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A.S. Accounting

A.S. Accounting Program Information

Available onsite at Franklin University , online at Franklin University .

The accounting profession provides essential qualitative and quantitative information to decision-makers, managers, investors, creditors, government regulators and other key players in the global economy. Accountants develop budgets, analyze and record financial transactions, summarize financial data in statements and reports, and develop systems to verify and control financial transactions.

The Accounting major has a curriculum designed around financial reporting and analysis, managerial accounting and cost management, tax accounting, auditing and accounting ethics, and financial management.

Graduates of the B.S. Accounting program will have the educational background needed to pursue professional certification (e.g., Certified Public Accountant, Certified Management Accountant, or Certified Internal Auditor). These designations are achieved through additional study beyond that required for the Bachelor of Science degree, and successful passage of rigorous examinations. Qualified students are encouraged to pursue opportunities for training and work experience through internships at certified public accounting firms, and in private industry and government.

The University Accounting faculty members are active in the accounting profession. Most work or have worked in public accounting, industry or government. The faculty believes that a thorough exposure to the diversity of the accounting field is essential for an understanding of the discipline's principles and theory. Many accountants avail themselves of professional development and growth opportunities, and students may do the same through the following organizations and associations: . American Institute of CPAs (AICPA) . The Ohio Society of CPAs (OSCPA) . American Accounting Association (AAA) . Financial Executives International (FEI) . Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE) . The Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA) . Information Systems Audit and Control Association (ISACA) . National Association of Black Accountants, Inc. (NABA) . National Association of Tax Professionals, Ohio Chapter (NATP) . Institute of Management Accountants (IMA) . Association of Government Accountants (AGA)

Curriculum & Course Descriptions

64 Semester Hours
Fundamental General Education Core (24 hours)
English Composition (3 hours)

Choose a minimum of 3 semester hours from:

ENG 120 - College Writing (4)
In this course, students acquire the writing competence necessary for conducting and presenting research. A variety of assignments, beginning with personal reflections, build upon one another, as students develop ideas that respond to, critique, and synthesize the positions of others. Students systematize and organize knowledge in ways that will help them in all of their courses. The course also emphasizes the elements of good writing style, appropriate grammar and mechanics, clarity of language, and logical and cohesive development. It culminates in submission of a documented research paper.

*If the course does not have a research paper component, ENG 130 Research Paper, two semester credits, is also required.

Mathematics (3 hours)
MATH 215 - Statistical Concepts (4)
This course introduces the student to statistics with business applications. The course covers both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics included are: measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion; graphical displays of data; linear regression; basic probability concepts; binomial and normal probability distributions; confidence intervals; and hypothesis testing. These topics will be covered using a basic knowledge of algebra and Microsoft Excel. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.

Choose either MATH 140 Introduction to Quantitative Reasoning or MATH 150 Fundamental Algebra as the prerequisite. Course can count as a University Elective.

 

Sciences (6 hours)

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

SCIE 210 - Understanding Science: Principles, Practice, & Theory (2)
Understanding Science: Principles, Practice & Theory is a two credit hour course that introduces students to the major themes, processes, and methods common to all scientific disciplines. Students will develop critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate all kinds of phenomena, scientific, pseudoscientific, and other. The focus is on the nature of science so students will develop an understanding of how science works and develop an appreciation for the process by which we gain scientific knowledge.
SCIE 211 - Introduction to Scientific Analysis & Reasoning (4)
Introduction to Scientific Analysis and Reasoning is a four credit hour course consisting of three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of laboratory. This course is an introduction to critical thinking on statistical and scientific claims. The student will develop the critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate popular sources of (mis)information and to better understand and evaluate all sorts of scientific claims and arguments. The focus of the course is on students developing thoughtful and critical use of scientific information and research to be able to separate truth from deception and make decisions that affect their personal lives and roles as informed and engaged citizens.

*Two science courses, with one having a laboratory component.

Social and Behavioral Sciences (6 hours)
ECON 220 - Introduction to Macroeconomics (4)
An introduction to economic theory involving the basic underlying causes and principles of the operation of an economic system. Emphasis is placed on studying the economy as a whole. Issues of inflation, unemployment, taxation, business cycles and growth are discussed in the context of the global economic system.

Also choose an additional course from Anthropology, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology.  Must select at least two different disciplines to meet requirements.

Arts and Humanities (6 hours)
HUMN 210 - Intro to Logic & Critical Thinking Skill (2)
The goal of this course is to help you improve as a critical, logical thinker. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. You will discover how to apply these valuable skills to your studies and everyday life, learning how to overcome obstacles to critical thinking, and how to avoid being deceived by means of misleading reasoning.

Also select another course from the Humanities discipline.  A minimum of 6 semester hours of Arts & Humanities coursework is required.

Additional General Education Requirements (12 hours)
PF 106 - Introduction to Spreadsheets (1)
This course focuses on using spreadsheets to solve business applications.
OR PF 116 - Computer Applications (3)
A course designed to acquaint students with the computer and its capabilities as they relate to business situations. Students will learn computer basics and how to use the computer for various applications including word processing, spreadsheets, internet usage, and presentation software.
PF 108 - Introduction to Databases (1)
This course focuses on using databases to solve business applications.
PF 321 - Learning Strategies (2)
This course prepares students to be successful lifelong learners both academically and in their chosen careers. Franklin courses require a high level of self-directed learning and focus on skills required in the workplace and the classroom that are easily transferable between the two environments. The course includes strategies for advancing communication skills, including the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments. The assignments and activities in the course are created to closely simulate teamwork found in the workplace.
COMM 150 - Interpersonal Communication (4)
By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
OR SPCH 100 - Speech Communication (4)
This public-speaking course emphasizes the fundamentals of extemporaneous speaking. Skill-building activities and assignments focus on research, organization, reasoning, style and delivery of presentations as well as listening and audience engagement.

General Education Electives (4)

Business Core (8 hours)
ACCT 215 - Financial Accounting (4)
An introduction to accounting emphasizing how general purpose financial statements communicate information about the business corporation's performance and position for users external to management. Approximately one third of the course emphasizes how the accountant processes and presents the information and includes exposure to recording transactions, adjusting balances and preparing financial statements for service and merchandise firms according to established rules and procedures. The balance of the course examines major elements of the statements such as cash, receivables, inventory, long-lived assets, depreciation, payroll, bonds, and other liabilities and stocks. Concepts of this course are applied to Managerial Accounting (ACCT 225). Students are advised to avoid any time lapse between these courses.
ACCT 225 - Managerial Accounting (4)
The study of management accounting for internal reporting and decision-making. The course introduces a business-management approach to the development and use of accounting information. Major topics include cost behavior, cost analysis, profit planning and control measures. Accounting for decentralized operations, capital budgeting decisions, and ethical challenges in managerial accounting are also covered.
Major Area (12 hours)
ACCT 310 - Intermediate Accounting I (4)
The first of two in-depth financial accounting courses. Theory, the conceptual framework, development of generally accepted accounting principles, and applications are stressed. Topics include the income statement, the statement of cash flows and the balance sheet, specifically asset accounts.
ACCT 320 - Intermediate Accounting II (4)
The second of two in-depth financial accounting courses. Theory, concepts and applications are stressed. Topics include time value of money, current and non-current liabilities, leases, deferred taxes, retirement benefits, stockholders, equity, earning per share, accounting changes and errors, and statement of cash flows.
ACCT 390 - Federal Income Tax I (4)
An introduction to the federal income tax structure with emphasis on the individual taxpayer, including employee, sole proprietor and investor. This course also provides exposure to basic concepts that apply equally, or with slight modification, to taxpayers other than individuals. Major topics include filing status, exemptions, excludable and includable income, business and non-business deductions, disallowances, technical tax research, and computer problem applications.
Major Electives (4 hours)

Select 4 hours from:

ACCT 330 - Cost Management (4)
This course is an in-depth study of cost accounting focusing on its role in internal reporting and the resulting decision-making processes. Students will evaluate the foundation, ethics and basic costing systems employed in the management accounting profession; analyze budgeting, cost behavior, pricing and profitability concepts and principles; determine how cost allocations, product quality, and investment decisions are applied by management accountants; determine how current trends in various industries impact cost accounting; and demonstrate knowledge that is in accordance with the educational requirements for the Certified Management Accountant (CMA) exam.
ACCT 341 - Fraud Examination (4)
This course provides an overview of the behavioral research associated with occupational fraud and the methodology of fraud examination (i.e., obtaining documentary evidence, interviewing witnesses and potential suspects, writing investigative reports, testifying to findings, and forensic document examination). The majority of the course is focused on detecting the most common types of occupational fraud, determining how each type of fraud is committed, and implementing prevention strategies.
ACCT 360 - Government & Not for Profit Accounting (4)
This course is designed to provide a framework for understanding the special accounting and reporting requirements of nonprofit organizations. The emphasis is on reporting concepts and budgeting principles for governmental and nonprofit economic entities.
ACCT 420 - Federal Income Tax II (4)
Analysis of the income tax consequences of the formation, operation and liquidation of C-corporations, S-corporations, partnerships, estates and trusts including the treatment of distributions by these entities and tax planning considerations. Also examined is the tax effect of property transfers by gift or death. Technical tax research and tax memo documentation also required.
ACCT 425 - Accounting Information Systems (4)
This course creates a framework for accounting information systems by combining knowledge about business as it relates to information systems, information technology, and accounting. Students will examine the REA enterprise ontology as it relates to databases which can be used to store and retrieve information for decision-making within an organization. Students learn that in the competitive organizations of today, and tomorrow, accountants cannot simply prepare and report information; they must take a more active role in understanding and creating systems and processes that impact the organization's bottom line. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
ACCT 470 - Auditing (4)
A study of the planning, evidence gathering, internal control review, sampling, and application of procedures used to audit assets, liabilities, equity and related income statement accounts of a profit-oriented enterprise. Includes an evaluation of the audit profession including professional standards, ethics and liability of CPAs. Also includes a student-prepared audit case for hands-on application of audit procedures. The reporting requirements for compilation and review services and a thorough study of the types of audit opinions will also be studied. In addition, an audit research paper is required.
ENTR 395 - Foundations of Entrepreneurship (4)
Foundations of Entrepreneurship is an introductory course that examines the theory, practice, and tools of entrepreneurship. Various entrepreneurship structures and how such structures result in different unique pathways to success are explored. Students will focus on the importance of developing an entrepreneurial mindset as they assess their individual values and determine their affinity for entrepreneurial thinking, while also reviewing the risks and rewards of entrepreneurial businesses in the context of their chosen entrepreneurial philosophy. Finally, students will identify and evaluate opportunities for new ventures, and consider a strategic approach for successful business plan development.
University Electives (4 hours)

Any undergraduate courses offered by the University except developmental education courses.

Additional Requirements

All students are required to pass College Writing (ENG 120), and either Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121), Learning Strategies (PF 321) or University Seminar (UNI 199) prior to enrolling in any course at the 200 level or above. Students who enroll at Franklin with 30 or fewer hours of transfer credit are required to pass PF 121 Basic Learning Strategies in place of PF 321 Learning Strategies. All Urbana University students will enroll in UNI 199 University Seminar.  Interpersonal Communication (COMM 150) or Speech Communication (SPCH 100) must be taken prior to enrolling in any course at the 300 level or above. Students must also meet the University algebra competency requirement.