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Health Sciences

Program OverviewProgram DetailsWhy Choose Franklin
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Major Electives Course Descriptions

Cultural Diversity

ANTH 215 - CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
This course exposes students to the principles, concepts, research methods, and applications of cultural anthropology. Students will be introduced to the wide range of variation in social and institutional arrangements found historically and cross-culturally. From language to gender roles, from bases of social stratification to causes and consequences of conformity, from the simpler life in foraging societies to the seeming-chaos in modern post-industrial societies: students will examine the enormous variation in solutions to the requisites of social life.
COMM 400 - INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION
This course provides an overview of issues, processes, and theories involved with communicating with individuals from different cultures. Topics include thinking and communicating in global contexts and professional relationships in diverse environments.
SOCL 310 - DIVERSITY IN THE WORKPLACE
This course explores the spectrum of cultural diversity and its consequences within the workplace. While the focus is on the American workplace, some cross-cultural material is examined in relation to current trends toward globalization and multinational corporations. Important themes running throughout the course relate to recognizing and actualizing the benefits of cultural diversity in the workplace as coworkers and leaders minimize the misunderstandings that frequently accompany diversity.
SOCL 400 - SOCIAL JUSTICE
This course explores the types of cultural diversity in society and the effects such diversity has on attitudes, values, beliefs, behavior, and life chances. Human beings vary by many dimensions including race/ethnicity, national origin, sex and sexual orientation, gender and gender orientation, social class, age, religion, and more. Students will explore the nature of inequality as a socially constructed consequence of diversity, the nature of social and institutional strategies that maintain such inequality, and how social arrangements may be altered to mitigate against this inequality for individual as well as social benefit.

Emergency Planning

SEMT 240 - DISASTER PLANNING & RESPONSE
Students will explore the nuances of planning for and responding to catastrophic disasters. The course will involve discussion of domestic and international approaches to planning and responding to such disasters. Students will view issues from the perspective of an Emergency Manager who spends most of their time in the field planning for critical incidents and disasters and who understands the key components to a good plan that involves many agencies at all levels of government and at different stages of the event. Students will explore the logistics of mass care, mass evacuation, and critical infrastructure damage.
SEMT 328 - EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT THEORY & PRACTICE
This course will focus on Emergency Management and Homeland Security in the Post 9-11 era. Emphasis will be on mitigation and preparedness related to international and domestic terrorism as well as natural disasters.
SEMT 335 - INTRODUCTION TO EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT & HOMELAND SECURITY
This course analyzes emergency management from a historical perspective. Disaster planning and disaster management in the post 9-11 environment are analyzed. The impact of Homeland Security on local public safety agencies is examined as are selected Homeland Security Presidential Directives (HSPD #5 and HSPD #11 in particular). The National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the National Response Plan (NRP) are examined with regard to their impact on local public safety agencies. Finally, special challenges for emergency management and disaster response will be analyzed.
SEMT 450 - CRITICAL INCIDENT MANAGEMENT
The course will explore the NIMS, ICS, and other federally mandated systems in place for the management of critical incidents such as major fire scenes, major disasters, terrorist attacks, and other events that require a multi-agency response and recovery effort. The course discusses and evaluates the roles of high-level leadership in setting policy direction and planning as well as real-time management of the scene.

Health Informatics

HIM 320 - HEALTH DATA
This course introduces students to various types, definitions, relationships, uses, and interpretations of data derived from healthcare functions and processes. Students will explore information standards and representations of health data that are commonly used for patient care, reporting, reimbursement, and quality improvement programs.
HIM 350 - HEALTH INFORMATICS
This course will cover the history of health informatics, design and challenges of informatics infrastructure, and current issues. Topics will include HIPAA and other legislation, application of electronic health records, and other clinical and administrative applications of health information systems.
HIM 470 - HEALTH INFORMATION SYSTEMS
This course examines healthcare organizations from the perspective of managing the information systems that exist within the enterprise. Identifying the clinical and healthcare delivery processes and how they relate to information systems is a main focus. The intent of the course is to identify the key issues confronting the management of healthcare information systems today, examine their causes, and develop reasonable solutions to these issues. Specific federal regulations, vendor solutions, and financial implications as they relate to healthcare information systems are also examined.
HIM 702 - HEALTH INFORMATION GOVERNANCE
This course covers the broad spectrum of strategic issues in healthcare including policies, guidelines, standards, processes, and controls required to manage and implement enterprise-level information. Treating information as a strategic asset to healthcare organizations, processes to manage various risks to the quality of information and ensure its appropriate use are covered.

Healthcare Management

HCM 300 - HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT
This course provides students with an overview of concepts and issues related to healthcare leadership. It is generally a required course for any subsequent healthcare management courses. Through the examination of management topics and healthcare situations, the student will explore the skills and knowledge needed to be successful in a diverse healthcare environment. Topics include healthcare leadership, organizational design as it relates to the uniqueness of healthcare organizations, managing professionals, and diversity in the workplace.
HCM 422 - HEALTHCARE OUTCOMES & QUALITY MANAGEMENT
This course will explore the essential principles and techniques of quality improvement applied to patient care and the management of services in healthcare organizations. The importance of quality management in leadership of organizations will be emphasized. Topics include fundamentals of quality management, system thinking and goal setting, improvement theories, data collection, statistical tools, medical errors and reporting, public perceptions and organizational accountability.
HCM 442 - LEGAL ASPECTS OF HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT
Individuals in the healthcare industry face ever changing legal and ethical trends in their environment. Practitioners, therefore, need to develop specific skills to evolve into the role of a change agent in order to manage these trends. This course will provide the student with the skills necessary to mitigate liability through risk management principles, develop relationship management skills, apply an ethical decision-making framework, incorporate employment law procedures, and manage communication.
MGMT 325 - ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR
This course focuses on the organizational processes and theoretical constructs related to organizational behavior. The roles of leaders, followers, and teams and their influence on the culture and performance of an organization are addressed through the analysis of key organizational behavior concepts and related cases. Topics will include: values, perception, attitudes, assumptions, learning, motivation, conflict, diversity, and change. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.

Risk Management & Insurance

ACCT 215 - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING
An introduction to accounting emphasizing how general purpose financial statements communicate information about the business corporation's performance and position for users external to management. Approximately one third of the course emphasizes how the accountant processes and presents the information and includes exposure to recording transactions, adjusting balances and preparing financial statements for service and merchandise firms according to established rules and procedures. The balance of the course examines major elements of the statements such as cash, receivables, inventory, long'lived assets, depreciation, payroll, bonds, and other liabilities and stocks. Concepts of this course are applied to Managerial Accounting (ACCT 225). Students are advised to avoid any time lapse between these courses.
HCM 432 - HEALTHCARE FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT II
An extension of Healthcare Financial Management I, this course offers an advanced and in-depth look at how healthcare managers can apply financial management theory and principles learned in Healthcare Financial Management I to make sound decisions in an ever changing healthcare economic climate. The course will be supplemented by case studies which will focus on topics contained in the course.
RMI 300 - PRINCIPLES OF RISK MANAGEMENT & INSURANCE
This course introduces students to the general concepts of risk identification and management, as well as how various products and methods, including insurance, can be used to manage the non-speculative risks of individuals and businesses. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing various types of insurance products, including life, health, property, and liability insurance contracts, and how the insurance industry develops, manages, markets, and underwrites such contracts in a complex economic and regulatory environment.
RMI 430 - INDIVIDUAL & GROUP LIFE & HEALTH INSURANCE
This course analyzes the uses of individual and group life and health insurance to manage the financial risks that illness, incapacity, and death pose to individuals and organizations. It includes a review of various health and life insurance products and their utility in addressing specific needs and situations, as well as the underwriting and operational mechanisms that insurers employ in providing such products.

The above list of courses only represents a portion of the courses required for a bachelor's degree. View the bachelor's degree full curriculum.

Additional Course Descriptions

Professional Core

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