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Health Sciences

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Professional Core Course Descriptions

COMM 355 - INTRODUCTION TO GRANT WRITING FOR NON-PROFITS

This course will enable students to recognize when a grant might be appropriate as a source of funds for a non-profit organization or project, identify and understand non-profit status, adhere to conventions and standards associated with successful grant applications, locate grant opportunities, analyze grant requirements, prepare metrics for success, and develop a written grant proposal. This course will provide an opportunity for students to extend and apply their communication skills. Students pursuing this course will also leverage interdisciplinary insights to solve a real-world problem.

GRAD 685 - GRADUATE STUDIES: INTEGRATIVE FIELD EXPERIENCE

This course allows students to synthesize connections between academic learning and experiences in the field by identifying a real world problem and addressing it during the field experience. This course integrates internships, service learning, civic engagement, and other valid field experiences so that students learn to transfer skills, abilities, theories, methodologies, and/or paradigms to their academic discipline. Additionally students will achieve ethical, social, and intellectual growth through the exploration of complex issues.

HIM 150 - MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

This course will introduce the foundations of medical terminology nomenclature and use. Emphasis will be on the fundamentals of prefix, word root, and suffix linkages to build a broad medical vocabulary.

PF 485 - PROFESSIONAL FOUNDATIONS INTEGRATIVE FIELD EXPERIENCE

This course allows students to synthesize connections between academic learning and experiences in the field by identifying a real-world problem and addressing it during a field experience. This course integrates internships, service learning, civic engagement, and other valid field experiences so that students learn to transfer skills, abilities, theories, and methodologies to their academic discipline. Additionally, students will achieve ethical, social, and intellectual growth through the exploration of complex issues.

PUAD 305 - INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

Students are introduced to the field and profession of public administration. Students learn to think and act as ethical public administration professionals by developing a broad understanding of the political and organizational environment in which public administrators work and by applying fundamental analytical, decision- making, and communication skills. The professional knowledge and skills explored in the course provide a foundation for subsequent public administration courses.

PUBH 201 - INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HEALTH

This course provides a basic introduction to public health concepts and practice by examining the philosophy, purpose, history, organization, functions, tools, activities and results of public health practice at the national, state, and community levels. The course also examines public health occupations and careers. Case studies and a variety of practice-related exercises serve as a basis for learner participation in practical public health problem-solving simulations.

SOCL 335 - APPLIED RESEARCH METHODS

Applied Research Methods introduces students to foundational issues of social scientific research - that is, research entailing the application of the scientific method to the study of human behavior. Students will examine the strengths and weaknesses of major quantitative and qualitative data collection techniques as well as the processes involved in planning and executing such projects and the standards of evaluating the quality of data.

SOCL 355 - COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH

This course explores the social context of mental health treatment and delivery of mental health care. The delivery of mental health care is rife with public policy debates stemming from the diversity of opinion among policy makers, treatment specialists, consumers of mental health care and their families, for-profit entities such as pharmaceutical companies, and the public. Debates that highlight this course include but are not limited to the following: the proper role of medication in mental health care, balancing patients' rights with the desire for public safety, influence of the Affordable Care Act on mental health diagnosis and treatment, and differences between mental health care in Ohio and that found in other locales.

The above list of courses only represents a portion of the courses required for a bachelor's degree. View the bachelor's degree full curriculum.

Additional Course Descriptions

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