Skip to main content
A.S. Insurance

Help organizations and individuals mitigate risk with an associate degree in insurance

More than a promise to help when things go wrong, insurance is a strategic plan for the unexpected. For individuals already working in the insurance field, Franklin’s A.S. Insurance is an investment that increases your career options to include underwriting, investigating and adjusting claims, as well as managing products within the market. With your associate degree in hand, you’ll boast strong analytical skills informed by the fundamentals of law, economics and finance that will enable you to analyze and manage organizational risk and use accepted risk-management methodologies to minimize loss. 

Program not available in

On Site

Take the next step toward your degree!

Request free program information or submit your online application.

A Well-Rounded Curriculum

Expand your skillset with a balance of relevant courses.

Real-World Practitioners

Learn from experienced business and insurance professionals.

100% Online Classes

Earn your degree around your schedule.

Program Overview

Evaluate and manage organizational and personal risk

Whether you work for yourself, an agency or a business organization, our insurance curriculum teaches you the most important thing today’s insurance professionals need to know -- how to evaluate and manage risk to minimize exposure to loss.

From personal financial planning to insurance products to insurance-related regulatory practices, our relevant coursework helps prepare you for a variety of insurance careers, including insurance adjuster, agent and product manager.

With Franklin’s A.S. Insurance degree program, you’ll learn to identify and manage risk and how various products and methods, including insurance, can be used to manage the non speculative risks of individuals and businesses. You’ll analyze property and liability contracts - to understand how the industry develops, manages, markets and underwrites contracts within a complex economic and regulatory environment. 

You’ll also learn interviewing techniques and strategies useful in interviewing and investigations in the insurance field. These techniques and strategies include interpreting the verbal and nonverbal cues of an interviewee, as well as planning, conducting, and documenting the findings from investigative interviews.

Plus, our associate in insurance degree program is 100 percent online, so you can earn your degree and still have a life, too. And, if you decide to pursue your bachelor’s degree at Franklin, our associate in insurance degree program gives you a solid foundation of theoretical and real-world knowledge to ready you for a seamless transfer to Franklin’s B.S. Risk Management & Insurance degree program.

Read more >

Curriculum & Course Descriptions

60 Semester Hours
Fundamental General Education Core (36 hours)
ENG 120 - College Writing (4)
In this course, students acquire the writing competence necessary for conducting and presenting research. A variety of assignments, beginning with personal reflections, build upon one another, as students develop ideas that respond to, critique, and synthesize the positions of others. Students systematize and organize knowledge in ways that will help them in all of their courses. The course also emphasizes the elements of good writing style, appropriate grammar and mechanics, clarity of language, and logical and cohesive development. It culminates in submission of a documented research paper.
MATH 160 - College Algebra (4)
This course is designed to prepare students for Applied Calculus and Discrete Mathematics and to provide the mathematical background needed for the analytic reasoning used in other courses. Topics include functions and their graphs, including exponential and logarithmic functions; complex numbers; systems of equations and inequalities; matrices; basic principles of counting and probability; and other selected topics.
OR MATH 215 - Statistical Concepts (4)
This course introduces the student to statistics with business applications. The course covers both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics included are: measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion; graphical displays of data; linear regression; basic probability concepts; binomial and normal probability distributions; confidence intervals; and hypothesis testing. These topics will be covered using a basic knowledge of algebra and Microsoft Excel. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.

*Choose either MATH 140 Introduction to Quantitative Reasoning (MATH 215)  or MATH 150 Fundamental Algebra (MATH 160) as the prerequisite. Course can count as a University elective.

Science: Choose from the Science discipline, one with a lab (6) 

ECON 220 - Introduction to Macroeconomics (4)
An introduction to economic theory involving the basic underlying causes and principles of the operation of an economic system. Emphasis is placed on studying the economy as a whole. Issues of inflation, unemployment, taxation, business cycles and growth are discussed in the context of the global economic system.

Social and behavioral sciences: Choose from the Social and Behavioral Sciences discipline (2) 

HUMN 211 - Intro to Ethical Analysis & Reasoning (2)
The goal of this course is to help you improve your ethical analysis and reasoning skills. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing ethical arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. In this course, you will discover how to apply the following questions to your job and everyday life. Why do we need ethics if we have laws to govern our behavior' Does the majority view determine what is ethical and what is not' Are feelings, desires, and preferences reliable ethical guides' Is it ever appropriate to criticize another individual's (or culture's) ethical judgment' Are people always responsible for their actions' Do human beings have a natural tendency to good, a natural tendency to evil' both' neither' Is there a single moral code that is binding on all people, at all times, and in all places'
HUMN Elective (4)
PF 121 - Basic Learning Strategies (2)
This course introduces students to the Franklin University community and provides strategies for successful transition to and participation in that community. Topics include University resources and procedures, strategies for advancing communication skills, the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments, and the development of an academic and career plan.
OR PF 321 - Learning Strategies (2)
This course prepares students to be successful lifelong learners both academically and in their chosen careers. Franklin courses require a high level of self-directed learning and focus on skills required in the workplace and the classroom that are easily transferable between the two environments. The course includes strategies for advancing communication skills, including the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments. The assignments and activities in the course are created to closely simulate teamwork found in the workplace.
COMM 150 - Interpersonal Communication (4)
By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
OR SPCH 100 - Speech Communication (4)
This public-speaking course emphasizes the fundamentals of extemporaneous speaking. Skill-building activities and assignments focus on research, organization, reasoning, style and delivery of presentations as well as listening and audience engagement.
COMP 106 - Introduction to Spreadsheets (1)
This course focuses on using spreadsheets to solve business applications.
COMP 108 - Introduction to Databases (1)
This course focuses on using databases to solve business applications.

General Education Electives (2) 

Major Area (24 hours)
ACCT 215 - Financial Accounting (4)
An introduction to accounting emphasizing how general purpose financial statements communicate information about the business corporation's performance and position for users external to management. Approximately one third of the course emphasizes how the accountant processes and presents the information and includes exposure to recording transactions, adjusting balances and preparing financial statements for service and merchandise firms according to established rules and procedures. The balance of the course examines major elements of the statements such as cash, receivables, inventory, long-lived assets, depreciation, payroll, bonds, and other liabilities and stocks. Concepts of this course are applied to Managerial Accounting (ACCT 225). Students are advised to avoid any time lapse between these courses.
BSAD 110 - Business Principles (4)
An introductory business course that helps students learn business terminology and provides preliminary study into the areas of economics, global business, ethics, business ownership, business management, human resource management, marketing, accounting and finance.
FPLN 300 - Principles of Financial Planning (4)
An introduction to personal financial planning. Topics include the financial planning process, money management and investments, insurance needs, income tax planning, retirement planning and estate planning. Cases are used to illustrate important planning concepts, techniques and issues.
RMI 300 - Principles of Risk Management & Insurance (4)
This course introduces students to the general concepts of risk identification and management, as well as how various products and methods, including insurance, can be used to manage the non-speculative risks of individuals and businesses. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing various types of insurance products, including life, health, property, and liability insurance contracts, and how the insurance industry develops, manages, markets, and underwrites such contracts in a complex economic and regulatory environment.
RMI 220 - Interviewing Techniques for Insurance Investigations (4)
This course provides an overview of techniques and strategies useful in interviewing and investifations in the insurance field. These techniques and strategies include interpreting the verbal and nonverbal cues of an interviewee, as well as planning, conducting, and documenting the findings from investigative interviews.
BSAD 220 - Business Law (4)
A study of the everyday legal problems encountered in business with emphasis on the areas of legal procedure, contracts, agency, employment law, business organizations and torts, with cases relating to these and other areas.
OR ECON 210 - Introduction to Microeconomics (4)
An introduction to economic theory involving the examination of how decision making by firms and individuals is shaped by economic forces. Emphasis is placed on demand, supply, market equilibrium analysis, and basic market structure models. The invisible hand as the driving force for economic decisions as well as market externalities are discussed. The class concentrates on providing a balanced approach to studying economic agents' behavior and the global implications and outcomes.
Additional Requirements

All students are required to pass College Writing (ENG 120), and either Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121), Learning Strategies (PF 321) or University Seminar (UNI 199) prior to enrolling in any course at the 200 level or above. Students who enroll at Franklin with 30 or fewer hours of transfer credit are required to pass PF 121 Basic Learning Strategies in place of PF 321 Learning Strategies. All Urbana University students will enroll in UNI 199 University Seminar.  Interpersonal Communication (COMM 150) or Speech Communication (SPCH 100) must be taken prior to enrolling in any course at the 300 level or above. Students must also meet the University algebra competency requirement.

Program Details

Request Free Information!

Want to learn more about Franklin University? Complete the simple form - it just takes a minute!

  • Invest in yourself by finishing your degree.

  • Take classes online, on campus, or both.

  • Finish faster. Save more. Franklin fits your life.

  • Top employers hire Franklin grads to provide relevant industry knowledge.

Request Information

In submitting my contact information, I understand that I will receive phone calls, text messages and email about attending Franklin University. I may opt out of these communications at any time.

Your privacy is important to us. Privacy Policy

Career Opportunities

Property & Casualty Underwriter

Underwriters evaluate applications to determine if insurance coverage should be provided and under what terms, including coverage and premium amounts.
 

Claims Adjuster

Claims adjusters review and investigate losses, as well as evaluate and resolve claims through settlement or denial. 


 

Insurance Investigator Officer

Insurance investigator officers obtain evidence through surveillance and documentation such as recorded interviews, then evaluate the evidence and communicate results and recommendations to key stakeholders.
 

Back to College Blog