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Management Information Sciences Degree Program

Management Information Systems Degree - MIS Degree Program Online Program OverviewProgram DetailsWhy Choose Franklin
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Major Area Course Descriptions

COMP 281 - DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

This course covers fundamental concepts necessary for the design, use, implementation and administration of database systems. The course will stress the fundamentals of database modeling and design, the languages and facilities provided by database management systems, and some techniques for implementing and administering database systems.

MIS 310 - INFORMATION SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE & TECHNOLOGY

This course provides a conceptual survey of general systems theory followed by a conceptual and technological survey of the structure of distributed information systems architectures, operating systems, network operating systems, peripheral technology and user interfaces. Interoperability between these architectural components will be explored and current technology and trends in each architectural element will be reviewed. This course will de-emphasize, although not ignore, mainframe architectures in favor of information architectures more applicable to client/server computing. The various interacting categories of client/server computing as well as the benefits and implications of such a system will be fully explored.

MIS 320 - TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION

This course will prepare students for the bi-directional technical communication demands specific to computer and information systems. Topics include technical research methods and approaches, critical analysis of technical documents, synthesis of data, information and knowledge gained through research and critical analysis, creation of accurate technical documents, and effective delivery of technical material via oral presentations supported by visual media.

MIS 330 - SYSTEMS INTEGRATION CONCEPTS & PRACTICES

Systems integration permeates the information management landscape, operating conceptually on three levels: the strategy of achieving enterprise-level information systems (IS) integration, the process at the IS department-level to achieve integration and the selection of technologies needed to achieve integration. This course examines these levels of systems integration, emphasizing realistic solutions, guidelines, and practices, through a hands-on approach.

MIS 360 - ENTERPRISE-WIDE ELECTRONIC COMMERCE

This course is designed to familiarize individuals with current and emerging business processes that utilize electronic data transmission technologies including the Internet. Topics will include network and Internet technology for business advantage, enterprise-wide business functions and processes, re-engineering of legacy processes through electronic commerce, and Internet-based business-to-consumer business ventures. Social, political and ethical issues associated with electronic commerce are reviewed. The purpose of this course is to educate a new generation of managers, planners and analysts of the realities and potential for electronic commerce.

MIS 400 - SYSTEM ANALYSIS & DESIGN

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC), tools and methods. The course is centered on evaluating existing business processes and choosing a system development methodology to improve upon it. Emphasis will be on analyzing, modeling and designing processes that improve business processes through the deployment of information technology. It will also emphasize the factors for effective communication and integration with users and user systems. It encourages interpersonal skill development with clients, end-users, team members and others associated with development, operation and maintenance of systems.

MIS 478 - QUANTITATIVE METHODS & ANALYSIS

This course addresses the importance of applying quantitative methods and analysis to the solution of business problems using structured problem solving and specialized data analysis software tools. Focus will be on solutions to problems of inefficiency, poor productivity and risky situations within the management of business and technical processes, projects and operations. Some of the methodologies covered are linear programming, PERT-CPM analysis, time series and decision tree analysis, forecasting, regression analysis and data mining. Key success factors in the course will be for the student to build on statistical techniques and spreadsheet tools covered in prerequisite(s) courses.

MIS 495 - MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SCIENCES CAPSTONE

The capstone course will encompass and consolidate all of the concepts covered in the MIS curriculum. In this course, students will manage an Information Systems project, design an appropriate database and incorporate both LAN and Web-based distributed information solution to support a business process, effectively document the system and incorporate elements of the general education into a successfully implemented information systems solution.

WEBD 236 - WEB INFORMATION SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING

This course builds web applications by employing server-side scripts that query relational databases. The student learns and reflects on two- and three-tier software architectures, separation of responsibility, model-view-controller pattern, basic security, and web frameworks. The student will design, code, test, debug, and document programs using a server-based scripting language. Note: This is a technology course in a technology program, and it requires the purchase of software that may be used in subsequent courses as well as being suitable for commercial work beyond completion of degree studies. For specific software requirements, consult the course syllabus.

Major Electives Course Descriptions

COMP 325 - HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION

This course covers a broad range of important topics within human computer interaction (HCI) and its implications for the design of interactive systems. By understanding the user's viewpoint and technology's effect on people, we can better plan for the selection, design, implementation, and use of technology so that the effects are positive rather than negative. The focus is on the design of interactive systems and human-computer interfaces. The course will cover the current literature and the knowns and unknowns about HCI and design. The design process is centered on the user and is based on a multidisciplinary approach through a synthesis of computer science, cognitive science, and psychology. HCI designers also use analytical and empirical techniques to assess, predict, and evaluate whether a design meets user requirements.

INFA 300 - PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS ANALYTICS

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to design, create, operate, and explain computational approaches, algorithms, models, and tools to solve problems involving the use of predictive analytics in a business context. Learning will be supported through relevant texts, lectures, research papers, collaboration sessions and projects using Oracle, Inc. analytics tools and technologies, performed both individually and in teams, in which students design, implement, and present predictive business analytic-based solutions to problems from appropriate business related case studies.

INFA 415 - INFORMATION ANALYTICS ARCHITECTURE

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to design and implement data gathering processes and information analytics architectures within data warehousing environments appropriate for supporting data mining and information analytics modeling applicable to the solving of typical operational, supply and demand problems encountered by organizations. Learning will be supported by relevant texts, lectures, research papers, collaboration sessions and projects, both individual and team-based. The database, data warehouse, and computational tools used in this course are Oracle Corporation products.

INFA 420 - INFORMATION MODELING

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to design and implement appropriate information models for decision support based on the requirements of the various functional areas of typical organizations, such as marketing, finance, and operations regarding management and executive decision making necessary for the successful current and future operation of typical organizations. Learning will be supported by relevant texts, lectures, research papers, collaboration sessions and projects, both individual and team-based, in which students will apply technologies such as expert systems, neural networks, graphical/visual interfaces, learning systems, data mining techniques, and decision analysis methodologies. The database, data warehouse, and computational tools used in this course are Oracle Corporation products.

ISEC 300 - PRINCIPLES OF INFORMATION SECURITY

In a highly connected, data intensive, and cost-focused business environment, the practice of information security not a business advantage; it is a customer requirement. Viruses, malware, trojans, denial of service attacks, phishing, and even Wiki leaks have become headline news. Failure to insure the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of data costs companies millions, if not billions of dollars in legal settlements, lost business, and trade secrets. In this breadth-based course, you will get an overview of information security principles and practices, including security models, risk management, access controls, intrusion detection and prevention, cryptography, software vulnerabilities, and ethical issues. Subsequent courses expand on this foundational material in much greater depth.

ITEC 430 - INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY PROJECT MANAGEMENT

This course provides an introduction to the concepts of information technology project management and techniques for initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling of resources to accomplish specific project goals. Both technical and behavioral aspects of project management are discussed. While the focus is on information technology projects, the principles follow the nine project management knowledge areas outlined in the Project Management Institute's PMBOKĀ® Guide Third Edition and thus are applicable to the management of any project. Topics will include integration, scope, time, cost, quality, human resource, communications, risk, and procurement management. Project management software utilization is emphasized.

MIS 410 - MIS INTERNSHIP

This course provides qualified students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for supervised professional training and experience in an actual work environment. This Internship is an ongoing seminar between the student, the faculty member and the employment supervisor. It involves an Internship Application and Learning Agreement, periodic meetings with the faculty representative, professional experience at a level equivalent to other senior-level courses and submission of material as established in the Internship Application and Learning Agreement. Participation cannot be guaranteed for all applicants.

MIS 480 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SCIENCES

A variable content course in information systems that will explore current topics or trends relevant to enhancing the career of information systems professionals. This course may be used to underwrite individual and independent study projects under the leadership of a faculty member, provided the subject matter does not overlap any other existing course, and subject to current departmental policies and restrictions.

MIS 499 - INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SCIENCES

Independent studies courses allow students in good academic standing to pursue learning in areas not covered by the regular curriculum or to extend study in areas presently taught. Study is under faculty supervision and graded on either a Pass/No Credit or a letter grade basis. (See the "Independent Studies" section of the Academic Bulletin for more details.)

The above list of courses only represents a portion of the courses required for a bachelor's degree. View the bachelor's degree full curriculum.

Additional Course Descriptions

Professional Core

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