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Online Computer Science Degree Program

Online Computer Science Degrees - Computer Science Bachelor Degree Program OverviewProgram DetailsWhy Choose Franklin
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Computer Science - Bachelor of Science Degree

128 Semester Hours

Fundamental General Education Core (24 hours)

All courses must be at the 100 or 200 level

English Composition

Choose a minimum of 3 semester hours from:

  • WRIT 120 - COLLEGE WRITING (4)

    WRIT 120

    COLLEGE WRITING

    Course Description

    In this course, students acquire the writing competence necessary for conducting and presenting research. A variety of assignments, beginning with personal reflections, build upon one another, as students develop ideas that respond to, critique, and synthesize the positions of others. Students systematize and organize knowledge in ways that will help them in all of their courses. The course also e
Mathematics

Choose a minimum of three semester hours from:

  • MATH 160 - COLLEGE ALGEBRA (4)

    MATH 160

    COLLEGE ALGEBRA

    Course Description

    This course is designed to prepare students for Applied Calculus and Discrete Mathematics and to provide the mathematical background needed for the analytic reasoning used in other courses. Topics include functions and their graphs, including exponential and logarithmic functions; complex numbers; systems of equations and inequalities; matrices; basic principles of counting and probability; and ot
  • MATH 180 - APPLIED CALCULUS (4)

    MATH 180

    APPLIED CALCULUS

    Course Description

    This course is designed to meet the needs of the Computer Science Program. Topics include limits, the derivative, rules for differentiation, graphing strategy, optimization problems, differentials, implicit differentiation, related rates, exponential and logarithmic functions, antiderivatives, definite integrals, areas, and methods of integration. Applications are emphasized.
  • MATH 210 - FINITE MATHEMATICS (4)

    MATH 210

    FINITE MATHEMATICS

    Course Description

    This course includes such topics as matrices, solutions of simultaneous linear equations using matrix methods, graphic and simplex solutions to linear programming problems, set theory, counting problems (including permutations and combinations), probability theory (including Bayes' theorem), Markov chains, and the mathematics of finance. Game theory may be discussed if time permits. Applications i
  • MATH 215 - STATISTICAL CONCEPTS (4)

    MATH 215

    STATISTICAL CONCEPTS

    Course Description

    This course introduces the student to statistics with business applications. The course covers both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics included are: measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion; graphical displays of data; linear regression; basic probability concepts; binomial and normal probability distributions; confidence intervals; and hypothesis testing. These topics will
  • MATH 220 - BUSINESS CALCULUS (4)

    MATH 220

    BUSINESS CALCULUS

    Course Description

    This course may not be taken by students who previously received calculus credit. Topics include limits, the derivative, rules for differentiation, graphing strategy, optimization problems, differentials, implicit differentiation, related rates, exponential and logarithmic functions, antiderivatives, definite integrals, areas, and methods of integration. Applications in business, economics, and ma
Sciences

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

  • SCIE 112 - INTRO/HUMAN BIOLOGY (4)

    SCIE 112

    INTRO/HUMAN BIOLOGY

    Course Description

    SCIE 112 is a four credit hour lecture-based course designed to provide the student with a basic knowledge and understanding of human biology with an emphasis on the impact of science in everyday life. Topics include: chemistry of living things, cell structure and function, genetics and inheritance, cellular reproduction, and the basic anatomy and physiology of major organ systems in the human bod
  • SCIE 114 - EARTH SCIENCE (4)

    SCIE 114

    EARTH SCIENCE

    Course Description

    Earth Science is a four credit hour course that consists of three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of laboratory components. Earth Science is a survey course that provides an overview of geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy. Topics covered will focus on the materials that make up the Earth, the changes that occur both on the surface and in the interior of the Earth, and the
  • SCIE 131 - ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (4)

    SCIE 131

    ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

    Course Description

    Environmental Science is a four credit hour course that consists of three credit hour lecture and one credit hour laboratory components. Environmental Science is an introductory course that explores Earth's natural systems and how human activity affects the environment. Topics covered include food and agriculture, population dynamics, urbanization, resource use and depletion, pollution, environmen
  • SCIE 200 - SCIENCE AND SOCIETY (2)

    SCIE 200

    SCIENCE AND SOCIETY

    Course Description

    Science and Society is a two credit hour lecture based course that seeks to explore and understand the ways that science and technology shape the daily lives of humans. We will examine the nature of science and investigate the current controversies over issues in science and technology, so that informed choices among competing scientific, technological, and political and social priorities can be m
  • SCIE 210 - UNDERSTANDING SCIENCE: PRINCIPLES, PRACTICE, & THEORY (2)

    SCIE 210

    UNDERSTANDING SCIENCE: PRINCIPLES, PRACTICE, & THEORY

    Course Description

    Understanding Science: Principles, Practice & Theory is a two credit hour course that introduces students to the major themes, processes, and methods common to all scientific disciplines. Students will develop critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate all kinds of phenomena, scientific, pseudoscientific, and other. The focus is on the nature of science so students will develop an
  • SCIE 211 - INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC ANALYSIS & REASONING (4)

    SCIE 211

    INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC ANALYSIS & REASONING

    Course Description

    Introduction to Scientific Analysis and Reasoning is a four credit hour course consisting of three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of laboratory. This course is an introduction to critical thinking on statistical and scientific claims. The student will develop the critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate popular sources of (mis)information and to better understand and
Social and Behavioral Sciences

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

  • ANTH 215 - CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4)

    ANTH 215

    CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY

    Course Description

    This course exposes students to the principles, concepts, research methods, and applications of cultural anthropology. Students will be introduced to the wide range of variation in social and institutional arrangements found historically and cross-culturally. From language to gender roles, from bases of social stratification to causes and consequences of conformity, from the simpler life in foragi
  • ECON 210 - INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS (4)

    ECON 210

    INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS

    Course Description

    An introduction to economic theory involving the examination of how decision making by firms and individuals is shaped by economic forces. Emphasis is placed on demand, supply, market equilibrium analysis, and basic market structure models. The invisible hand as the driving force for economic decisions as well as market externalities are discussed. The class concentrates on providing a balanced ap
  • ECON 220 - INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS (4)

    ECON 220

    INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS

    Course Description

    An introduction to economic theory involving the basic underlying causes and principles of the operation of an economic system. Emphasis is placed on studying the economy as a whole. Issues of inflation, unemployment, taxation, business cycles and growth are discussed in the context of the global economic system.
  • PSYC 110 - GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY (4)

    PSYC 110

    GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY

    Course Description

    A survey of the various fields of study comprising modern scientific psychology. The course examines the theories, research findings, and applications in each of the major areas of psychology, with the goal of providing students with practice information they can apply to their personal and professional lives. The topic areas covered in the course include learning and memory, motivation and emotio
  • PSYC 204 - PRINCIPLES OF MOTIVATION (4)

    PSYC 204

    PRINCIPLES OF MOTIVATION

    Course Description

    This course is a systematic study of various theories and approaches to work motivation, with assessments of the research and practice evidence supporting their scientific validity and applicability to the work environment. Students will explore factors that contribute to motivation and strategies that today's manager can use to become a successful motivator.
  • SOCL 110 - INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (4)

    SOCL 110

    INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

    Course Description

    Sociology is the scientific study of group behavior - whether the groups are dyads, small groups, associations, bureaucracies, societies, publics, aggregates, social movements, or mobs, etc. This introductory course introduces the student to sociological principles and theoretical perspectives that facilitate understanding the norms, values, structure and process of the various types of groups int
  • PUAD 295 - AMERICAN GOVERNMENT IN ACTION (4)

    PUAD 295

    AMERICAN GOVERNMENT IN ACTION

    Course Description

    The course examines the American system of government and how government affects and interacts with individuals and organizations in society. Students learn how politics, law, and the structure and principles of American government impact citizens, public policy, and the administration of public and private organizations. Students apply fundamental political theories and administration law princip
Arts and Humanities

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

  • HUMN 210 - INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC & CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS (2)

    HUMN 210

    INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC & CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS

    Course Description

    The goal of this course is to help you improve as a critical, logical thinker. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. You will discover how to apply these valuable skills to your studies and everyday life, learning how to overcome obstacles to critical thinking, and how to avoid being deceived b
  • HUMN 211 - INTRO TO ETHICAL ANALYSIS AND REASONING (2)

    HUMN 211

    INTRO TO ETHICAL ANALYSIS AND REASONING

    Course Description

    The goal of this course is to help you improve your ethical analysis and reasoning skills. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing ethical arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. In this course, you will discover how to apply the following questions to your job and everyday life. Why do we need ethics if we have laws to govern our beha
  • HUMN 218 - WORLD RELIGIONS (4)

    HUMN 218

    WORLD RELIGIONS

    Course Description

    A comparative study of the founders, sacred writings, beliefs and practices of some of the major world religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Islam, Judaism and Christianity. This course enables the student to study and compare the leading religions of the world in light of their historical and cultural backgrounds. Students will be encouraged to explore faith traditions other than their own. Comm
  • HUMN 232 - INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE (4)

    HUMN 232

    INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE

    Course Description

    In this course, students will analyze works from the three major literary genres: poetry, drama, and fiction. Students will become familiar with standard vocabulary and approaches specific to the field of literary criticism and consider the importance of literature in contemporary society. The goal of this course is to encourage students to read for pleasure (engage with the text on an emotional l
  • HUMN 240 - POPULAR CULTURE (4)

    HUMN 240

    POPULAR CULTURE

    Course Description

    An introductory course that examines basic concepts in popular culture studies and the role popular arts and artifacts play in shaping cultural values. The course covers basic theories and approaches to topics like best sellers, popular music, popular art forms, cultural heroes from the sports and entertainment worlds and other popular phenomena.
  • HUMN 246 - FILM APPRECIATION (4)

    HUMN 246

    FILM APPRECIATION

    Course Description

    This course is an introduction to the art of film intended to enable students to become more knowledgeable, appreciative and critical viewers. The course covers the major areas of film: narrative, documentary, animated and experimental. While some film history is covered, this course emphasizes understanding key elements in the filmmaking process: scripting, filming, editing, acting, directing, pr
Learn More About General Education

Additional General Education Requirements (26 hours)

  • HUMN 305 - GLOBAL ISSUES (4)

    HUMN 305

    GLOBAL ISSUES

    Course Description

    This course provides students with a coherent sense of the past and present human societies drawn from five cultural areas: Asia, Africa, Europe, North America and South America. It also reviews the diversity of traditions that have formed the world and continue to interact in it today. Through the synthesis of connections, influences and parallels among cultures, students will gain an understandi
  • MATH 180 - APPLIED CALCULUS (4)

    MATH 180

    APPLIED CALCULUS

    Course Description

    This course is designed to meet the needs of the Computer Science Program. Topics include limits, the derivative, rules for differentiation, graphing strategy, optimization problems, differentials, implicit differentiation, related rates, exponential and logarithmic functions, antiderivatives, definite integrals, areas, and methods of integration. Applications are emphasized.
  • MATH 380 - PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS (4)

    MATH 380

    PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS

    Course Description

    This course is designed to introduce probability theory, statistical inference, analysis of variance and regression techniques to students majoring in Computer Science. Topics include sets and probability, random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions, estimation theory, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, and analysis of variance.
  • PF 321 - LEARNING STRATEGIES (2)

    PF 321

    LEARNING STRATEGIES

    Course Description

    This course prepares students to be successful lifelong learners both academically and in their chosen careers. Franklin courses require a high level of self-directed learning and focus on skills required in the workplace and the classroom that are easily transferable between the two environments. The course includes strategies for advancing communication skills, including the use of electronic to
  • SPCH 100 - SPEECH COMMUNICATION (4)

    SPCH 100

    SPEECH COMMUNICATION

    Course Description

    A basic public speaking course intended to improve the student's ability to think critically and to communicate orally. Theory and practice are provided in various speaking situations. Each student is required to speak before an audience, but class work also involves reading, gathering and organizing information, writing and listening.

    OR COMM 150 - INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION (4)

    COMM 150

    INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION

    Course Description

    By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking.
  • WRIT 220 - RESEARCH & WRITING FOR ACADEMIC & PROFESSIONAL AUDIENCES (4)

    WRIT 220

    RESEARCH & WRITING FOR ACADEMIC & PROFESSIONAL AUDIENCES

    Course Description

    This is an intermediate course focusing on the composition of research papers. Students in this course prepare to be active participants in professional discourse communities by examining and practicing the writing conventions associated with their own fields of study and work. By calling attention to the conventions of disciplinary writing, the course also prepares students for upper-division col

    OR WRIT 320 - BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WRITING (4)

    WRIT 320

    BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WRITING

    Course Description

    This is an advanced composition course for juniors and seniors which focuses on business, technical and professional writing. Skills taught include audience analysis; research methods; questionnaire, interview and survey techniques; letters; data collection, interpretation and documentation; graphic illustration; and composition of reports in special formats. Instruction and practice are provided
  • Social & Behavioral Science Electives (4)

University Electives (6 hours)

  • Any course offered by the University except development education courses.

Major Area (68 hours)

  • COMP 111 - INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE & OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING (4)

    COMP 111

    INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE & OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING

    Course Description

    This course provides an introduction to software construction using an object-oriented approach. The student learns and reflects on problem analysis, object-oriented design, implementation, and testing. To support the concepts and principles of software construction, the student will design, code, test, debug, and document programs using the Java programming language. Basic data types, control str
  • COMP 121 - OBJECT-ORIENTED DATA STRUCTURES & ALGORITHMS I (4)

    COMP 121

    OBJECT-ORIENTED DATA STRUCTURES & ALGORITHMS I

    Course Description

    This course continues the object-oriented approach to software construction. The student learns and reflects on advanced object-oriented techniques, algorithm efficiency, class hierarchies, and data structures. To support the concepts and principles of software construction, the student will design, code, test, debug, and document programs using the Java programming language. Design principles, I/
  • COMP 201 - PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER ORGANIZATION (2)

    COMP 201

    PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER ORGANIZATION

    Course Description

    This course is one of four courses that holistically explore the structure of computational systems. This course deals with the nature of computer hardware. The course will cover the structure of current computer systems at the level of functional organization, representation of data and programs, the design of the memory hierarchy, and the design of the I/O system. The course will introduce basic
  • COMP 204 - PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER NETWORKS (2)

    COMP 204

    PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER NETWORKS

    Course Description

    This course serves as an introduction to the function, design, administration, and implementation of computer networks. Topics include network infrastructure, architecture, protocols, applications, and the OSI networking model.
  • COMP 215 - PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES: PRNCPLS/PRACTICE (4)

    COMP 215

    PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES: PRNCPLS/PRACTICE

    Course Description

    This course conveys a high-level vision of programming language theory. It begins with the principles and methodologies of computer programming language such as syntax, semantics, grammar, and parsing. An assortment of programming paradigms is introduced to cover both the traditional imperative and some alternative approaches to program development. These paradigms are presented by the rudiments o
  • COMP 281 - DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (4)

    COMP 281

    DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    Course Description

    This course covers fundamental concepts necessary for the design, use, implementation and administration of database systems. The course will stress the fundamentals of database modeling and design, the languages and facilities provided by database management systems, and some techniques for implementing and administering database systems.
  • COMP 294 - COMPUTER SCIENCE PRACTICUM I (2)

    COMP 294

    COMPUTER SCIENCE PRACTICUM I

    Course Description

    This is the first practicum course in the Computer Science program. It provides experience in an on-going software development project. A student at this level will be given an assignment in a team similar to that of a new hire in industry. The software development project will require the student to apply industry best practices in completing an assignment for the project.
  • COMP 311 - OBJECT-ORIENTED DATA STRUCTURES & ALGORITHMS II (4)

    COMP 311

    OBJECT-ORIENTED DATA STRUCTURES & ALGORITHMS II

    Course Description

    This course is the third of four courses using the object-oriented approach to software construction. The student learns and reflects on non-linear data structures, recursive algorithms, algorithm efficiency, and design patterns. To support the concepts and principles of software construction, the student will design, code, test, debug, and document programs using the Java programming language. Im
  • COMP 321 - APPLICATION SERVER PROGRAMMING (4)

    COMP 321

    APPLICATION SERVER PROGRAMMING

    Course Description

    This course provides an introduction to server-based programming using an object-oriented approach. The student learns and reflects on two- and three-tier software architectures, separation of responsibility, design patterns, and web frameworks. To support the concepts and principles of server-based software construction, the student will design, code, test, debug, and document programs using the
  • COMP 323 - FUNDAMENTALS OF OPERATING SYSTEMS (4)

    COMP 323

    FUNDAMENTALS OF OPERATING SYSTEMS

    Course Description

    This course introduces the major topics of operating systems such as file systems, IO, virtual memory, and scheduling. The application of operating systems is shown in mobile and personal devices as well as in servers and large scale processing systems. In addition, the student is given an introduction to multi-process and threaded applications and the resultant need to apply synchronization to av
  • COMP 325 - HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION (4)

    COMP 325

    HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION

    Course Description

    This course covers a broad range of important topics within human computer interaction (HCI) and its implications for the design of interactive systems. By understanding the user?s viewpoint and technology?s effect on people, we can better plan for the selection, design, implementation, and use of technology so that the effects are positive rather than negative. The focus is on the design of inter
  • COMP 394 - COMPUTER SCIENCE PRACTICUM II (2)

    COMP 394

    COMPUTER SCIENCE PRACTICUM II

    Course Description

    This is the second practicum course in the Computer Science program. It provides experience in an on-going software development project. A student at this level will be given an assignment in a team similar to that of an experienced team member or as a team leader in industry. The software development project will require the student to apply industry best practices in completing an assignment for
  • COMP 461 - ENTERPRISE SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE (4)

    COMP 461

    ENTERPRISE SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE

    Course Description

    This course reinforces and extends client-server programming concepts to enterprise applications. It introduces Enterprise Java Bean technologies such as JNDI, EJBs and EJB Containers. It explores the current use of XML and XSLT for data representation and communication. The course studies the application of patterns in the design of enterprise architectures. Finally, the course introduces emergin
  • COMP 486 - OBJECT-ORIENTED ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (4)

    COMP 486

    OBJECT-ORIENTED ANALYSIS AND DESIGN

    Course Description

    This course studies the process of designing software systems both from the view of process and from the view of requirements, analysis and the synthesis of a viable software design. It builds on the concepts from the programming sequence to examine the aspects of good design practice.
  • COMP 495 - COMPUTER SCIENCE PRACTICUM III/CAPSTONE (4)

    COMP 495

    COMPUTER SCIENCE PRACTICUM III/CAPSTONE

    Course Description

    This is the third practicum course in the Computer Science program. It, like the first two practicum experiences, is an on-going software development project. A student at this level will be given an assignment at the most senior level, requiring planning and overall coordination tasks. Design tasks of extreme complication are also candidates for these students. In addition to the project work, th
  • ISEC 300 - PRINCIPLES OF INFORMATION SECURITY (4)

    ISEC 300

    PRINCIPLES OF INFORMATION SECURITY

    Course Description

    In a highly connected, data intensive, and cost-focused business environment, the practice of information security not a business advantage; it is a customer requirement. Viruses, malware, trojans, denial of service attacks, phishing, and even Wiki leaks have become headline news. Failure to insure the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of data costs companies millions, if not billions o
  • MATH 170 - DISCRETE MATHEMATICS (4)

    MATH 170

    DISCRETE MATHEMATICS

    Course Description

    This course introduces students to fundamental algebraic, logical and combinational concepts in mathematics that are needed in upper division computer science courses. Topics include logic; sets, mappings, and relations; elementary counting principles; proof techniques with emphasis on mathematical induction; graphs and directed graphs; Boolean algebras; recursion; and applications to computer sci
  • MIS 310 - INFORMATION SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE & TECHNOLOGY (4)

    MIS 310

    INFORMATION SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE & TECHNOLOGY

    Course Description

    This course provides a conceptual survey of general systems theory followed by a conceptual and technological survey of the structure of distributed information systems architectures, operating systems, network operating systems, peripheral technology and user interfaces. Interoperability between these architectural components will be explored and current technology and trends in each architectura
  • MIS 320 - TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION (4)

    MIS 320

    TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION

    Course Description

    This course will prepare students for the bi-directional technical communication demands specific to computer and information systems. Topics include technical research methods and approaches, critical analysis of technical documents, synthesis of data, information and knowledge gained through research and critical analysis, creation of accurate technical documents, and effective delivery of techn

Major Electives (4 hours)

Students can complete the required 4 credit hours for the major area elective requirement by selecting one of the following options:

Additional Requirements

  • All students are required to pass College Writing (WRIT 120), either Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121) or Learning Strategies (PF 321) and either Speech Communication (SPCH 100) or Interpersonal Communication (COMM 150) prior to enrolling in any other course at the 200 level or above. Either PF 121 or PF 321 must be taken prior to the first BLF course, or it may be taken concurrently with the first 15-week BLF course. Students who enroll at Franklin with 30 or fewer hours of transfer credit are required to pass Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121) in place of Learning Strategies (PF 321). Students must also meet the University algebra competency requirement.

Please see the Academic Bulletin for the complete list of degree and residency requirements.

Additional Curriculum

Computer Science - Subsequent Bachelor of Science Degree

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Looking to earn an additional bachelor’s degree? A subsequent degree is specifically designed for students who have already completed a bachelor's degree or higher.

Computer Science - Associate of Science Degree

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Begin building your educational foundation with a curriculum that has a broad base in general education while touching upon a specific area of study.

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