Faculty and Staff Profiles

Todd Whittaker, M.S.

Department Chair, CIS, Franklin University

 

Contact Information

Profile

Todd Whittaker currently serves as the Information Technology and Information Security Program Chair at Franklin University. He has more than 20 years experience in computer related fields and has previously held positions as an associate professor at DeVry University, software engineer at Battelle Memorial Institute, and UNIX systems administrator at the University of Akron. He has extensive knowledge of object-oriented programming languages, design patterns, development processes, systems administration, and technology education.

Todd is responsible for a number of courses in the Computer Science, Information Technology, Cyber Security, and Web Development majors.

When not writing about himself in the third person, he enjoys spending time with his wife and children, and teaching in a small home group Bible study.

Education

Master of Science - Computer + Information Science
12/01/1998
The Ohio State University
Columbus, OH

Master of Science - Computer Science
06/01/1997
University of Akron

Bachelor of Science - Computer Science
05/01/1995
University of Akron

Work Experience

Franklin University
Department Chair, CIS, Franklin University (5/18/2017 - Present)
Department of Computer Science + Mathematics

Publications and Presentations

Designing courses for hybrid instruction: Principles to practice (Published: 2012)
Volume 27 | Issue 4 | Page(s) 6-14
Publisher: Journal of Computing Sciences in Colleges
Author(s): R. Wood
http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2167431.2167434

Designing courses for hybrid instruction: Principles to practice (Published: 2012)
Volume 27 | Issue 4 | Page(s) 6-14
Publisher: Journal of Computing Sciences in Colleges
Author(s): R. Wood

Face-to-face Experiences for Online Students: Effective, Efficient, and Engaging Hybrid Classes (Published: 2011)
Volume 26 | Issue 4 | Page(s) 140-148
Publisher: Journal of Computing Sciences in Colleges
Author(s): T. Whittaker, E. Bonakdarian
http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1953573.1953596

Mixing It Up: More Experiments in Hybrid Learning (Published: 2010)
Volume 25 | Issue 4 | Page(s) 97–103
Publisher: Journal of Computing Sciences in Colleges(USA)
Author(s): Y. Yang
http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1734797.1734817

Merging Worlds: When Virtual Meets Physical: an Experiment with Hybrid Learning (Published: 2009)
Volume 25 | Issue 1 | Page(s) 61–67
Publisher: Journal of Computing Sciences in Colleges(USA)
Author(s): T. Whittaker
http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1619221.1619234

Parallel Algorithms for the Third Extension of the Sieve of Eratosthenes (Published: 1999)
Publisher: Midwest Conference on Parallel Processing(Kent, OH)
Author(s): T. Whittaker, K. Liszka

"Critical Thinking in the Information Technology Program: a Deciding Factor for Employability" (2014)
Presentation Type: Poster
Learning Showcase(Ohio)
Sponsored by: Franklin University
Meeting Type: Conference
“[C]ritical thinking [as analysis and evaluation] is an active skill-building process, not a subject for passive academic study.” Thus, it cannot be mastered through the technical content of a major alone. This suggests that there is a crucial gap between a purely vocationally focused approach to teaching and the higher-cognitive skills (i.e., learning through connecting ideas together) necessary for students “to compete successfully in securing employment or progressing in their chosen field.” Business leaders and educators around the globe realize that critical thinking is in short supply across the board, and managers and employees must be able to think critically for both personal and organizational success. Accordingly, rather than just focusing on teaching any single technical outcome, the Information Technology Major strives to graduate versatile, broadly skilled individuals prepared to tackle a wide range of problems in a rapidly changing world of intensifying complexity. Since many of Franklin’s graduates are completing their degrees in order to advance their careers, it is reasonable to look at correlations between individual criteria and the summative “Employability” outcome of our Capstone Project. A statistical analysis of the data shows that the correlation between critical thinking and employability is significantly the strongest. While select technical skills are important, the largest single contributor to employability is not the technical content of the major, but rather the ability of students to think, reason, and communicate critically about the technical content.

Professional Memberships

ACM Special Interest Group for Computer Science Education (SIGCSE)
2003 - Present
Scope of Organization: International

Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
2003 - Present
Scope of Organization: International