composition of reports in special formats. Instruction and practice are provided in writing various types of reports such as r‚sum‚s, proposals, summaries, research reports and instructions for user manuals, and in presenting committee and oral reports. Students will be encouraged to relate course materials to their major programs and their workplaces.

Professional Core (16 hours)

  • PUAD 295 - AMERICAN GOVERNMENT IN ACTION (4)

    PUAD 295

    AMERICAN GOVERNMENT IN ACTION

    Course Description

    The course examines the American system of government and how government affects and interacts with individuals and organizations in society. Students learn how politics, law, and the structure and principles of American government impact citizens, public policy, and the administration of public and private organizations. Students apply fundamental political theories and administration law principles in personal and professional contexts.
  • PUAD 450 - LEADERSHIP FOR PUBLIC AND NONPROFITyORGANIZATIONS (4)

    PUAD 450

    LEADERSHIP FOR PUBLIC AND NONPROFITyORGANIZATIONS

    Course Description

    Students learn fundamental leadership concepts and skills for managing the day-to-day administration of public and nonprofit organizations. The course emphasizes an action orientation and problem solving for common political and organizational challenges faced by public and nonprofit leaders and managers.
  • SEMT 335 - INTRODUCTION TO EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT &yHOMELAND SECURITY (4)

    SEMT 335

    INTRODUCTION TO EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT &yHOMELAND SECURITY

    Course Description

    This course analyzes emergency management from a historical perspective. Disaster planning and disaster management in the post 9-11 environment are analyzed. The impact of Homeland Security on local public safety agencies is examined as are selected Homeland Security Presidential Directives (HSPD #5 and HSPD #11 in particular). The National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the National Response Plan (NRP) are examined with regard to their impact on local public safety agencies. Finally, special challenges for emergency management and disaster response will be analyzed.
  • SOCL 110 - INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (4)

    SOCL 110

    INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

    Course Description

    Sociology is the scientific study of group behavior - whether the groups are dyads, small groups, associations, bureaucracies, societies, publics, aggregates, social movements, or mobs, etc. This introductory course introduces the student to sociological principles and theoretical perspectives that facilitate understanding the norms, values, structure and process of the various types of groups into which people organize. The course focuses on applying the scientific method to studying social problems (e.g. poverty, crime, sexism and racism) and basic institutions (i.e. family, government, economy, religion, education). Students will develop their "sociological imagination" as a way of understanding what their lives are and can be in relation to the larger social forces at work in local, national, and international environments.

Major Area (28 hours)

  • PUAD 420 - PUBLIC & NONPROFIT FISCAL ADMINISTATION (4)

    PUAD 420

    PUBLIC & NONPROFIT FISCAL ADMINISTATION

    Course Description

    Students learn fundamental budgeting, accounting, and financial management concepts and techniques necessary for planning, analysis, and decision making in public and nonprofit organizations. Students also examine the competing values and politics that underlie and impact the budget process and financial decisions. Finally, students apply skills for effectively communicating financial analysis methods and conclusions with colleagues, elected officials, the media, and the public.
  • SEMT 322 - ETHICS & LEADERSHIP IN SAFETY, SECURITYyAND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCIES (4)

    SEMT 322

    ETHICS & LEADERSHIP IN SAFETY, SECURITYyAND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCIES

    Course Description

    This course will study ethics and leadership theories in the context of public safety agencies. Consideration of leadership skills and traits in both the strategic and tactical settings will be considered. Ethics will be considered in terms of creating a culture of ethics within a public safety agency.
  • SEMT 326 - SECURITY OPERATIONS THEORY AND PRACTICE (4)

    SEMT 326

    SECURITY OPERATIONS THEORY AND PRACTICE

    Course Description

    This course will provide insight into the history, theory, and principles of security operations in private and industrial settings.
  • SEMT 328 - EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT THEORY & PRACTICE (4)

    SEMT 328

    EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT THEORY & PRACTICE

    Course Description

    This course will focus on Emergency Management and Homeland Security in the Post 9-11 era. Emphasis will be on mitigation and preparedness related to international and domestic terrorism as well as natural disasters.
  • SEMT 424 - LABOR RELATIONS AND PUBLIC SECTORyBARGAINING (4)

    SEMT 424

    LABOR RELATIONS AND PUBLIC SECTORyBARGAINING

    Course Description

    This course will involve the study of collective bargaining in the public sector, including management and labor relations, public sector bargaining law, and related labor issues particular to public safety agencies.
  • SEMT 432 - HOMELAND SECURITY - THEORY AND PRACTICEyAT THE LOCAL LEVEL (4)

    SEMT 432

    HOMELAND SECURITY - THEORY AND PRACTICEyAT THE LOCAL LEVEL

    Course Description

    This course will study the impact of Department of Homeland Security requirements on local public safety agencies. Focus will be on interoperability as it relates to planning and responding to terrorist threats or actions at the local level.
  • SEMT 495 - SAFETY, SECURITY, AND EMERGENCYyMANAGEMENT CAPSTONE (4)

    SEMT 495

    SAFETY, SECURITY, AND EMERGENCYyMANAGEMENT CAPSTONE

    Course Description

    This course serves as the capstone experience for the Safety, Security, and Emergency Management degree. Students will apply knowledge, skills, and abilities learned from course work completed in the SEMT program by completing a comprehensive capstone project. The comprehensive project will be applicable to the student's particular area of interest related to safety, security, and emergency management.

Major Electives (8 hours)

Select 8 hours from:

  • PSMT 315 - CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN PUBLIC SAFETYyMANAGEMENT (4)

    PSMT 315

    CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN PUBLIC SAFETYyMANAGEMENT

    Course Description

    This course provides an overview of selected topical areas of continuing interest and importance to public safety agencies.
  • SEMT 410 - SAFETY, SECURITY, AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP (1 - 4)

    SEMT 410

    SAFETY, SECURITY, AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP

    Course Description

    The Internship provides qualified students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for supervised professional training and experience in an agency with a Safety, Security, or Emergency Management mission.
  • SEMT 436 - RISK MANAGEMENT AND THREAT ASSESSMENT (4)

    SEMT 436

    RISK MANAGEMENT AND THREAT ASSESSMENT

    Course Description

    This course will involve the study of risk management techniques and methods for safety and security purposes. Threat assessment will be studied in terms of private and corporate security concerns.
  • SEMT 438 - PRINCIPLES OF SECURITY MANAGEMENT (4)

    SEMT 438

    PRINCIPLES OF SECURITY MANAGEMENT

    Course Description

    This course examines the principles involved in leading and managing private security operations. Areas covered in this class will include leadership, supervision, and a range of personnel issues, including staffing and training, as they pertain to private security operations.
  • SEMT 480 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN SAFETY, SECURITY, AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT (1 - 4)

    SEMT 480

    SPECIAL TOPICS IN SAFETY, SECURITY, AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

    Course Description

    This is a variable content course in Safety, Security, and Emergency Management. Students pursue topics or subjects of current interests that are not part of the regular curriculum. A specific course description will be published in the Course Schedule for the trimester the course is offered.
  • SEMT 499 - INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN SAFETY, SECURITYyAND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT (1 - 4)

    SEMT 499

    INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN SAFETY, SECURITYyAND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

    Course Description

    Independent course studies allow students in good academic standing to pursue learning in areas not covered by the regular curriculum or to extend study in areas presently taught. Study is under faculty supervision and graded on either a Pass/No Credit or a letter grade basis. (See the "Independent Studies" section of the Academic Bulletin for details.)

Additional Requirements

Each candidate for a subsequent degree must successfully complete in residence at Franklin University a minimum of 30 credit hours of 200 level courses or above, of which a minimum of 16 credit hours must be in major area courses at the 300 or 400 level. If the student is a previous Franklin bachelor of science degree graduate, the 30 credits must be earned after the first Franklin B.S. degree was awarded. If the required courses for a subsequent degree total less than 30 credit hours, the student may take Free Elective courses to achieve residency. Either PF 121 or PF 321 must be taken prior to the first BLF course, or it may be taken concurrently with the first 15-week BLF course. Students also must meet the University algebra competency requirement

A minimum GPA of 2.25 is required in the major area, and each major area course must be completed with a grade of “C” or better to count toward degree requirements.

Please see the Academic Bulletin for the complete list of degree and residency requirements.

Additional Curriculum

Emergency Management & Homeland Security - Bachelor of Science Degree

View Curriculum

Build well-rounded skills and learn the industry specific knowledge you will need to be successful in your career.

Similar Majors

Not the program you were looking for?

Check out these other popular, related majors and find your best degree program fit at Franklin.

View All Majors

Franklin is for you. Find out why.

Learn about our flexible class
scheduling, affordable tuition, and
history educating adult learners.

Learn More About Franklin