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Public Relations Degree Program - Online & On-Campus

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Public Relations - Subsequent Bachelor of Science Degree

Looking to earn an additional bachelor’s degree? This degree is specifically designed for students who have already completed a bachelor's degree or higher.

Prerequisite Competencies

  • COMM 107 - INTRODUCTION TO WEB PRESENTATION & PUBLISHING (1)

    COMM 107

    INTRODUCTION TO WEB PRESENTATION & PUBLISHING

    Course Description

    This course is an introduction to the use of Open Source Content Management Systems (CMS) for creating Web sites. It will provide students with the basic knowledge required to design, build, and maintain an informational Web site.
  • COMP 106 - INTRODUCTION TO SPREADSHEETS (1)

    COMP 106

    INTRODUCTION TO SPREADSHEETS

    Course Description

    This course focuses on using spreadsheets to solve business applications.
  • HUMN 210 - INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC & CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS (2)

    HUMN 210

    INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC & CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS

    Course Description

    The goal of this course is to help you improve as a critical, logical thinker. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. You will discover how to apply these valuable skills to your studies and everyday life, learning how to overcome obstacles to critical thinking, and how to avoid being deceived by means of misleading reasoning.
  • MATH 215 - STATISTICAL CONCEPTS (4)

    MATH 215

    STATISTICAL CONCEPTS

    Course Description

    This course introduces the student to statistics with business applications. The course covers both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics included are: measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion; graphical displays of data; linear regression; basic probability concepts; binomial and normal probability distributions; confidence intervals; and hypothesis testing. These topics will be covered using a basic knowledge of algebra and Microsoft Excel.
  • PF 321 - LEARNING STRATEGIES (2)

    PF 321

    LEARNING STRATEGIES

    Course Description

    This course prepares students to be successful lifelong learners both academically and in their chosen careers. Franklin courses require a high level of self-directed learning and focus on skills required in the workplace and the classroom that are easily transferable between the two environments. The course includes strategies for advancing communication skills, including the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments. The assignments and activities in the course are created to closely simulate teamwork found in the workplace.
  • PSYC 110 - GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY (4)

    PSYC 110

    GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY

    Course Description

    A survey of the various fields of study comprising modern scientific psychology. The course examines the theories, research findings, and applications in each of the major areas of psychology, with the goal of providing students with practice information they can apply to their personal and professional lives. The topic areas covered in the course include learning and memory, motivation and emotion, human development, theories of personality, psychopathology, and social behavior.
  • SOCL 110 - INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (4)

    SOCL 110

    INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

    Course Description

    Sociology is the scientific study of group behavior - whether the groups are dyads, small groups, associations, bureaucracies, societies, publics, aggregates, social movements, or mobs, etc. This introductory course introduces the student to sociological principles and theoretical perspectives that facilitate understanding the norms, values, structure and process of the various types of groups into which people organize. The course focuses on applying the scientific method to studying social problems (e.g. poverty, crime, sexism and racism) and basic institutions (i.e. family, government, economy, religion, education). Students will develop their "sociological imagination" as a way of understanding what their lives are and can be in relation to the larger social forces at work in local, national, and international environments.
  • SPCH 100 - SPEECH COMMUNICATION (4)

    SPCH 100

    SPEECH COMMUNICATION

    Course Description

    A basic public speaking course intended to improve the student's ability to think critically and to communicate orally. Theory and practice are provided in various speaking situations. Each student is required to speak before an audience, but class work also involves reading, gathering and organizing information, writing and listening.

Professional Core (24 hours)

  • COMM 150 - INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION (4)

    COMM 150

    INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION

    Course Description

    By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking.
  • COMM 315 - COMMUNICATION ETHICS (4)

    COMM 315

    COMMUNICATION ETHICS

    Course Description

    This course examines the strategies involved in effective, ethical communication in professional contexts. Students examine principles of ethical organizational communication and the temporal/cultural/social forces behind those principles, as well as apply reasoning and critical thinking in individual and group assignments. Comparing values and perspectives from diverse cultures, students will respond to cases in an intercultural professional environment.
  • MGMT 312 - PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (4)

    MGMT 312

    PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT

    Course Description

    This course explores the basic concepts and processes of management. Students will explore the functional roles and processes of planning, leading, organizing, and controlling comprising the manager role. Students develop skills related to the manager function and required in today's competitive environment.
  • MKTG 300 - MARKETING (4)

    MKTG 300

    MARKETING

    Course Description

    A general course in marketing theory and methods. Among topics discussed are the importance of marketing, the interrelationship of the different phases of marketing, the differences between the marketing of goods and services, wholesaling, retailing, pricing strategies, analysis of markets, and distribution.
  • PSYC 204 - PRINCIPLES OF MOTIVATION (4)

    PSYC 204

    PRINCIPLES OF MOTIVATION

    Course Description

    This course is a systematic study of various theories and approaches to work motivation, with assessments of the research and practice evidence supporting their scientific validity and applicability to the work environment. Students will explore factors that contribute to motivation and strategies that today's manager can use to become a successful motivator.
  • WRIT 320 - BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WRITING (4)

    WRIT 320

    BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WRITING

    Course Description

    This is an advanced composition course for juniors and seniors which focuses on business, technical and professional writing. Skills taught include audience analysis; research methods; questionnaire, interview and survey techniques; letters; data collection, interpretation and documentation; graphic illustration; and composition of reports in special formats. Instruction and practice are provided in writing various types of reports such as résumés, proposals, summaries, research reports and instructions for user manuals, and in presenting committee and oral reports. Students will be encouraged to relate course materials to their major programs and their workplaces.

Major Area (24 hours)

  • PBRL 325 - PUBLIC RELATIONS (4)

    PBRL 325

    PUBLIC RELATIONS

    Course Description

    A general course in the technique of establishing and maintaining public relations. Activities span a variety of media to influence public opinion and manage an organization's reputation.
  • PBRL 350 - MEDIA RESEARCH AND WRITING (4)

    PBRL 350

    MEDIA RESEARCH AND WRITING

    Course Description

    This course explores approaches and techniques for conducting research and writing within key public relations contexts. Students in this course will examine and utilize research techniques and methodologies that are essential for public relations professionals. Components of this course will include: journalistic research, copywriting, research and writing for broadcast, web research, writing for the Web, transforming technical information for general audiences, and media release writing. Additionally, this course will examine the ethics involved in researching and writing for public relations contexts.
  • PBRL 425 - MEDIA AND CRISIS COMMUNICATION (4)

    PBRL 425

    MEDIA AND CRISIS COMMUNICATION

    Course Description

    Today's public relations professionals have entered a new era where preparedness to respond rapidly to various levels of crisis is essential. Building a positive reputation through the strategic management of communications with internal and external audiences during good times is a necessary foundation for withstanding negative press. Utilizing analysis techniques, public relations tactics, and hands-on projects, students will evaluate crisis situations, create and implement a strategic crisis communication plan, and learn to coach the corporate spokesperson and manage the media, while maintaining the organization's reputation.
  • PBRL 445 - PUBLIC RELATIONS & PROMOTIONAL STRATEGY (4)

    PBRL 445

    PUBLIC RELATIONS & PROMOTIONAL STRATEGY

    Course Description

    Students research, develop and implement persuasive and promotional campaign strategies appropriate to corporate, governmental and non-profit organizations. This advanced course is designed for those who desire specialized skills in public relations and promotional communication. Emphasis is placed on various tactics including investor relations and employee communications.
  • PBRL 450 - RHETORIC AND SOCIAL INFLUENCE (4)

    PBRL 450

    RHETORIC AND SOCIAL INFLUENCE

    Course Description

    This course examines how text, images, sound-bites, speeches, and other media operate to influence, define, and change public identity and thought. Students in this course will look at these verbal and non-verbal influences and how they mold and shape public discourse, cultural understanding, and our day-to-day life. Additionally, this course will examine the role of persuasion and attitudinal change in managing conflict and making decisions within various communicative contexts and amongst various publics.
  • PBRL 495 - PUBLIC RELATIONS CAPSTONE (4)

    PBRL 495

    PUBLIC RELATIONS CAPSTONE

    Course Description

    This course examines the strategies involved in planning and managing communication in professional contexts and the ways these strategies are informed by the integration of information provided by other key areas. Students examine principles of integrated applied communication, creating written and web-based communication products in class. Working in collaborative teams, students complete a project that demonstrates planning and managing communication for organizational goals. The course includes media production of communications for a client organization.

Major Electives (4 hours)

Select 4 hours from:

  • COMM 321 - ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION (4)

    COMM 321

    ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION

    Course Description

    The course examines the role of communication in organizations. Students will learn the major theories of organizational communication, identifying and defining primary concepts, and applying them to discussions of real-world situations. The role of technology, corporate culture, leadership, teamwork, ethics, and diversity in communication is examined. Effective communication in global organizations and critiques of organization communication systems and structures are also presented.
  • COMM 335 - COMMUNICATION IN GROUPS AND TEAMS (4)

    COMM 335

    COMMUNICATION IN GROUPS AND TEAMS

    Course Description

    The course examines current theories and best practices of working collaboratively in professional contexts. Students apply these concepts to analyze their own work experience, generating strategies for how to improve their performance in work groups. Students will learn basic project management skills and work in online virtual teams to complete a final communication project.
  • COMM 355 - INTRODUCTION TO GRANT WRITING FOR NON-PROFITS (4)

    COMM 355

    INTRODUCTION TO GRANT WRITING FOR NON-PROFITS

    Course Description

    This course will enable students to recognize when a grant might be appropriate as a source of funds for a non-profit organization or project, identify and understand non-profit status, adhere to conventions and standards associated with successful grant applications, locate grant opportunities, analyze grant requirements, prepare metrics for success, and develop a written grant proposal. This course will provide an opportunity for students to extend and apply their communication skills. Students pursuing this course will also leverage interdisciplinary insights to solve a real-world problem.
  • MIS 320 - TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION (4)

    MIS 320

    TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION

    Course Description

    This course will prepare students for the bi-directional technical communication demands specific to computer and information systems. Topics include technical research methods and approaches, critical analysis of technical documents, synthesis of data, information and knowledge gained through research and critical analysis, creation of accurate technical documents, and effective delivery of technical material via oral presentations supported by visual media.
  • MKTG 350 - PERSUASIVE STRATEGIES (4)

    MKTG 350

    PERSUASIVE STRATEGIES

    Course Description

    This course focuses on the most prevalent promotional and persuasive approaches used in written, oral, and electronic communication. Students investigate the psychological aspects of persuasion and influence. Methodologies that incorporate analyses of audience, situation, and purpose are evaluated. The application of effective strategies for sales, product introduction, and advocacy for a position are emphasized.
  • MKTG 430 - RELATIONSHIP MARKETING (4)

    MKTG 430

    RELATIONSHIP MARKETING

    Course Description

    Students develop skills in planning, constructing and organizing one-to-one marketing activities. Included in these activities are collaborative relationships between consumers and sellers that can be applied by both small and large organizations. New technologies in interactive marketing and in database creation and implementation will be studied.
  • PBRL 410 - PUBLIC RELATIONS INTERNSHIP (1 - 4)

    PBRL 410

    PUBLIC RELATIONS INTERNSHIP

    Course Description

    This course provides qualified students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for supervised professional training and experience in an actual work environment. This Internship is an ongoing seminar between the student, the faculty member and the employment supervisor. It involves an Internship Application and Learning Agreement, periodic meetings with the faculty representative, professional experience at a level equivalent to other senior-level courses and submission of material as established in the Internship Application and Learning Agreement. Participation cannot be guaranteed for all applicants.
  • PBRL 480 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN PUBLIC RELATIONS (4)

    PBRL 480

    SPECIAL TOPICS IN PUBLIC RELATIONS

    Course Description

    A variable content classroom course in Public Relations in which students pursue topics or subjects of current interest that are not part of the regular curriculum. A specific course description will be published online in the Course Schedule for the trimester the course is offered.
  • PBRL 499 - INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN PUBLIC RELATIONS (1 - 4)

    PBRL 499

    INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN PUBLIC RELATIONS

    Course Description

    Independent studies courses allow students in good academic standing to pursue learning in areas not covered by the regular curriculum or to extend study in areas presently taught. Study takes place under faculty supervision and graded on either a Pass/No Credit or a letter grade basis. (See the "Independent Studies" section of the Academic Bulletin for more details.)

Additional Requirements

Each candidate for a subsequent degree must successfully complete in residence at Franklin University a minimum of 30 credit hours of 200 level courses or above, of which a minimum of 16 credit hours must be in major area courses at the 300 or 400 level. If the student is a previous Franklin bachelor of science degree graduate, the 30 credits must be earned after the first Franklin B.S. degree was awarded. If the required courses for a subsequent degree total less than 30 credit hours, the student may take Free Elective courses to achieve residency. Either PF 121 or PF 321 must be taken prior to the first BLF course, or it may be taken concurrently with the first 15-week BLF course. Students also must meet the University algebra competency requirement

A minimum GPA of 2.25 is required in the major area, and each major area course must be completed with a grade of “C” or better to count toward degree requirements.

Please see the Academic Bulletin for the complete list of degree and residency requirements.

Additional Curriculum

Public Relations - Bachelor of Science Degree

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Build well-rounded skills and learn the industry specific knowledge you will need to be successful in your career.

Public Relations - Associate of Science Degree

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Begin building your educational foundation with a curriculum that has a broad base in general education while touching upon a specific area of study.

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