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B.S. Information Technology Degree Program

Information Technology Degree - IT College & Online IT Degrees Program OverviewProgram DetailsWhy Choose Franklin
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Information Technology - Associate of Science Degree

64 Semester Hours

Fundamental General Education Core (24 hours)

English Composition

Choose a minimum of 3 semester hours from:

  • WRIT 120 - COLLEGE WRITING (4)

    WRIT 120

    COLLEGE WRITING

    Course Description

    In this course, students acquire the writing competence necessary for conducting and presenting research. A variety of assignments, beginning with personal reflections, build upon one another, as students develop ideas that respond to, critique, and synthesize the positions of others. Students systematize and organize knowledge in ways that will help them in all of their courses. The course also emphasizes the elements of good writing style, appropriate grammar and mechanics, clarity of language, and logical and cohesive development. It culminates in submission of a documented research paper.
Mathematics

Choose a minimum of three semester hours from:

  • MATH 160 - COLLEGE ALGEBRA (4)

    MATH 160

    COLLEGE ALGEBRA

    Course Description

    This course is designed to prepare students for Applied Calculus and Discrete Mathematics and to provide the mathematical background needed for the analytic reasoning used in other courses. Topics include functions and their graphs, including exponential and logarithmic functions; complex numbers; systems of equations and inequalities; matrices; basic principles of counting and probability; and other selected topics.
    1
1 Choose MATH 150 Fundamental Algebra as the prerequisite. Course can count as a general education or University elective.
Sciences

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

  • SCIE 210 - UNDERSTANDING SCIENCE: PRINCIPLES, PRACTICE, & THEORY (2)

    SCIE 210

    UNDERSTANDING SCIENCE: PRINCIPLES, PRACTICE, & THEORY

    Course Description

    Understanding Science: Principles, Practice & Theory is a two credit hour course that introduces students to the major themes, processes, and methods common to all scientific disciplines. Students will develop critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate all kinds of phenomena, scientific, pseudoscientific, and other. The focus is on the nature of science so students will develop an understanding of how science works and develop an appreciation for the process by which we gain scientific knowledge.
  • SCIE 211 - INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC ANALYSIS & REASONING (4)

    SCIE 211

    INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC ANALYSIS & REASONING

    Course Description

    Introduction to Scientific Analysis and Reasoning is a four credit hour course consisting of three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of laboratory. This course is an introduction to critical thinking on statistical and scientific claims. The student will develop the critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate popular sources of (mis)information and to better understand and evaluate all sorts of scientific claims and arguments. The focus of the course is on students developing thoughtful and critical use of scientific information and research to be able to separate truth from deception and make decisions that affect their personal lives and roles as informed and engaged citizens.
Social and Behavioral Sciences

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

  • Coursework from the Anthropology, Economics, Psychology, or Sociology disciplines, or PUAD 295 American Government in Action.
Arts and Humanities

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

  • HUMN 210 - INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC & CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS (2)

    HUMN 210

    INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC & CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS

    Course Description

    The goal of this course is to help you improve as a critical, logical thinker. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. You will discover how to apply these valuable skills to your studies and everyday life, learning how to overcome obstacles to critical thinking, and how to avoid being deceived by means of misleading reasoning.
  • HUMN 211 - INTRO TO ETHICAL ANALYSIS AND REASONING (2)

    HUMN 211

    INTRO TO ETHICAL ANALYSIS AND REASONING

    Course Description

    The goal of this course is to help you improve your ethical analysis and reasoning skills. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing ethical arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. In this course, you will discover how to apply the following questions to your job and everyday life. Why do we need ethics if we have laws to govern our behavior' Does the majority view determine what is ethical and what is not' Are feelings, desires, and preferences reliable ethical guides' Is it ever appropriate to criticize another individual's (or culture's) ethical judgment' Are people always responsible for their actions' Do human beings have a natural tendency to good, a natural tendency to evil' both' neither' Is there a single moral code that is binding on all people, at all times, and in all places'
  • HUMN 218 - WORLD RELIGIONS (4)

    HUMN 218

    WORLD RELIGIONS

    Course Description

    A comparative study of the founders, sacred writings, beliefs and practices of some of the major world religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Islam, Judaism and Christianity. This course enables the student to study and compare the leading religions of the world in light of their historical and cultural backgrounds. Students will be encouraged to explore faith traditions other than their own. Common themes across religions, spiritual practice, and current related cultural and political issues will also be considered.
  • HUMN 232 - INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE (4)

    HUMN 232

    INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE

    Course Description

    In this course, students will analyze works from the three major literary genres: poetry, drama, and fiction. Students will become familiar with standard vocabulary and approaches specific to the field of literary criticism and consider the importance of literature in contemporary society. The goal of this course is to encourage students to read for pleasure (engage with the text on an emotional level) while also moving towards a more objective consideration of literature by introducing the fundamentals of close reading and literary analysis.
  • HUMN 240 - POPULAR CULTURE (4)

    HUMN 240

    POPULAR CULTURE

    Course Description

    An introductory course that examines basic concepts in popular culture studies and the role popular arts and artifacts play in shaping cultural values. The course covers basic theories and approaches to topics like best sellers, popular music, popular art forms, cultural heroes from the sports and entertainment worlds and other popular phenomena.
  • HUMN 246 - FILM APPRECIATION (4)

    HUMN 246

    FILM APPRECIATION

    Course Description

    This course is an introduction to the art of film intended to enable students to become more knowledgeable, appreciative and critical viewers. The course covers the major areas of film: narrative, documentary, animated and experimental. While some film history is covered, this course emphasizes understanding key elements in the filmmaking process: scripting, filming, editing, acting, directing, promoting and distributing. Students will be required to view and write critical reviews of films screened both in and out of class.
Learn More About General Education

Additional General Education Requirements (16 hours)

  • PF 321 - LEARNING STRATEGIES (2)

    PF 321

    LEARNING STRATEGIES

    Course Description

    This course prepares students to be successful lifelong learners both academically and in their chosen careers. Franklin courses require a high level of self-directed learning and focus on skills required in the workplace and the classroom that are easily transferable between the two environments. The course includes strategies for advancing communication skills, including the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments. The assignments and activities in the course are created to closely simulate teamwork found in the workplace.
  • SPCH 100 - SPEECH COMMUNICATION (4)

    SPCH 100

    SPEECH COMMUNICATION

    Course Description

    A basic public speaking course intended to improve the student's ability to think critically and to communicate orally. Theory and practice are provided in various speaking situations. Each student is required to speak before an audience, but class work also involves reading, gathering and organizing information, writing and listening.

    OR COMM 150 - INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION (4)

    COMM 150

    INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION

    Course Description

    By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking.
  • General Education Elective (6)

University Electives (4 hours)

  • Any undergraduate courses offered by the University except developmental education courses.

Major Area (24 hours)

  • COMM 305 - VIRTUAL COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES (2)

    COMM 305

    VIRTUAL COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES

    Course Description

    This course covers the conceptual and technological components of building and managing collaborative communication environments. Analysis and application of theories to new collaborative technologies will be explored.
  • COMP 101 - PROBLEM SOLVING WITH COMPUTING (2)

    COMP 101

    PROBLEM SOLVING WITH COMPUTING

    Course Description

    Many organizations today utilize computers and information systems to store, organize, analyze, and summarize data to solve problems. As a result, computing is a tool that can benefit students in many different fields. At the heart of solving problems with computers is the study of structured thinking using algorithms. This course is designed for students with no prior programming experience and teaches the building blocks of algorithms, including variables, expressions, selection and repetition structures, functions and parameters, and array processing.
  • COMP 204 - PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER NETWORKS (2)

    COMP 204

    PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER NETWORKS

    Course Description

    This course serves as an introduction to the function, design, administration, and implementation of computer networks. Topics include network infrastructure, architecture, protocols, applications, and the OSI networking model.
  • COMP 281 - DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (4)

    COMP 281

    DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    Course Description

    This course covers fundamental concepts necessary for the design, use, implementation and administration of database systems. The course will stress the fundamentals of database modeling and design, the languages and facilities provided by database management systems, and some techniques for implementing and administering database systems.
  • ITEC 136 - PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING (4)

    ITEC 136

    PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING

    Course Description

    This course covers fundamental programming principles for individuals with at least some programming background. Major themes are structured programming, problem solving, algorithm design, top-down stepwise refinement, and software lifecycle. Topics will include testing, data types, operators, repetition and selection control structures, functions, arrays, and objects. Students will design, code, test, debug, and document programs in a relevant programming language.
  • ITEC 275 - COMPUTER NETWORKS: SWITCHING, ROUTING, & WANS (4)

    ITEC 275

    COMPUTER NETWORKS: SWITCHING, ROUTING, & WANS

    Course Description

    This course covers both the design and basic configuration of computer networks. Using Cisco Systems CCDA© certification as a guide, students will learn about the OSI model, network topologies, Wide Area Network (WAN) technologies, wireless LAN, IP addressing, routing protocols, and network security mechanisms. This course also utilizes simulation software to create a small virtual network on the student's personal computer running Windows XP or Vista. This provides the student interactive configuration experience with the Cisco Systems Internetworking Operating System (IOS) in an isolated environment.
  • MIS 200 - MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (4)

    MIS 200

    MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    Course Description

    The purpose of this course is to provide the fundamentals associated with the management of information technology in a business enterprise. These fundamentals are business concepts in which the influence of information technology has caused change or brought about new concepts. Special emphasis will be placed on understanding the managerial issues that are relevant to usage of computers. The student will be given problems isolating these issues and will be asked to propose solutions with alternatives.
  • WEBD 101 - INTRODUCTION TO WEB PAGE CONSTRUCTION (2)

    WEBD 101

    INTRODUCTION TO WEB PAGE CONSTRUCTION

    Course Description

    This course covers the fundamental concepts necessary for the construction of web pages using the basic building blocks of Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (css). HTML and XHTML are covered in detail for building web pages using a web page development environment. The use of styling using css is introduced.

Additional Requirements

  • All students are required to pass College Writing (WRIT 120), either Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121) or Learning Strategies (PF 321) and either Speech Communication (SPCH 100) or Interpersonal Communication (COMM 150) prior to enrolling in any other course at the 200 level or above. Either PF 121 or PF 321 must be taken prior to the first BLF course, or it may be taken concurrently with the first 15-week BLF course. Students who enroll at Franklin with 30 or fewer hours of transfer credit are required to pass Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121) in place of Learning Strategies (PF 321). Students must also meet the University algebra competency requirement.

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Please see the Academic Bulletin for the complete list of degree and residency requirements.

Additional Curriculum

Information Technology - Bachelor of Science Degree

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Build well-rounded skills and learn the industry specific knowledge you will need to be successful in your career.

Information Technology - Subsequent Bachelor of Science Degree

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Looking to earn an additional bachelor’s degree? A subsequent degree is specifically designed for students who have already completed a bachelor's degree or higher.

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