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Information Systems Auditing Degree Program

Information Systems Audit Degree - Information Systems Auditing Program Program OverviewProgram DetailsWhy Choose Franklin
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Major Area Course Descriptions

ACCT 310 - INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I

The first of two in-depth financial accounting courses. Theory, the conceptual framework, development of generally accepted accounting principles, and applications are stressed. Topics include the income statement, the statement of cash flows and the balance sheet, specifically asset accounts.

ACCT 320 - INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II

The second of two in-depth financial accounting courses. Theory, concepts and applications are stressed. Topics include time value of money, current and non-current liabilities, leases, deferred taxes, retirement benefits, stockholders' equity, earning per share, accounting changes and errors, and statement of cash flows.

ACCT 425 - ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS

This course creates a framework for accounting information systems by combining knowledge about business as it relates to information systems, information technology, and accounting. Students will examine the REA enterprise ontology as it relates to databases which can be used to store and retrieve information for decision-making within an organization. Students learn that in the competitive organizations of today, and tomorrow, accountants cannot simply prepare and report information; they must take a more active role in understanding and creating systems and processes that impact the organization's bottom line.

ACCT 470 - AUDITING

A study of the planning, evidence gathering, internal control review, sampling, and application of procedures used to audit assets, liabilities, equity and related income statement accounts of a profit-oriented enterprise. Includes an evaluation of the audit profession including professional standards, ethics and liability of CPAs. Also includes a student-prepared audit case for hands-on application of audit procedures. The reporting requirements for compilation and review services and a thorough study of the types of audit opinions will also be studied. In addition, an audit research paper is required.

ISA 495 - INFORMATION SYSTEMS AUDIT AND CONTROL

This course will culminate the Bachelor of Science in Information Systems Auditing program by drawing from and synthesizing concepts from both the MIS and Accounting fields in order to address issues related specifically to the audit of information systems and technology.

ISEC 300 - PRINCIPLES OF INFORMATION SECURITY

In a highly connected, data intensive, and cost-focused business environment, the practice of information security not a business advantage; it is a customer requirement. Viruses, malware, trojans, denial of service attacks, phishing, and even Wiki leaks have become headline news. Failure to insure the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of data costs companies millions, if not billions of dollars in legal settlements, lost business, and trade secrets. In this breadth-based course, you will get an overview of information security principles and practices, including security models, risk management, access controls, intrusion detection and prevention, cryptography, software vulnerabilities, and ethical issues. Subsequent courses expand on this foundational material in much greater depth.

MIS 310 - INFORMATION SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE & TECHNOLOGY

This course provides a conceptual survey of general systems theory followed by a conceptual and technological survey of the structure of distributed information systems architectures, operating systems, network operating systems, peripheral technology and user interfaces. Interoperability between these architectural components will be explored and current technology and trends in each architectural element will be reviewed. This course will de-emphasize, although not ignore, mainframe architectures in favor of information architectures more applicable to client/server computing. The various interacting categories of client/server computing as well as the benefits and implications of such a system will be fully explored.

MIS 320 - TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION

This course will prepare students for the bi-directional technical communication demands specific to computer and information systems. Topics include technical research methods and approaches, critical analysis of technical documents, synthesis of data, information and knowledge gained through research and critical analysis, creation of accurate technical documents, and effective delivery of technical material via oral presentations supported by visual media.

MIS 360 - ENTERPRISE-WIDE ELECTRONIC COMMERCE

This course is designed to familiarize individuals with current and emerging business processes that utilize electronic data transmission technologies including the Internet. Topics will include network and Internet technology for business advantage, enterprise-wide business functions and processes, re-engineering of legacy processes through electronic commerce, and Internet-based business-to-consumer business ventures. Social, political and ethical issues associated with electronic commerce are reviewed. The purpose of this course is to educate a new generation of managers, planners and analysts of the realities and potential for electronic commerce.

MIS 400 - SYSTEM ANALYSIS & DESIGN

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC), tools and methods. The course is centered on evaluating existing business processes and choosing a system development methodology to improve upon it. Emphasis will be on analyzing, modeling and designing processes that improve business processes through the deployment of information technology. It will also emphasize the factors for effective communication and integration with users and user systems. It encourages interpersonal skill development with clients, end-users, team members and others associated with development, operation and maintenance of systems.

The above list of courses only represents a portion of the courses required for a bachelor's degree. View the bachelor's degree full curriculum.

Additional Course Descriptions

Professional Core

Take a detailed look at courses that build upon your general education knowledge, and help to prepare you for major area coursework.

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