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Human Resources Management Degree Program

Human Resources Management Degree - Online HR Degree Program
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Human Resource Management - Bachelor of Science Degree

124 Semester Hours

Fundamental General Education Core (24 hours)

All courses must be at the 100 or 200 level

English Composition

Choose a minimum of 3 semester hours from:

  • WRIT 120 - COLLEGE WRITING (4)

    WRIT 120

    COLLEGE WRITING

    Course Description

    In this course, students acquire the writing competence necessary for conducting and presenting research. A variety of assignments, beginning with personal reflections, build upon one another, as students develop ideas that respond to, critique, and synthesize the positions of others. Students systematize and organize knowledge in ways that will help them in all of their courses. The course also emphasizes the elements of good writing style, appropriate grammar and mechanics, clarity of language, and logical and cohesive development. It culminates in submission of a documented research paper.
Mathematics

Choose a minimum of three semester hours from:

  • MATH 160 - COLLEGE ALGEBRA (4)

    MATH 160

    COLLEGE ALGEBRA

    Course Description

    This course is designed to prepare students for Applied Calculus and Discrete Mathematics and to provide the mathematical background needed for the analytic reasoning used in other courses. Topics include functions and their graphs, including exponential and logarithmic functions; complex numbers; systems of equations and inequalities; matrices; basic principles of counting and probability; and other selected topics.
  • MATH 180 - APPLIED CALCULUS (4)

    MATH 180

    APPLIED CALCULUS

    Course Description

    This course is designed to meet the needs of the Computer Science Program. Topics include limits, the derivative, rules for differentiation, graphing strategy, optimization problems, differentials, implicit differentiation, related rates, exponential and logarithmic functions, antiderivatives, definite integrals, areas, and methods of integration. Applications are emphasized.
  • MATH 210 - FINITE MATHEMATICS (4)

    MATH 210

    FINITE MATHEMATICS

    Course Description

    This course includes such topics as matrices, solutions of simultaneous linear equations using matrix methods, graphic and simplex solutions to linear programming problems, set theory, counting problems (including permutations and combinations), probability theory (including Bayes' theorem), Markov chains, and the mathematics of finance. Game theory may be discussed if time permits. Applications in business, economics, and management are emphasized.
  • MATH 215 - STATISTICAL CONCEPTS (4)

    MATH 215

    STATISTICAL CONCEPTS

    Course Description

    This course introduces the student to statistics with business applications. The course covers both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics included are: measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion; graphical displays of data; linear regression; basic probability concepts; binomial and normal probability distributions; confidence intervals; and hypothesis testing. These topics will be covered using a basic knowledge of algebra and Microsoft Excel.
  • MATH 220 - BUSINESS CALCULUS (4)

    MATH 220

    BUSINESS CALCULUS

    Course Description

    This course may not be taken by students who previously received calculus credit. Topics include limits, the derivative, rules for differentiation, graphing strategy, optimization problems, differentials, implicit differentiation, related rates, exponential and logarithmic functions, antiderivatives, definite integrals, areas, and methods of integration. Applications in business, economics, and management are emphasized. This course should be taken as soon as possible after acquiring the necessary algebra skills and concepts, preferably within the first 60 hours of any degree program.
Sciences

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

  • SCIE 112 - INTRO/HUMAN BIOLOGY (4)

    SCIE 112

    INTRO/HUMAN BIOLOGY

    Course Description

    SCIE 112 is a four credit hour lecture-based course designed to provide the student with a basic knowledge and understanding of human biology with an emphasis on the impact of science in everyday life. Topics include: chemistry of living things, cell structure and function, genetics and inheritance, cellular reproduction, and the basic anatomy and physiology of major organ systems in the human body.
  • SCIE 114 - EARTH SCIENCE (4)

    SCIE 114

    EARTH SCIENCE

    Course Description

    Earth Science is a four credit hour course that consists of three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of laboratory components. Earth Science is a survey course that provides an overview of geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy. Topics covered will focus on the materials that make up the Earth, the changes that occur both on the surface and in the interior of the Earth, and the forces and processes that are responsible for these changes. In order to pass the course, students must receive an average score of 60% on the laboratory component of the course, in addition to achieving the total number of points prescribed in the syllabus.
  • SCIE 131 - ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (4)

    SCIE 131

    ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

    Course Description

    Environmental Science is a four credit hour course that consists of three credit hour lecture and one credit hour laboratory components. Environmental Science is an introductory course that explores Earth's natural systems and how human activity affects the environment. Topics covered include food and agriculture, population dynamics, urbanization, resource use and depletion, pollution, environmental health, and sustainability. In order to pass the course, students must receive an average score of 60% on the laboratory component of the course, in addition to achieving the total number of points prescribed in the syllabus.
  • SCIE 200 - SCIENCE AND SOCIETY (2)

    SCIE 200

    SCIENCE AND SOCIETY

    Course Description

    Science and Society is a two credit hour lecture based course that seeks to explore and understand the ways that science and technology shape the daily lives of humans. We will examine the nature of science and investigate the current controversies over issues in science and technology, so that informed choices among competing scientific, technological, and political and social priorities can be made.
  • SCIE 210 - UNDERSTANDING SCIENCE: PRINCIPLES,yPRACTICE, & THEORY (2)

    SCIE 210

    UNDERSTANDING SCIENCE: PRINCIPLES,yPRACTICE, & THEORY

    Course Description

    Understanding Science: Principles, Practice & Theory is a two credit hour course that introduces students to the major themes, processes, and methods common to all scientific disciplines. Students will develop critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate all kinds of phenomena, scientific, pseudoscientific, and other. The focus is on the nature of science so students will develop an understanding of how science works and develop an appreciation for the process by which we gain scientific knowledge.
  • SCIE 211 - INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC ANALYSIS &yREASONING (4)

    SCIE 211

    INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC ANALYSIS &yREASONING

    Course Description

    Introduction to Scientific Analysis and Reasoning is a four credit hour course consisting of three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of laboratory. This course is an introduction to critical thinking on statistical and scientific claims. The student will develop the critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate popular sources of (mis)information and to better understand and evaluate all sorts of scientific claims and arguments. The focus of the course is on students developing thoughtful and critical use of scientific information and research to be able to separate truth from deception and make decisions that affect their personal lives and roles as informed and engaged citizens.
Social and Behavioral Sciences

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

  • ANTH 215 - CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4)

    ANTH 215

    CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY

    Course Description

    This course exposes students to the principles, concepts, research methods, and applications of cultural anthropology. Students will be introduced to the wide range of variation in social and institutional arrangements found historically and cross-culturally. From language to gender roles, from bases of social stratification to causes and consequences of conformity, from the simpler life in foraging societies to the seeming-chaos in modern post-industrial societies: students will examine the enormous variation in solutions to the requisites of social life.
  • ECON 210 - INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS (4)

    ECON 210

    INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS

    Course Description

    An introduction to economic theory involving the examination of how decision making by firms and individuals is shaped by economic forces. Emphasis is placed on demand, supply, market equilibrium analysis, and basic market structure models. The invisible hand as the driving force for economic decisions as well as market externalities are discussed. The class concentrates on providing a balanced approach to studying economic agents' behavior and the global implications and outcomes.
  • ECON 220 - INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS (4)

    ECON 220

    INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS

    Course Description

    An introduction to economic theory involving the basic underlying causes and principles of the operation of an economic system. Emphasis is placed on studying the economy as a whole. Issues of inflation, unemployment, taxation, business cycles and growth are discussed in the context of the global economic system.
  • PSYC 110 - GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY (4)

    PSYC 110

    GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY

    Course Description

    A survey of the various fields of study comprising modern scientific psychology. The course examines the theories, research findings, and applications in each of the major areas of psychology, with the goal of providing students with practice information they can apply to their personal and professional lives. The topic areas covered in the course include learning and memory, motivation and emotion, human development, theories of personality, psychopathology, and social behavior.
  • PSYC 204 - PRINCIPLES OF MOTIVATION (4)

    PSYC 204

    PRINCIPLES OF MOTIVATION

    Course Description

    This course is a systematic study of various theories and approaches to work motivation, with assessments of the research and practice evidence supporting their scientific validity and applicability to the work environment. Students will explore factors that contribute to motivation and strategies that today's manager can use to become a successful motivator.
  • SOCL 110 - INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (4)

    SOCL 110

    INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

    Course Description

    Sociology is the scientific study of group behavior - whether the groups are dyads, small groups, associations, bureaucracies, societies, publics, aggregates, social movements, or mobs, etc. This introductory course introduces the student to sociological principles and theoretical perspectives that facilitate understanding the norms, values, structure and process of the various types of groups into which people organize. The course focuses on applying the scientific method to studying social problems (e.g. poverty, crime, sexism and racism) and basic institutions (i.e. family, government, economy, religion, education). Students will develop their "sociological imagination" as a way of understanding what their lives are and can be in relation to the larger social forces at work in local, national, and international environments.
  • PUAD 295 - AMERICAN GOVERNMENT IN ACTION (4)

    PUAD 295

    AMERICAN GOVERNMENT IN ACTION

    Course Description

    The course examines the American system of government and how government affects and interacts with individuals and organizations in society. Students learn how politics, law, and the structure and principles of American government impact citizens, public policy, and the administration of public and private organizations. Students apply fundamental political theories and administration law principles in personal and professional contexts.
Arts and Humanities

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

  • HUMN 210 - INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC & CRITICALyTHINKING SKILLS (2)

    HUMN 210

    INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC & CRITICALyTHINKING SKILLS

    Course Description

    The goal of this course is to help you improve as a critical, logical thinker. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. You will discover how to apply these valuable skills to your studies and everyday life, learning how to overcome obstacles to critical thinking, and how to avoid being deceived by means of misleading reasoning.
  • HUMN 211 - INTRO TO ETHICAL ANALYSIS AND REASONING (2)

    HUMN 211

    INTRO TO ETHICAL ANALYSIS AND REASONING

    Course Description

    The goal of this course is to help you improve your ethical analysis and reasoning skills. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing ethical arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. In this course, you will discover how to apply the following questions to your job and everyday life. Why do we need ethics if we have laws to govern our behavior? Does the majority view determine what is ethical and what is not? Are feelings, desires, and preferences reliable ethical guides? Is it ever appropriate to criticize another individual's (or culture's) ethical judgment? Are people always responsible for their actions? Do human beings have a natural tendency to good, a natural tendency to evil? both? neither? Is there a single moral code that is binding on all people, at all times, and in all places?
  • HUMN 218 - WORLD RELIGIONS (4)

    HUMN 218

    WORLD RELIGIONS

    Course Description

    A comparative study of the founders, sacred writings, beliefs and practices of some of the major world religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Islam, Judaism and Christianity. This course enables the student to study and compare the leading religions of the world in light of their historical and cultural backgrounds. Students will be encouraged to explore faith traditions other than their own. Common themes across religions, spiritual practice, and current related cultural and political issues will also be considered.
  • HUMN 232 - INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE (4)

    HUMN 232

    INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE

    Course Description

    In this course, students will analyze works from the three major literary genres: poetry, drama, and fiction. Students will become familiar with standard vocabulary and approaches specific to the field of literary criticism and consider the importance of literature in contemporary society. The goal of this course is to encourage students to read for pleasure (engage with the text on an emotional level) while also moving towards a more objective consideration of literature by introducing the fundamentals of close reading and literary analysis.
  • HUMN 240 - POPULAR CULTURE (4)

    HUMN 240

    POPULAR CULTURE

    Course Description

    An introductory course that examines basic concepts in popular culture studies and the role popular arts and artifacts play in shaping cultural values. The course covers basic theories and approaches to topics like best sellers, popular music, popular art forms, cultural heroes from the sports and entertainment worlds and other popular phenomena.
  • HUMN 246 - FILM APPRECIATION (4)

    HUMN 246

    FILM APPRECIATION

    Course Description

    This course is an introduction to the art of film intended to enable students to become more knowledgeable, appreciative and critical viewers. The course covers the major areas of film: narrative, documentary, animated and experimental. While some film history is covered, this course emphasizes understanding key elements in the filmmaking process: scripting, filming, editing, acting, directing, promoting and distributing. Students will be required to view and write critical reviews of films screened both in and out of class.
Learn More About General Education

Additional General Education Requirements (26 hours)

  • COMP 106 - INTRODUCTION TO SPREADSHEETS (1)

    COMP 106

    INTRODUCTION TO SPREADSHEETS

    Course Description

    This course focuses on using spreadsheets to solve business applications.
  • COMP 108 - INTRODUCTION TO DATABASES (1)

    COMP 108

    INTRODUCTION TO DATABASES

    Course Description

    This course focuses on using databases to solve business applications.
  • ECON 220 - INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS (4)

    ECON 220

    INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS

    Course Description

    An introduction to economic theory involving the basic underlying causes and principles of the operation of an economic system. Emphasis is placed on studying the economy as a whole. Issues of inflation, unemployment, taxation, business cycles and growth are discussed in the context of the global economic system.
    1
  • HUMN 305 - GLOBAL ISSUES (4)

    HUMN 305

    GLOBAL ISSUES

    Course Description

    This course provides students with a coherent sense of the past and present human societies drawn from five cultural areas: Asia, Africa, Europe, North America and South America. It also reviews the diversity of traditions that have formed the world and continue to interact in it today. Through the synthesis of connections, influences and parallels among cultures, students will gain an understanding of how to communicate in a culturally diverse world.
  • MATH 215 - STATISTICAL CONCEPTS (4)

    MATH 215

    STATISTICAL CONCEPTS

    Course Description

    This course introduces the student to statistics with business applications. The course covers both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics included are: measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion; graphical displays of data; linear regression; basic probability concepts; binomial and normal probability distributions; confidence intervals; and hypothesis testing. These topics will be covered using a basic knowledge of algebra and Microsoft Excel.
    2
  • PF 321 - LEARNING STRATEGIES (2)

    PF 321

    LEARNING STRATEGIES

    Course Description

    This course prepares students to be successful lifelong learners both academically and in their chosen careers. Franklin courses require a high level of self-directed learning and focus on skills required in the workplace and the classroom that are easily transferable between the two environments. The course includes strategies for advancing communication skills, including the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments. The assignments and activities in the course are created to closely simulate teamwork found in the workplace.
  • SPCH 100 - SPEECH COMMUNICATION (4)

    SPCH 100

    SPEECH COMMUNICATION

    Course Description

    A basic public speaking course intended to improve the student's ability to think critically and to communicate orally. Theory and practice are provided in various speaking situations. Each student is required to speak before an audience, but class work also involves reading, gathering and organizing information, writing and listening.

    OR COMM 150 - INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION (4)

    COMM 150

    INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION

    Course Description

    By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking.
  • WRIT 320 - BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WRITING (4)

    WRIT 320

    BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WRITING

    Course Description

    This is an advanced composition course for juniors and seniors which focuses on business, technical and professional writing. Skills taught include audience analysis; research methods; questionnaire, interview and survey techniques; letters; data collection, interpretation and documentation; graphic illustration; and composition of reports in special formats. Instruction and practice are provided in writing various types of reports such as r‚sum‚s, proposals, summaries, research reports and instructions for user manuals, and in presenting committee and oral reports. Students will be encouraged to relate course materials to their major programs and their workplaces.
  • General Education Electives (2)
1 Select another Social Science elective if ECON 220 is used in the Fundamental General Educational Core.
2 Select another General Education Elective if MATH 215 is used in the Fundamental General Education Core.

Business Core (28 hours)

  • ACCT 215 - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (4)

    ACCT 215

    FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

    Course Description

    An introduction to accounting emphasizing how general purpose financial statements communicate information about the business corporation?s performance and position for users external to management. Approximately one third of the course emphasizes how the accountant processes and presents the information and includes exposure to recording transactions, adjusting balances and preparing financial statements for service and merchandise firms according to established rules and procedures. The balance of the course examines major elements of the statements such as cash, receivables, inventory, long?lived assets, depreciation, payroll, bonds, and other liabilities and stocks. Concepts of this course are applied to Managerial Accounting (ACCT 225). Students are advised to avoid any time lapse between these courses.
  • ACCT 225 - MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (4)

    ACCT 225

    MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING

    Course Description

    The study of management accounting for internal reporting and decision-making. The course introduces a business-management approach to the development and use of accounting information. Major topics include cost behavior, cost analysis, profit planning and control measures. Accounting for decentralized operations, capital budgeting decisions, and ethical challenges in managerial accounting are also covered.
  • BSAD 220 - BUSINESS LAW (4)

    BSAD 220

    BUSINESS LAW

    Course Description

    A study of the everyday legal problems encountered in business with emphasis on the areas of legal procedure, contracts, agency, employment law, business organizations and torts, with cases relating to these and other areas.
  • ECON 210 - INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS (4)

    ECON 210

    INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS

    Course Description

    An introduction to economic theory involving the examination of how decision making by firms and individuals is shaped by economic forces. Emphasis is placed on demand, supply, market equilibrium analysis, and basic market structure models. The invisible hand as the driving force for economic decisions as well as market externalities are discussed. The class concentrates on providing a balanced approach to studying economic agents' behavior and the global implications and outcomes.
  • FINA 301 - PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE (4)

    FINA 301

    PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE

    Course Description

    This course is designed to survey the field of finance and provide the foundation for more advanced finance coursework. Topics include sources of business and financial information, financial statement analysis, the time value of money, the nature and measurement of risk, financial institutions, investments and corporate finance.
  • MGMT 312 - PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (4)

    MGMT 312

    PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT

    Course Description

    This course explores the basic concepts and processes of management. Students will explore the functional roles and processes of planning, leading, organizing, and controlling comprising the manager role. Students develop skills related to the manager function and required in today's competitive environment.
  • MKTG 300 - MARKETING (4)

    MKTG 300

    MARKETING

    Course Description

    A general course in marketing theory and methods. Among topics discussed are the importance of marketing, the interrelationship of the different phases of marketing, the differences between the marketing of goods and services, wholesaling, retailing, pricing strategies, analysis of markets, and distribution.

University Electives (18 hours)

  • Any undergraduate courses offered by the University except developmental education courses.

Major Area (24 hours)

  • HRM 300 - HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (4)

    HRM 300

    HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT

    Course Description

    An introduction to the human resources function and related elements and activities. The course outlines the roles and functions of members of the human resources department, as well as educating others outside human resources, in how their roles include human resources-related activities. The student will learn about the evolution in human resources management as we know it today. Emphasis is placed on the modern day importance of HRM and the new "corporate view" of the function. Additionally, the student will be exposed to the view of HRM from the perception of both management and subordinate employees. The importance of maintaining fair and equitable compensation and benefit programs will be discussed. The student will be exposed to practical situations and problem solving regarding areas of employee counseling, discipline and termination. Equal Employment Opportunity will be discussed in order for the student to understand its need, importance and the legal issues surrounding it. Other critical areas of training and development, staffing and strategy will also be explored.
  • HRM 301 - STAFFING (4)

    HRM 301

    STAFFING

    Course Description

    This course examines all aspects of getting employees into organizations. Recruitment and selection are the foci. This course covers scientific and legal issues from a managerial perspective and examines the usefulness of various methods used in job analysis, testing and measurement, and internal and external market analysis. Legislation regarding EEO and affirmative action programs are discussed.
  • HRM 302 - TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT (4)

    HRM 302

    TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT

    Course Description

    This course covers the theories and techniques of training and development from strategic and operational perspectives. Emphasis is placed on employee needs assessment, program design, implementation and evaluation. Learning theories and long-term development for global competitiveness are discussed.
  • HRM 401 - COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS (4)

    HRM 401

    COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS

    Course Description

    This course is an in-depth examination of pay and benefit theories and practices. The course analyzes job evaluation techniques, salary surveys, individual and group performance-based pay, as well as insurance and pension plan administration.
  • HRM 402 - EMPLOYEE AND LABOR RELATIONS (4)

    HRM 402

    EMPLOYEE AND LABOR RELATIONS

    Course Description

    This course evaluates the current environment of employee and labor relations. Students will compare and distinguish the differences between employee relations and labor relations environments. Topics such as handbooks versus contracts, employee discipline versus grievance procedures, and workplace compliance laws, such as ADA, FMLA, sexual harassment, and the Civil Rights Act are discussed.
  • HRM 495 - STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCES CAPSTONE (4)

    HRM 495

    STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCES CAPSTONE

    Course Description

    Capstone course for HRM majors. Investigates the strategic management process from the HR perspective. Topics include strategic HR, strategic alignment, balanced scorecard and competitive strategic analysis. Intensive use of case analysis, including a cross-functional senior practicum with students from Finance, Marketing and Management Information Systems majors.

Major Electives (4 hours)

Select 4 hours from:

  • BSAD 320 - QUANTITATIVE & QUALITATIVE METHODS FORyDECISION MAKING (4)

    BSAD 320

    QUANTITATIVE & QUALITATIVE METHODS FORyDECISION MAKING

    Course Description

    This course focuses on the development of individual and team decision-making and problem solving skills. Real world domestic and global issues will be analyzed, diagnosed, and evaluated through the application of a variety of quantitative and qualitative tools and techniques used to arrive at effective decisions and solutions.
  • BSAD 476 - GLOBAL BUSINESS ISSUES (4)

    BSAD 476

    GLOBAL BUSINESS ISSUES

    Course Description

    This course focuses on global economic integration and emerging market economies and the effects these trends have on both service and manufacturing industries in the short- and long-term. Other global business issues will include: the European Union (EU), North American Free Trade Association (NAFTA), and the World Trade Organization (WTO); environmental considerations in business operations; the influences of the political and legal environment on markets; the strategies for business entry into a global market; and the development of leadership talent in a global setting.
  • ENTR 395 - FOUNDATIONS OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP (4)

    ENTR 395

    FOUNDATIONS OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP

    Course Description

    Foundations of Entrepreneurship is an introductory course that examines the theory, practice, and tools of entrepreneurship. Various entrepreneurship structures and how such structures result in different unique pathways to success are explored. Students will focus on the importance of developing an entrepreneurial mindset as they assess their individual values and determine their affinity for entrepreneurial thinking, while also reviewing the risks and rewards of entrepreneurial businesses in the context of their chosen entrepreneurial philosophy. Finally, students will identify and evaluate opportunities for new ventures, and consider a strategic approach for successful business plan development.
  • HRM 400 - PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT (4)

    HRM 400

    PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT

    Course Description

    This course uses a systems perspective to identify, select, develop, and evaluate solutions to document and improve the performance of individuals, groups, and organizations. Students will learn how to analyze performance problems and make recommendations at the employee, job, and organizational level that will assist the organization and its employees in achieving organizational goals and managing change. Students will also learn how to bridge the gap between organizational strategy, individuals, and departments.
  • HRM 420 - PRINCIPLES OF ORGANIZATIONALyDEVELOPMENT (4)

    HRM 420

    PRINCIPLES OF ORGANIZATIONALyDEVELOPMENT

    Course Description

    This course provides students with an overview of the emergence and development of organizational development as a field, processes for diagnosis and intervention, and basic skills needed to facilitate individual, small group, and organizational change. The course will also cover key concepts in organizational transformation, organizational development in global settings, and future directions in the field.
  • MGMT 425 - ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE (4)

    MGMT 425

    ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE

    Course Description

    This course analyzes the forces that drive organizations to change, examines impediments to change, and surveys a range of approaches for making organizational change more effective. Students will develop an understanding of change processes and develop practical skills for becoming an organization change agent.
  • PSYC 325 - COACHING IN ORGANIZATIONS (4)

    PSYC 325

    COACHING IN ORGANIZATIONS

    Course Description

    This course is designed to introduce students to the use of coaching skills for improving the adjustment and performance of individuals in an organizational setting. Topics to be covered include: the scope of coaching practice, optimal practitioner characteristics, benefits for coaches, related organizational dynamics, and coaching interventions and resources. This course also includes an emphasis on experimental learning through coaching practice activities.

Additional Requirements

  • All students are required to pass College Writing (WRIT 120), either Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121) or Learning Strategies (PF 321) and either Speech Communication (SPCH 100) or Interpersonal Communication (COMM 150) prior to enrolling in any other course at the 200 level or above. Either PF 121 or PF 321 must be taken prior to the first BLF course, or it may be taken concurrently with the first 15-week BLF course. Students who enroll at Franklin with 30 or fewer hours of transfer credit are required to pass Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121) in place of Learning Strategies (PF 321). Students must also meet the University algebra competency requirement.

Please see the Academic Bulletin for the complete list of degree and residency requirements.

Additional Curriculum

Human Resource Management - Subsequent Bachelor of Science Degree

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Looking to earn an additional bachelor’s degree? A subsequent degree is specifically designed for students who have already completed a bachelor's degree or higher.

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