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Public Administration Degree Program

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Public Administration - Subsequent Bachelor of Science Degree

Prerequisite Competencies

  • COMP 106 - INTRODUCTION TO SPREADSHEETS (1)

    COMP 106

    INTRODUCTION TO SPREADSHEETS

    Course Description

    This course focuses on using spreadsheets to solve business applications.
  • MATH 215 - STATISTICAL CONCEPTS (4)

    MATH 215

    STATISTICAL CONCEPTS

    Course Description

    This course introduces the student to statistics with business applications. The course covers both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics included are: measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion; graphical displays of data; linear regression; basic probability concepts; binomial and normal probability distributions; confidence intervals; and hypothesis testing. These topics will be covered using a basic knowledge of algebra and Microsoft Excel.
  • PF 321 - LEARNING STRATEGIES (2)

    PF 321

    LEARNING STRATEGIES

    Course Description

    This course prepares students to be successful lifelong learners both academically and in their chosen careers. Franklin courses require a high level of self-directed learning and focus on skills required in the workplace and the classroom that are easily transferable between the two environments. The course includes strategies for advancing communication skills, including the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments. The assignments and activities in the course are created to closely simulate teamwork found in the workplace.

Professional Core (20 hours)

  • ACCT 215 - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (4)

    ACCT 215

    FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

    Course Description

    An introduction to accounting emphasizing how general purpose financial statements communicate information about the business corporation's performance and position for users external to management. Approximately one third of the course emphasizes how the accountant processes and presents the information and includes exposure to recording transactions, adjusting balances and preparing financial statements for service and merchandise firms according to established rules and procedures. The balance of the course examines major elements of the statements such as cash, receivables, inventory, long'lived assets, depreciation, payroll, bonds, and other liabilities and stocks. Concepts of this course are applied to Managerial Accounting (ACCT 225). Students are advised to avoid any time lapse between these courses.
  • COMM 321 - ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION (4)

    COMM 321

    ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION

    Course Description

    The course examines the role of communication in organizations. Students will learn the major theories of organizational communication, identifying and defining primary concepts, and applying them to discussions of real-world situations. The role of technology, corporate culture, leadership, teamwork, ethics, and diversity in communication is examined. Effective communication in global organizations and critiques of organization communication systems and structures are also presented.

    OR COMM 335 - COMMUNICATION IN GROUPS AND TEAMS (4)

    COMM 335

    COMMUNICATION IN GROUPS AND TEAMS

    Course Description

    The course examines current theories and best practices of working collaboratively in professional contexts. Students apply these concepts to analyze their own work experience, generating strategies for how to improve their performance in work groups. Students will learn basic project management skills and work in online virtual teams to complete a final communication project.
  • HRM 300 - HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (4)

    HRM 300

    HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT

    Course Description

    An introduction to the human resources function and related elements and activities. The course outlines the roles and functions of members of the human resources department, as well as educating others outside human resources, in how their roles include human resources-related activities. The student will learn about the evolution in human resources management as we know it today. Emphasis is placed on the modern day importance of HRM and the new "corporate view" of the function. Additionally, the student will be exposed to the view of HRM from the perception of both management and subordinate employees. The importance of maintaining fair and equitable compensation and benefit programs will be discussed. The student will be exposed to practical situations and problem solving regarding areas of employee counseling, discipline and termination. Equal Employment Opportunity will be discussed in order for the student to understand its need, importance and the legal issues surrounding it. Other critical areas of training and development, staffing and strategy will also be explored.
  • MIS 200 - MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (4)

    MIS 200

    MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    Course Description

    The purpose of this course is to provide the fundamentals associated with the management of information technology in a business enterprise. These fundamentals are business concepts in which the influence of information technology has caused change or brought about new concepts. Special emphasis will be placed on understanding the managerial issues that are relevant to usage of computers. The student will be given problems isolating these issues and will be asked to propose solutions with alternatives.
  • WRIT 320 - BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WRITING (4)

    WRIT 320

    BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WRITING

    Course Description

    This is an advanced composition course that focuses on writing for business and professional purposes. Students will review the writing conventions commonly expected within business and professional environments, as well as strategies for analyzing rhetorical situations within those environments. Coursework includes analysis, revision, and research exercises, as well as substantial practice in composing business correspondence. The final project is an extensive, researched business proposal developed in stages and presented to the class. Students will be encouraged to relate course materials to their major programs and workplace experiences.

Major Area (24 hours)

  • AMGT 450 - ORGANIZATIONAL SUPERVISION (4)

    AMGT 450

    ORGANIZATIONAL SUPERVISION

    Course Description

    This course is designed to provide the framework and foundation of what it takes to be a first line manager or supervisor. Students will be introduced to the many skills required of a supervisor such as planning and controlling activities to accomplish organizational goals. Areas such as communication, ethical decision-making, conflict management, interpersonal relations and employee development will be explored.
  • PUAD 295 - AMERICAN GOVERNMENT IN ACTION (4)

    PUAD 295

    AMERICAN GOVERNMENT IN ACTION

    Course Description

    The course examines the American system of government and how government affects and interacts with individuals and organizations in society. Students learn how politics, law, and the structure and principles of American government impact citizens, public policy, and the administration of public and private organizations. Students apply fundamental political theories and administration law principles in personal and professional contexts.
  • PUAD 305 - INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (4)

    PUAD 305

    INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

    Course Description

    Students are introduced to the field and profession of public administration. Students learn to think and act as ethical public administration professionals by developing a broad understanding of the political and organizational environment in which public administrators work and by applying fundamental analytical, decision- making, and communication skills. The professional knowledge and skills explored in the course provide a foundation for subsequent public administration courses.
  • PUAD 350 - ANALYSIS FOR PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT (4)

    PUAD 350

    ANALYSIS FOR PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT

    Course Description

    Students learn core concepts and techniques for analyzing and improving the programs, operations, and performance of government and nonprofit organizations. Students also examine the risks and benefits of undertaking performance improvement efforts within mission-driven organizations operating in political environments.
  • PUAD 420 - GOVERNMENT & NONPROFIT BUDGETING (4)

    PUAD 420

    GOVERNMENT & NONPROFIT BUDGETING

    Course Description

    Students learn fundamental budgeting, accounting, and financial management concepts and techniques necessary for planning, analysis, and decision making in government and nonprofit organizations. Students also examine the competing values and politics that underlie and impact the budget process and financial decisions. Finally, students apply skills for effectively communicating financial analysis methods and conclusions with colleagues, elected officials, the media, and the public.
  • PUAD 495 - PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION CAPSTONE (4)

    PUAD 495

    PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION CAPSTONE

    Course Description

    The capstone course is a practicum in which students analyze an important administrative problem relevant for a government or nonprofit organization. Students create an administrative action plan for addressing their chosen administrative problem by integrating concepts and skills learned in the public administration program and the student's specialization area.

Major Electives (16 hours)

Select 16 hours of coursework from within or across any subject area offered at the University. Suggested pathways are to take the courses listed for any one of Franklin’s undergraduate academic minors. Please note that these courses will only count toward the Public Administration major and not towards a minor. PUAD 295 and PUAD 305 must be completed before taking any major area elective courses, and any prerequisite requirements must be honored.

Additional Requirements

Each candidate for a subsequent degree must successfully complete in residence at Franklin University a minimum of 30 credit hours of 200 level courses or above, of which a minimum of 16 credit hours must be in major area courses at the 300 or 400 level. If the student is a previous Franklin bachelor of science degree graduate, the 30 credits must be earned after the first Franklin B.S. degree was awarded. If the required courses for a subsequent degree total less than 30 credit hours, the student may take Free Elective courses to achieve residency. Either PF 121 or PF 321 must be taken prior to the first BLF course, or it may be taken concurrently with the first 15-week BLF course. Students also must meet the University algebra competency requirement

A minimum GPA of 2.25 is required in the major area, and each major area course must be completed with a grade of “C” or better to count toward degree requirements.

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Please see the Academic Bulletin for the complete list of degree and residency requirements.

Additional Curriculum

Public Administration - Bachelor of Science Degree

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