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Information Technology Bachelor's Degree Program

Information Technology Degree - IT College & Online IT Degrees Program OverviewProgram DetailsWhy Choose Franklin
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Information Technology - Subsequent Bachelor of Science Degree

Looking to earn an additional bachelor’s degree? This degree is specifically designed for students who have already completed a bachelor's degree or higher.

Prerequisite Competencies

  • HUMN 211 - INTRO TO ETHICAL ANALYSIS AND REASONING (2)

    HUMN 211

    INTRO TO ETHICAL ANALYSIS AND REASONING

    Course Description

    The goal of this course is to help you improve your ethical analysis and reasoning skills. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing ethical arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. In this course, you will discover how to apply the following questions to your job and everyday life. Why do we need ethics if we have laws to govern our behavior' Does the majority view determine what is ethical and what is not' Are feelings, desires, and preferences reliable ethical guides' Is it ever appropriate to criticize another individual's (or culture's) ethical judgment' Are people always responsible for their actions' Do human beings have a natural tendency to good, a natural tendency to evil' both' neither' Is there a single moral code that is binding on all people, at all times, and in all places'
  • MATH 160 - COLLEGE ALGEBRA (4)

    MATH 160

    COLLEGE ALGEBRA

    Course Description

    This course is designed to prepare students for Applied Calculus and Discrete Mathematics and to provide the mathematical background needed for the analytic reasoning used in other courses. Topics include functions and their graphs, including exponential and logarithmic functions; complex numbers; systems of equations and inequalities; matrices; basic principles of counting and probability; and other selected topics.
  • MATH 280 - Introduction to Probability & STATISTICS (4)

    MATH 280

    Introduction to Probability & STATISTICS

    Course Description

    This course is designed to serve students in the Computer and Information Sciences majors. The topics covered are descriptive statistics in numerical & graphical methods, probability concepts, discrete and continuous probability distributions, estimation theory, hypothesis testing, simple linear regression and correlation, and linear programming. These topics will be taught with a rigorous Algebra content and using a statistical software such as Minitab.
  • PF 321 - LEARNING STRATEGIES (2)

    PF 321

    LEARNING STRATEGIES

    Course Description

    This course prepares students to be successful lifelong learners both academically and in their chosen careers. Franklin courses require a high level of self-directed learning and focus on skills required in the workplace and the classroom that are easily transferable between the two environments. The course includes strategies for advancing communication skills, including the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments. The assignments and activities in the course are created to closely simulate teamwork found in the workplace.
  • WRIT 220 - RESEARCH WRITING: EXPLORING PROFESSIONAL IDENTITIES (4)

    WRIT 220

    RESEARCH WRITING: EXPLORING PROFESSIONAL IDENTITIES

    Course Description

    This is an intermediate course focusing on the composition of research papers. Students in this course prepare to be active participants in professional discourse communities by examining and practicing the writing conventions associated with their own fields of study and work. By calling attention to the conventions of disciplinary writing, the course also prepares students for upper-division college writing and the special conventions of advanced academic discourse. Course activities include three extended research papers, semi-formal writing addressing interdisciplinary communication, and readings fostering critical engagement with disciplinary conversations.

Technical Credit (24 hours)

  • Programming Fundamentals Course (4)
  • Database Fundamentals Course (4)
  • Network Fundamentals Course (2)
  • Cybersecurity Fundamentals Course (2)

Students must have 12 hours of coursework in information technology. Courses can be selected from the following technology related areas:

  • Computer Graphics
  • Operating Systems
  • Networks
  • Web Design & Implementation
  • Multimedia Technologies
  • Programming
  • Other IT related area with approval from the Program Chair

Major Area (28 hours)

  • ISEC 300 - INFORMATION ASSURANCE (4)

    ISEC 300

    INFORMATION ASSURANCE

    Course Description

    In a highly connected, data intensive, and cost-focused business environment, the practice of information security not a business advantage; it is a customer requirement. Viruses, malware, trojans, denial of service attacks, phishing, and even Wiki leaks have become headline news. Failure to insure the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of data costs companies millions, if not billions of dollars in legal settlements, lost business, and trade secrets. In this breadth-based course, you will get an overview of information security principles and practices, including security models, risk management, access controls, intrusion detection and prevention, cryptography, software vulnerabilities, and ethical issues. Subsequent courses expand on this foundational material in much greater depth. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
  • ITEC 275 - COMPUTER NETWORKS: SWITCHING, ROUTING, & WANS (4)

    ITEC 275

    COMPUTER NETWORKS: SWITCHING, ROUTING, & WANS

    Course Description

    This course covers both the design and basic configuration of computer networks. Using Cisco Systems CCDA© certification as a guide, students will learn about the OSI model, network topologies, Wide Area Network (WAN) technologies, wireless LAN, IP addressing, routing protocols, and network security mechanisms. This course also utilizes simulation software to create a small virtual network on the student's personal computer running Windows XP or Vista. This provides the student interactive configuration experience with the Cisco Systems Internetworking Operating System (IOS) in an isolated environment. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
  • ITEC 400 - LINUX ADMINISTRATION (4)

    ITEC 400

    LINUX ADMINISTRATION

    Course Description

    This course covers the basic methods of Linux system administration. The course will focus not only on user-level commands and utilities, but also upon installation and configuration of the kernel, file system, memory, peripheral devices, authentication/authorization and network facilities. The course also provides an introduction to the Perl programming language and the role of Linux in the enterprise. This course also uses virtualization software to isolate the Linux operating system from the underlying host operating system. As such, administrative access to a late-model computer with sufficient memory and hard drive space is required. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
  • ITEC 430 - INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY PROJECT MANAGEMENT (4)

    ITEC 430

    INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY PROJECT MANAGEMENT

    Course Description

    This course provides an introduction to the concepts of information technology project management and techniques for initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling of resources to accomplish specific project goals. Both technical and behavioral aspects of project management are discussed. While the focus is on information technology projects, the principles follow the nine project management knowledge areas outlined in the Project Management Institute's PMBOK® Guide Third Edition and thus are applicable to the management of any project. Topics will include integration, scope, time, cost, quality, human resource, communications, risk, and procurement management. Project management software utilization is emphasized. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
  • ITEC 475 - VIRTUALIZATION & CLOUD COMPUTING (4)

    ITEC 475

    VIRTUALIZATION & CLOUD COMPUTING

    Course Description

    Today's organizations have come to depend on storing data and provisioning services through virtual cloud infrastructures. This course provides a broad coverage of virtualization and cloud infrastructure technologies, how this contrasts with physical data centers and the ways that organizations transition between these environments. Students plan, design, and provision cloud-based virtual desktops, documents, applications and services across multiple platforms.
  • ITEC 495 - INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY CAPSTONE (4)

    ITEC 495

    INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY CAPSTONE

    Course Description

    The Information Technology capstone course encourages teamwork in small groups on a substantial project. The intent of this course is to provide a capstone experience that integrates the material contained in required courses of the ITEC major. It also provides an opportunity for students to recognize and evaluate the interrelationship of their general education courses with the courses taken for their major. The capstone will include discussion about professional and ethical issues related to Information Technology. Students will also culminate their experiences with an overview of the evolution of computer systems and a look at the near-term future.
  • MIS 310 - INFORMATION SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE & TECHNOLOGY (4)

    MIS 310

    INFORMATION SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE & TECHNOLOGY

    Course Description

    This course provides a conceptual survey of general systems theory followed by a conceptual and technological survey of the structure of distributed information systems architectures, operating systems, network operating systems, peripheral technology and user interfaces. Interoperability between these architectural components will be explored and current technology and trends in each architectural element will be reviewed. This course will de-emphasize, although not ignore, mainframe architectures in favor of information architectures more applicable to client/server computing. The various interacting categories of client/server computing as well as the benefits and implications of such a system will be fully explored.

Major Electives (8 hours)

Select 8 hours from the following:

  • INFA 300 - INTRODUCTION TO ANALYTICS (4)

    INFA 300

    INTRODUCTION TO ANALYTICS

    Course Description

    This course leads students through the foundational concepts, methods and concerns related to the practice of information / data analysis from the posing of questions needing answers to gathering the data, generating statistics, analyzing the results, formulating answers to the questions, and reporting those answers. Course topics include defining clear, accurate and actionable research questions and the answers, selecting data and methods; generating relevant statistics and reporting the story the data tells regarding the questions and the sought-after answers using basic tools such as those intrinsic to spreadsheet software such as Microsoft Excel.
  • ISEC 325 - NETWORK SECURITY (4)

    ISEC 325

    NETWORK SECURITY

    Course Description

    Networks are the major point of entry to most computer systems. Preventing unwanted intrusion, use, abuse, or flooding of communications channels is a high priority to organizations trying to protect their assets. Network security is about preserving the appropriate use of network resources while preventing disallowed use. In this course, you will learn how to employ firewalls, VPNs, and stateful packet inspection techniques to harden computer networks. Topics include packet filtering, intrusion detection and prevention, ingress and egress rules, monitoring, network access controls, authentication, authorization, and auditing. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
  • ISEC 350 - SECURITY RISK MANAGEMENT (4)

    ISEC 350

    SECURITY RISK MANAGEMENT

    Course Description

    Proper assessment, management, and mitigation of risk are essential to any information security strategy. Risks aren't just related to IT assets, but to the overall business that the IT organization is supporting, thus, business continuity planning and impact analysis is also important. In this course, you will learn how to identify and analyze risks, determine impacts, and develop plans to mitigate issues. Topics include threats, vulnerabilities, exploits, and countermeasures; US compliance laws; risk assessment and mitigation; business impact analysis; and business continuity and disaster recovery planning.
  • ISPM 450 - ADVANCED PROJECT MANAGEMENT (4)

    ISPM 450

    ADVANCED PROJECT MANAGEMENT

    Course Description

    This course focuses on knowledge, understanding and skills related to building competencies in overseeing the architecture, design, and implementation of software systems. Specific topics include agile software development practices, planning and governance of large projects, identification, assessment and management of current and emerging information technologies, and the application of project management tools for software architecture, project communications, risk analysis, cost estimation and budgeting, and quality control in managing the software development life cycle.
  • ITEC 325 - DATA CENTER DESIGN & ADMINISTRATION (4)

    ITEC 325

    DATA CENTER DESIGN & ADMINISTRATION

    Course Description

    Data centers house the most critical enterprise computing infrastructure components. A well designed and managed data center is crucial for high availability and business continuity. This course is designed to cover data center design and management principles, including facilities setup, power and cooling, disaster recovery, servers, storage, VOIP, network operations, and virtualization. Attention is paid to the best practices of data center operations, including organization, documentation, standardization, and consolidation.
  • ITEC 350 - WINDOWS ADMINISTRATION (4)

    ITEC 350

    WINDOWS ADMINISTRATION

    Course Description

    This course provides the student with an introduction to Windows Server 2008 administration and is structured to assist a network manager or planner in planning, configuring, installing, running, and repairing networks that include a Windows Server 2008. As such, it provides an introduction to server installation, Active Directory, printer management, domains, network clients, security, disaster recovery, fault/error management, and scripting of common tasks. This course also uses virtualization software to isolate the Windows Server 2008 operating system from the underlying host operating system. As such, administrative access to a fast machine running Windows XP or better with at least 2 gigabytes of memory and 40 gigabytes of available hard drive space is required. For face to face classes, an external USB 2.0 hard drive with at least 40 gigabytes of free space is required to bring to class.
  • ITEC 450 - DATABASE ADMINISTRATION (4)

    ITEC 450

    DATABASE ADMINISTRATION

    Course Description

    This course covers a breadth of subjects in Database Administration. Building on the database management systems course, this course covers topics about the configuration, administration and performance of the database engine itself. Using Oracle 10g as a platform, students will learn about installation, configuration, performance tuning, security, disaster planning and recovery, and network connectivity of databases. This course also uses virtualization software to isolate the database server operating system from the underlying host operating system. As such, administrative access to a fast machine with at least 1 gigabyte of memory and 20 gigabytes of available hard drive space is required.

Additional Requirements

Each candidate for a subsequent degree must successfully complete in residence at Franklin University a minimum of 30 credit hours of 200 level courses or above, of which a minimum of 16 credit hours must be in major area courses at the 300 or 400 level. If the student is a previous Franklin bachelor of science degree graduate, the 30 credits must be earned after the first Franklin B.S. degree was awarded. If the required courses for a subsequent degree total less than 30 credit hours, the student may take Free Elective courses to achieve residency. Either PF 121 or PF 321 must be taken prior to the first BLF course, or it may be taken concurrently with the first 15-week BLF course. Students also must meet the University algebra competency requirement

A minimum GPA of 2.25 is required in the major area, and each major area course must be completed with a grade of “C” or better to count toward degree requirements.

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Please see the Academic Bulletin for the complete list of degree and residency requirements.

Additional Curriculum

Information Technology - Bachelor of Science Degree

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Build well-rounded skills and learn the industry specific knowledge you will need to be successful in your career.

Information Technology - Associate of Science Degree

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Begin building your educational foundation with a curriculum that has a broad base in general education while touching upon a specific area of study.

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