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Social Sciences Degree Program

Social Sciences Degree Program Program OverviewProgram DetailsWhy Choose Franklin
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Major Area Course Descriptions

COMM 335 - COMMUNICATION IN GROUPS AND TEAMS

The course examines current theories and best practices of working collaboratively in professional contexts. Students apply these concepts to analyze their own work experience, generating strategies for how to improve their performance in work groups. Students will learn basic project management skills and work in online virtual teams to complete a final communication project.

HUMN 345 - PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE

The goal of this course is to help students sharpen their critical thinking skills by covering key principles of knowledge, reasoning, and evidence. Students will be introduced to the characteristics, methodology, and limitations of science in contrast to other alleged sources of knowledge like faith, intuition, mysticism, perception, introspection, memory, and reason. Students will discover how to apply these valuable principles to their studies and to everyday life, learning how to overcome obstacles to critical thinking and how to avoid being deceived by means of bogus sciences and extraordinary claims.

IDST 301 - CREATIVE THINKING

Creativity is neither magical nor bestowed upon us as some kind of genetic gift. As choreographer Twyla Tharp reminds us, the romanticized version of the gift of creative genius, as depicted in the movie Amadeus, is hogwash. She reminds us, "There are no 'natural' geniuses. No one worked harder than Mozart. By the time he was twenty-eight years old, his hands were deformed because of all of the hours he had spent practicing, performing, and gripping a quill pen to compose." This course considers creativity as a muscle that must be exercised, not as a gift, and it provides concrete exercises, as well as neurological research, the HBDI Innovation Model, in addition to various philosophies of creativity to encourage creative problem solving and creative thinking.

SOCL 335 - APPLIED RESEARCH METHODS

Applied Research Methods introduces students to foundational issues of social scientific research - that is, research entailing the application of the scientific method to the study of human behavior. Students will examine the strengths and weaknesses of major quantitative and qualitative data collection techniques as well as the processes involved in planning and executing such projects and the standards of evaluating the quality of data.

SOSC 495 - SOCIAL SCIENCES CAPSTONE

The Social Sciences capstone provides the opportunity for students to demonstrate mastery of the learning outcomes for the social sciences program through completion of a major project. This will be a self-selected project reflecting the student's interests and career aspirations. Students are given latitude to select one of two methods for project completion. Those opting for a theoretical approach will identify a societal opportunity, examine that opportunity from the perspective of at least two social science disciplines, and devise an interdisciplinary strategy for exploiting the opportunity for the betterment of society. Students choosing an applied approach will complete a project in a social service setting, cooperating with the capstone professor and site supervisor to design and complete an intervention to further the mission of the organization. This is a writing intensive course requiring a formal proposal and comprehensive report upon project completion.

WRIT 220 - RESEARCH WRITING: EXPLORING PROFESSIONAL IDENTITIES

This is an intermediate course focusing on the composition of research papers. Students in this course prepare to be active participants in professional discourse communities by examining and practicing the writing conventions associated with their own fields of study and work. By calling attention to the conventions of disciplinary writing, the course also prepares students for upper-division college writing and the special conventions of advanced academic discourse. Course activities include three extended research papers, semi-formal writing addressing interdisciplinary communication, and readings fostering critical engagement with disciplinary conversations.

WRIT 320 - BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WRITING

This is an advanced composition course that focuses on writing for business and professional purposes. Students will review the writing conventions commonly expected within business and professional environments, as well as strategies for analyzing rhetorical situations within those environments. Coursework includes analysis, revision, and research exercises, as well as substantial practice in composing business correspondence. The final project is an extensive, researched business proposal developed in stages and presented to the class. Students will be encouraged to relate course materials to their major programs and workplace experiences.

Major Electives Course Descriptions

Anthropology

ANTH 215 - CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
This course exposes students to the principles, concepts, research methods, and applications of cultural anthropology. Students will be introduced to the wide range of variation in social and institutional arrangements found historically and cross-culturally. From language to gender roles, from bases of social stratification to causes and consequences of conformity, from the simpler life in foraging societies to the seeming-chaos in modern post-industrial societies: students will examine the enormous variation in solutions to the requisites of social life.
ANTH 480 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY
A variable content classroom course in anthropology in which students pursue topics or subjects of current interest that are not part of the regular curriculum. A specific course description will be published online in the Course Schedule for the trimester the course is offered.

Criminal Justice

CJAD 210 - INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION
This is an introductory course designed to expose students to the various Major elements of the criminal justice system (police, courts, and corrections). Students will learn about the ways in which the various systems interact, the processing of offenders, the various forms of punishment and the alternatives to punishment. The future of the criminal justice system will also be discussed.
CJAD 240 - INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINOLOGY
This course will focus on theories of crime and types of offending. Topics related the causation, control and prevention of criminal behavior will be addressed in this course.
CJAD 310 - COURTS AND CRIMINAL PROCEDURE
This course addresses the requirements for processing criminal offenders through the court system. Topics include structure of the court system in the U.S., evidentiary standards, constitutional protections, the role and importance of case law, and the role of the prosecutor and defense attorney in the courts.
CJAD 315 - POLICING IN AMERICA
This course will provide the student with an overview of the philosophy and history of policing in America. Students will learn about personnel and management issues related to policing. Students will also be exposed to topics including police discretion, police use of force, civil liability, police culture, and the impact of the war on terrorism on police operations and practices.
CJAD 320 - CORRECTIONS IN AMERICA
This course considers contemporary corrections in America. This course will include a review of recent corrections-related research and a discussion of the role corrections plays in the criminal justice system. Topics covered will include a historical overview of corrections in America, alternatives to incarceration, types and functions of various prison systems in corrections, and various categories of inmates within the corrections system.
CJAD 330 - JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY
This course will address the history of the U.S. juvenile justice system and the nature and extent of youth crime. It will focus on the correlates and theoretical perspectives used to explain juvenile delinquency all within a framework of current research and strategies used to prevent, treat, and control youth crime. Students will analyze and apply these concepts to the structure within which juveniles are taken into custody, treated, processed, rehabilitated or punished in an integrated and collaborative environment. Finally, students will examine basic criminal justice research methods and the role of science and inquiry in criminal justice.
CJAD 415 - CONTEMPORARY POLICING STRATEGIES AND ISSUES
Students will review contemporary policing strategies to include: Community policing, Problem Oriented Policing and other strategies related to crime prevention and crime reduction. Students will also be exposed to current issues related to both the internal and external environments of police agencies. Issues related to police deviance and ethical issues will also be addressed.
CJAD 425 - PROBATION AND PAROLE
This course addresses the role of probation, parole and community corrections in the U.S. corrections system. Topics include management and supervision of a full range of intermediate alternatives to prison and jail including pretrial release, diversion, economic sanctions, probation, residential supervision, and other unique alternatives. Philosophies and theories of offender treatment and punishment will be analyzed within the context and application of public policy. Parole will be examined and various programs will be compared and contrasted in light of best evidence and economic policies in the U.S. A particular focus will be paid to successful reentry and wraparound programming. Risk assessment will be integrated throughout as a contemporary and data-driven means of individualized rehabilitative and treatment models that seek to lower recidivism and improve public safety.
CJAD 430 - JUVENILE CORRECTIONS
This course will present students with an introduction and history of juvenile corrections. More in-depth coverage will focus on contemporary sentencing and correctional strategies including alternative sanctions. Students will be exposed to treatment and rehabilitative programmatic trends both inside and outside secure institutions. Additional topics will include correctional staff training, risk assessment, and evaluative studies both quantitative and qualitative.
CJAD 440 - SOCIOLOGY OF DEVIANT BEHAVIOR
Students will become familiar with the various theories of deviant behavior and discuss deviance in terms of both criminal and non-criminal behavior. Topics covered in this course will include types of deviance, deviance and crime, stigma, physical disabilities, mental disorders, and recent forms of deviance.
CJAD 450 - CRIMINAL JUSTICE MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION
This course will examine the basic concepts of management and administration as applied to agencies in the criminal justice system. Emphasis will be placed on issues related to the effective management and administration of criminal justice agencies. Topics covered will include environmental influence; conflict, power, and ethical issues; motivation, leadership, and communication. The concept of the service quality approach will also be considered.
CJAD 455 - ETHICS IN THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM
This course will address the topics of ethical and moral values as they pertain to the criminal justice system. Topics covered will include ethics and the police, racial discrimination in the criminal justice system, the purpose of punishment, ethics in corrections, and the ethics of criminal justice policy making.
CJAD 480 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION
A variable content classroom course in Criminal Justice Administration in which students pursue topics or subjects of current interest that are not part of the regular curriculum. A specific course description will be published online in the Course Schedule for the trimester the course is offered.

Economics

ECON 210 - INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS
An introduction to economic theory involving the examination of how decision making by firms and individuals is shaped by economic forces. Emphasis is placed on demand, supply, market equilibrium analysis, and basic market structure models. The invisible hand as the driving force for economic decisions as well as market externalities are discussed. The class concentrates on providing a balanced approach to studying economic agents' behavior and the global implications and outcomes.
ECON 220 - INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS
An introduction to economic theory involving the basic underlying causes and principles of the operation of an economic system. Emphasis is placed on studying the economy as a whole. Issues of inflation, unemployment, taxation, business cycles and growth are discussed in the context of the global economic system.
ECON 321 - INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS
This course provides a further examination of profit maximizing strategies by firms and individuals. Evaluation of consumer behavior, firms' production decisions, and market power are at the core of the analysis. Special attention is given to the asymmetric information considerations, game theory, and externalities.
ECON 322 - INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS
This course examines the differences between the economy in the short run and in the long run. A number of macroeconomic models are considered, and the results are used to conduct macroeconomic policy discussion on stabilization policies and government debt.
ECON 420 - FORECASTING
This course provides a hands-on experience for creating working econometric models to forecast business activities, including revenues, costs, and profits. Trends, seasonal and cyclical fluctuations, as well as error term dynamics, are analyzed.
ECON 450 - HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT
This course provides a broad introduction to the development of economic thought through time. The ideas and concepts are considered in their historical perspective. Contributions by leading economists, emergence of a variety of schools of economic thought, their relevance to the current economic problems constitute the core of the analysis.
ECON 480 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS
A variable content classroom course in Economics in which students pursue topics or subjects of current interest that are not part of the regular curriculum. A specific course description will be published online in the Course Schedule for the trimester the course is offered.

Psychology

PSYC 204 - PRINCIPLES OF MOTIVATION
This course is a systematic study of various theories and approaches to work motivation, with assessments of the research and practice evidence supporting their scientific validity and applicability to the work environment. Students will explore factors that contribute to motivation and strategies that today's manager can use to become a successful motivator.
PSYC 310 - THE PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
This psychology based course provides evidenced-based information and application strategies for improving personal and professional adjustment and effectiveness. The purpose of this course is to enable students to address and utilize more of their inherent potential. Students will use a self-coaching model to apply principles and methods taken from a variety of current sources, i.e. emotional and social intelligence, multiple intelligences, and positive psychology and executive coaching. The primary course outcome will be a plan for effecting improved adjustment and performance in students' personal and professional lives.
PSYC 315 - APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY: THEORY TO PRACTICE
This course is an exploration of the expanding field of Applied Psychology. The framework of inquiry incorporates an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the current state of the field and its career possibilities. The principal focus is on applying scientific and humanistic perspectives derived from psychology to individual, social, and institutional opportunities.
PSYC 325 - COACHING IN ORGANIZATIONS
This course is designed to introduce students to the use of coaching skills for improving the adjustment and performance of individuals in an organizational setting. Topics to be covered include: the scope of coaching practice, optimal practitioner characteristics, benefits for coaches, related organizational dynamics, and coaching interventions and resources. This course also includes an emphasis on experimental learning through coaching practice activities.
PSYC 420 - ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION IN ORGANIZATIONS
This course explores the use of psychological instrumentation as a means for improving individual and organizational performance. The emphasis is on the assessment of strengths and positive psychological functioning. Students will become acquainted with various psychological instruments including their selection, construction, and administration. Additionally, students will gain experience with the interpretation and delivery of instrument results and their translation into individual and organizational improvement interventions.
PSYC 480 - ST: PSYCHOLOGY
A variable content classroom course in Psychology in which students pursue topics or subjects of current interest that are not part of the regular curriculum. A specific course description will be published online in the Course Schedule for the trimester the course is offered.

Sociology

SOCL 210 - PUBLIC SOCIOLOGY
Course materials will introduce students to the typical introductory sociological concepts and theories which prepare students to begin seeing how their socio-historical contexts help to shape who they are and to shape the larger communities in which they live. Innovative aspects of this course help students to reflect on the deeper and more personal question pertaining to what kinds of communities they want to live in and what roles they are willing to play in bringing those communities to fruition.
SOCL 310 - DIVERSITY IN THE WORKPLACE
This course explores the spectrum of cultural diversity and its consequences within the workplace. While the focus is on the American workplace, some cross-cultural material is examined in relation to current trends toward globalization and multinational corporations. Important themes running throughout the course relate to recognizing and actualizing the benefits of cultural diversity in the workplace as coworkers and leaders minimize the misunderstandings that frequently accompany diversity.
SOCL 345 - SOCIOLOGY OF WORK AND ORGANIZATIONS
This course examines the mutual influence of social arrangements, on one hand, and business structures and processes on the other. The course begins with a study of pre-business-oriented social life in the earliest human societies with special focus on typical biography, values, assumptions about reality, and norms regulating desires and needs within the limited marketplace. The course will follow the evolution of business and social elements through the Industrial and Post-Industrial Eras and examine ongoing changes as we move toward the Molecular Technology economy now appearing on our horizon. Ending discussions will focus on the role imagination and innovation play in harnessing developments and carrying them into our future society and future business endeavors. The course shares common elements with other courses offered at Franklin University but is unique in terms of its placement of business within a socio-historical context.
SOCL 355 - COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH
This course explores the social context of mental health treatment and delivery of mental health care. The delivery of mental health care is rife with public policy debates stemming from the diversity of opinion among policy makers, treatment specialists, consumers of mental health care and their families, for-profit entities such as pharmaceutical companies, and the public. Debates that highlight this course include but are not limited to the following: the proper role of medication in mental health care, balancing patients' rights with the desire for public safety, influence of the Affordable Care Act on mental health diagnosis and treatment, and differences between mental health care in Ohio and that found in other locales.
SOCL 400 - SOCIAL JUSTICE
This course explores the types of cultural diversity in society and the effects such diversity has on attitudes, values, beliefs, behavior, and life chances. Human beings vary by many dimensions including race/ethnicity, national origin, sex and sexual orientation, gender and gender orientation, social class, age, religion, and more. Students will explore the nature of inequality as a socially constructed consequence of diversity, the nature of social and institutional strategies that maintain such inequality, and how social arrangements may be altered to mitigate against this inequality for individual as well as social benefit.
SOCL 480 - ST: SOCIOLOGY
A variable content classroom course in Sociology in which students pursue topics or subjects of current interest that are not part of the regular curriculum. A specific course description will be published online in the Course Schedule for the trimester the course is offered.
SOSC 205 - ISSUES IN SOCIAL SCIENCES
Issues in the Social Sciences facilitates exploration of current, sometimes controversial, social problems and solutions. The course takes an evidence-based approach to considering three broad subject areas in the field of social psychology - environmental sustainability, personal and public health and psychosocial aspects of the U.S. legal system. These topics are employed to exemplify how social science research informs public opinion and efficacious policies and interventions to promote positive social change. Class activities are designed to promote critical assessment of students' own opinions and the ability to present well-informed arguments.

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