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Information Systems Auditing Degree Program

Information Systems Audit Degree - Information Systems Auditing Program Program OverviewProgram DetailsWhy Choose Franklin
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Information Systems Auditing - Subsequent Bachelor of Science Degree

Looking to earn an additional bachelor’s degree? This degree is specifically designed for students who have already completed a bachelor's degree or higher.

Prerequisite Competencies

  • COMP 106 - INTRODUCTION TO SPREADSHEETS (1)

    COMP 106

    INTRODUCTION TO SPREADSHEETS

    Course Description

    This course focuses on using spreadsheets to solve business applications.
  • HUMN 211 - INTRO TO ETHICAL ANALYSIS AND REASONING (2)

    HUMN 211

    INTRO TO ETHICAL ANALYSIS AND REASONING

    Course Description

    The goal of this course is to help you improve your ethical analysis and reasoning skills. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing ethical arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. In this course, you will discover how to apply the following questions to your job and everyday life. Why do we need ethics if we have laws to govern our behavior? Does the majority view determine what is ethical and what is not? Are feelings, desires, and preferences reliable ethical guides? Is it ever appropriate to criticize another individual's (or culture's) ethical judgment? Are people always responsible for their actions? Do human beings have a natural tendency to good, a natural tendency to evil? both? neither? Is there a single moral code that is binding on all people, at all times, and in all places?
  • MATH 160 - COLLEGE ALGEBRA (4)

    MATH 160

    COLLEGE ALGEBRA

    Course Description

    This course is designed to prepare students for Applied Calculus and Discrete Mathematics and to provide the mathematical background needed for the analytic reasoning used in other courses. Topics include functions and their graphs, including exponential and logarithmic functions; complex numbers; systems of equations and inequalities; matrices; basic principles of counting and probability; and other selected topics.
  • MATH 215 - STATISTICAL CONCEPTS (4)

    MATH 215

    STATISTICAL CONCEPTS

    Course Description

    This course introduces the student to statistics with business applications. The course covers both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics included are: measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion; graphical displays of data; linear regression; basic probability concepts; binomial and normal probability distributions; confidence intervals; and hypothesis testing. These topics will be covered using a basic knowledge of algebra and Microsoft Excel.
  • PF 321 - LEARNING STRATEGIES (2)

    PF 321

    LEARNING STRATEGIES

    Course Description

    This course prepares students to be successful lifelong learners both academically and in their chosen careers. Franklin courses require a high level of self-directed learning and focus on skills required in the workplace and the classroom that are easily transferable between the two environments. The course includes strategies for advancing communication skills, including the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments. The assignments and activities in the course are created to closely simulate teamwork found in the workplace.
  • WRIT 320 - BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WRITING (4)

    WRIT 320

    BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WRITING

    Course Description

    This is an advanced composition course for juniors and seniors which focuses on business, technical and professional writing. Skills taught include audience analysis; research methods; questionnaire, interview and survey techniques; letters; data collection, interpretation and documentation; graphic illustration; and composition of reports in special formats. Instruction and practice are provided in writing various types of reports such as r‚sum‚s, proposals, summaries, research reports and instructions for user manuals, and in presenting committee and oral reports. Students will be encouraged to relate course materials to their major programs and their workplaces.

Professional Core (28 hours)

  • ACCT 215 - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (4)

    ACCT 215

    FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

    Course Description

    An introduction to accounting emphasizing how general purpose financial statements communicate information about the business corporation?s performance and position for users external to management. Approximately one third of the course emphasizes how the accountant processes and presents the information and includes exposure to recording transactions, adjusting balances and preparing financial statements for service and merchandise firms according to established rules and procedures. The balance of the course examines major elements of the statements such as cash, receivables, inventory, long?lived assets, depreciation, payroll, bonds, and other liabilities and stocks. Concepts of this course are applied to Managerial Accounting (ACCT 225). Students are advised to avoid any time lapse between these courses.
  • ACCT 225 - MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (4)

    ACCT 225

    MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING

    Course Description

    The study of management accounting for internal reporting and decision-making. The course introduces a business-management approach to the development and use of accounting information. Major topics include cost behavior, cost analysis, profit planning and control measures. Accounting for decentralized operations, capital budgeting decisions, and ethical challenges in managerial accounting are also covered.
  • MGMT 312 - PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (4)

    MGMT 312

    PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT

    Course Description

    This course explores the basic concepts and processes of management. Students will explore the functional roles and processes of planning, leading, organizing, and controlling comprising the manager role. Students develop skills related to the manager function and required in today's competitive environment.
  • COMP 101 - PROBLEM SOLVING WITH COMPUTING (2)

    COMP 101

    PROBLEM SOLVING WITH COMPUTING

    Course Description

    Many organizations today utilize computers and information systems to store, organize, analyze, and summarize data to solve problems. As a result, computing is a tool that can benefit students in many different fields. At the heart of solving problems with computers is the study of structured thinking using algorithms. This course is designed for students with no prior programming experience and teaches the building blocks of algorithms, including variables, expressions, selection and repetition structures, functions and parameters, and array processing.
  • COMP 281 - DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (4)

    COMP 281

    DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    Course Description

    This course covers fundamental concepts necessary for the design, use, implementation and administration of database systems. The course will stress the fundamentals of database modeling and design, the languages and facilities provided by database management systems, and some techniques for implementing and administering database systems.
  • ITEC 136 - PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING (4)

    ITEC 136

    PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING

    Course Description

    This course covers fundamental programming principles for individuals with at least some programming background. Major themes are structured programming, problem solving, algorithm design, top-down stepwise refinement, and software lifecycle. Topics will include testing, data types, operators, repetition and selection control structures, functions, arrays, and objects. Students will design, code, test, debug, and document programs in a relevant programming language.
  • HRM 300 - HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (4)

    HRM 300

    HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT

    Course Description

    An introduction to the human resources function and related elements and activities. The course outlines the roles and functions of members of the human resources department, as well as educating others outside human resources, in how their roles include human resources-related activities. The student will learn about the evolution in human resources management as we know it today. Emphasis is placed on the modern day importance of HRM and the new "corporate view" of the function. Additionally, the student will be exposed to the view of HRM from the perception of both management and subordinate employees. The importance of maintaining fair and equitable compensation and benefit programs will be discussed. The student will be exposed to practical situations and problem solving regarding areas of employee counseling, discipline and termination. Equal Employment Opportunity will be discussed in order for the student to understand its need, importance and the legal issues surrounding it. Other critical areas of training and development, staffing and strategy will also be explored.
  • WEBD 101 - INTRODUCTION TO WEB PAGE CONSTRUCTION (2)

    WEBD 101

    INTRODUCTION TO WEB PAGE CONSTRUCTION

    Course Description

    This course covers the fundamental concepts necessary for the construction of web pages using the basic building blocks of Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (css). HTML and XHTML are covered in detail for building web pages using a web page development environment. The use of styling using css is introduced.

Major Area (40 hours)

  • ACCT 310 - INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I (4)

    ACCT 310

    INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I

    Course Description

    The first of two in-depth financial accounting courses. Theory, the conceptual framework, development of generally accepted accounting principles, and applications are stressed. Topics include the income statement, the statement of cash flows and the balance sheet, specifically asset accounts.
  • ACCT 320 - INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II (4)

    ACCT 320

    INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II

    Course Description

    The second of two in-depth financial accounting courses. Theory, concepts and applications are stressed. Topics include time value of money, current and non-current liabilities, leases, deferred taxes, retirement benefits, stockholders? equity, earning per share, accounting changes and errors, and statement of cash flows.
  • ACCT 425 - ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS (4)

    ACCT 425

    ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    Course Description

    This course creates a framework for accounting information systems by combining knowledge about business as it relates to information systems, information technology, and accounting. Students will examine the REA enterprise ontology as it relates to databases which can be used to store and retrieve information for decision-making within an organization. Students learn that in the competitive organizations of today, and tomorrow, accountants cannot simply prepare and report information; they must take a more active role in understanding and creating systems and processes that impact the organization?s bottom line.
  • ACCT 470 - AUDITING (4)

    ACCT 470

    AUDITING

    Course Description

    A study of the planning, evidence gathering, internal control review, sampling, and application of procedures used to audit assets, liabilities, equity and related income statement accounts of a profit-oriented enterprise. Includes an evaluation of the audit profession including professional standards, ethics and liability of CPAs. Also includes a student-prepared audit case for hands-on application of audit procedures. The reporting requirements for compilation and review services and a thorough study of the types of audit opinions will also be studied. In addition, an audit research paper is required.
  • ISEC 300 - PRINCIPLES OF INFORMATION SECURITY (4)

    ISEC 300

    PRINCIPLES OF INFORMATION SECURITY

    Course Description

    In a highly connected, data intensive, and cost-focused business environment, the practice of information security not a business advantage; it is a customer requirement. Viruses, malware, trojans, denial of service attacks, phishing, and even Wiki leaks have become headline news. Failure to insure the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of data costs companies millions, if not billions of dollars in legal settlements, lost business, and trade secrets. In this breadth-based course, you will get an overview of information security principles and practices, including security models, risk management, access controls, intrusion detection and prevention, cryptography, software vulnerabilities, and ethical issues. Subsequent courses expand on this foundational material in much greater depth.
  • MIS 310 - INFORMATION SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE &yTECHNOLOGY (4)

    MIS 310

    INFORMATION SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE &yTECHNOLOGY

    Course Description

    This course provides a conceptual survey of general systems theory followed by a conceptual and technological survey of the structure of distributed information systems architectures, operating systems, network operating systems, peripheral technology and user interfaces. Interoperability between these architectural components will be explored and current technology and trends in each architectural element will be reviewed. This course will de-emphasize, although not ignore, mainframe architectures in favor of information architectures more applicable to client/server computing. The various interacting categories of client/server computing as well as the benefits and implications of such a system will be fully explored.
  • MIS 320 - TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION (4)

    MIS 320

    TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION

    Course Description

    This course will prepare students for the bi-directional technical communication demands specific to computer and information systems. Topics include technical research methods and approaches, critical analysis of technical documents, synthesis of data, information and knowledge gained through research and critical analysis, creation of accurate technical documents, and effective delivery of technical material via oral presentations supported by visual media.
  • MIS 360 - ENTERPRISE-WIDE ELECTRONIC COMMERCE (4)

    MIS 360

    ENTERPRISE-WIDE ELECTRONIC COMMERCE

    Course Description

    This course is designed to familiarize individuals with current and emerging business processes that utilize electronic data transmission technologies including the Internet. Topics will include network and Internet technology for business advantage, enterprise-wide business functions and processes, re-engineering of legacy processes through electronic commerce, and Internet-based business-to-consumer business ventures. Social, political and ethical issues associated with electronic commerce are reviewed. The purpose of this course is to educate a new generation of managers, planners and analysts of the realities and potential for electronic commerce.
  • MIS 400 - SYSTEM ANALYSIS & DESIGN (4)

    MIS 400

    SYSTEM ANALYSIS & DESIGN

    Course Description

    This course is designed to provide an understanding of the Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC), tools and methods. The course is centered on evaluating existing business processes and choosing a system development methodology to improve upon it. Emphasis will be on analyzing, modeling and designing processes that improve business processes through the deployment of information technology. It will also emphasize the factors for effective communication and integration with users and user systems. It encourages interpersonal skill development with clients, end-users, team members and others associated with development, operation and maintenance of systems.
  • ISA 495 - INFORMATION SYSTEMS AUDIT AND CONTROL (4)

    ISA 495

    INFORMATION SYSTEMS AUDIT AND CONTROL

    Course Description

    This course will culminate the Bachelor of Science in Information Systems Auditing program by drawing from and synthesizing concepts from both the MIS and Accounting fields in order to address issues related specifically to the audit of information systems and technology.

Additional Requirements

Each candidate for a subsequent degree must successfully complete in residence at Franklin University a minimum of 30 credit hours of 200 level courses or above, of which a minimum of 16 credit hours must be in major area courses at the 300 or 400 level. If the student is a previous Franklin bachelor of science degree graduate, the 30 credits must be earned after the first Franklin B.S. degree was awarded. If the required courses for a subsequent degree total less than 30 credit hours, the student may take Free Elective courses to achieve residency. Either PF 121 or PF 321 must be taken prior to the first BLF course, or it may be taken concurrently with the first 15-week BLF course. Students also must meet the University algebra competency requirement

A minimum GPA of 2.25 is required in the major area, and each major area course must be completed with a grade of “C” or better to count toward degree requirements.

Please see the Academic Bulletin for the complete list of degree and residency requirements.

Additional Curriculum

Information Systems Auditing - Bachelor of Science Degree

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