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Operations & Supply Chain Management Program

Online Supply Chain Management Degree - Logistics Degree Online Program OverviewProgram DetailsWhy Choose Franklin
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Operations & Supply Chain Management - Bachelor of Science Degree

126 Semester Hours

Fundamental General Education Core (24 hours)

English Composition

Choose a minimum of 3 semester hours from:

  • WRIT 120 - COLLEGE WRITING (4)

    WRIT 120

    COLLEGE WRITING

    Course Description

    In this course, students acquire the writing competence necessary for conducting and presenting research. A variety of assignments, beginning with personal reflections, build upon one another, as students develop ideas that respond to, critique, and synthesize the positions of others. Students systematize and organize knowledge in ways that will help them in all of their courses. The course also emphasizes the elements of good writing style, appropriate grammar and mechanics, clarity of language, and logical and cohesive development. It culminates in submission of a documented research paper.
Mathematics

Choose a minimum of three semester hours from:

  • MATH 215 - STATISTICAL CONCEPTS (4)

    MATH 215

    STATISTICAL CONCEPTS

    Course Description

    This course introduces the student to statistics with business applications. The course covers both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics included are: measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion; graphical displays of data; linear regression; basic probability concepts; binomial and normal probability distributions; confidence intervals; and hypothesis testing. These topics will be covered using a basic knowledge of algebra and Microsoft Excel.
    1
1 Choose either MATH 115 Introduction to Quantitative Reasoning or MATH 150 Fundamental Algebra as the prerequisite. Both courses can count as a general education or University elective.
Sciences

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

  • SCIE 210 - UNDERSTANDING SCIENCE: PRINCIPLES, PRACTICE, & THEORY (2)

    SCIE 210

    UNDERSTANDING SCIENCE: PRINCIPLES, PRACTICE, & THEORY

    Course Description

    Understanding Science: Principles, Practice & Theory is a two credit hour course that introduces students to the major themes, processes, and methods common to all scientific disciplines. Students will develop critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate all kinds of phenomena, scientific, pseudoscientific, and other. The focus is on the nature of science so students will develop an understanding of how science works and develop an appreciation for the process by which we gain scientific knowledge.
  • SCIE 211 - INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC ANALYSIS & REASONING (4)

    SCIE 211

    INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC ANALYSIS & REASONING

    Course Description

    Introduction to Scientific Analysis and Reasoning is a four credit hour course consisting of three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of laboratory. This course is an introduction to critical thinking on statistical and scientific claims. The student will develop the critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate popular sources of (mis)information and to better understand and evaluate all sorts of scientific claims and arguments. The focus of the course is on students developing thoughtful and critical use of scientific information and research to be able to separate truth from deception and make decisions that affect their personal lives and roles as informed and engaged citizens.
Social and Behavioral Sciences

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

  • ECON 220 - INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS (4)

    ECON 220

    INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS

    Course Description

    An introduction to economic theory involving the basic underlying causes and principles of the operation of an economic system. Emphasis is placed on studying the economy as a whole. Issues of inflation, unemployment, taxation, business cycles and growth are discussed in the context of the global economic system.
  • Choose an additional course from the Anthropology, Psychology, or Sociology discipline, or PUAD 295 American Government in Action.
Arts and Humanities

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

  • HUMN 211 - INTRO TO ETHICAL ANALYSIS AND REASONING (2)

    HUMN 211

    INTRO TO ETHICAL ANALYSIS AND REASONING

    Course Description

    The goal of this course is to help you improve your ethical analysis and reasoning skills. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing ethical arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. In this course, you will discover how to apply the following questions to your job and everyday life. Why do we need ethics if we have laws to govern our behavior' Does the majority view determine what is ethical and what is not' Are feelings, desires, and preferences reliable ethical guides' Is it ever appropriate to criticize another individual's (or culture's) ethical judgment' Are people always responsible for their actions' Do human beings have a natural tendency to good, a natural tendency to evil' both' neither' Is there a single moral code that is binding on all people, at all times, and in all places'
  • Choose additional coursework from the Humanities discipline.
Learn More About General Education

Additional General Education Requirements (12 hours)

  • COMP 106 - INTRODUCTION TO SPREADSHEETS (1)

    COMP 106

    INTRODUCTION TO SPREADSHEETS

    Course Description

    This course focuses on using spreadsheets to solve business applications.
  • COMP 108 - INTRODUCTION TO DATABASES (1)

    COMP 108

    INTRODUCTION TO DATABASES

    Course Description

    This course focuses on using databases to solve business applications.
  • PF 321 - LEARNING STRATEGIES (2)

    PF 321

    LEARNING STRATEGIES

    Course Description

    This course prepares students to be successful lifelong learners both academically and in their chosen careers. Franklin courses require a high level of self-directed learning and focus on skills required in the workplace and the classroom that are easily transferable between the two environments. The course includes strategies for advancing communication skills, including the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments. The assignments and activities in the course are created to closely simulate teamwork found in the workplace.
  • SPCH 100 - SPEECH COMMUNICATION (4)

    SPCH 100

    SPEECH COMMUNICATION

    Course Description

    A basic public speaking course intended to improve the student's ability to think critically and to communicate orally. Theory and practice are provided in various speaking situations. Each student is required to speak before an audience, but class work also involves reading, gathering and organizing information, writing and listening.

    OR COMM 150 - INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION (4)

    COMM 150

    INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION

    Course Description

    By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking.
  • General Education Electives (4)

Business Core (28 hours)

  • ACCT 215 - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (4)

    ACCT 215

    FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

    Course Description

    An introduction to accounting emphasizing how general purpose financial statements communicate information about the business corporation's performance and position for users external to management. Approximately one third of the course emphasizes how the accountant processes and presents the information and includes exposure to recording transactions, adjusting balances and preparing financial statements for service and merchandise firms according to established rules and procedures. The balance of the course examines major elements of the statements such as cash, receivables, inventory, long'lived assets, depreciation, payroll, bonds, and other liabilities and stocks. Concepts of this course are applied to Managerial Accounting (ACCT 225). Students are advised to avoid any time lapse between these courses.
  • ACCT 225 - MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (4)

    ACCT 225

    MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING

    Course Description

    The study of management accounting for internal reporting and decision-making. The course introduces a business-management approach to the development and use of accounting information. Major topics include cost behavior, cost analysis, profit planning and control measures. Accounting for decentralized operations, capital budgeting decisions, and ethical challenges in managerial accounting are also covered.
  • BSAD 220 - BUSINESS LAW (4)

    BSAD 220

    BUSINESS LAW

    Course Description

    A study of the everyday legal problems encountered in business with emphasis on the areas of legal procedure, contracts, agency, employment law, business organizations and torts, with cases relating to these and other areas.
  • ECON 210 - INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS (4)

    ECON 210

    INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS

    Course Description

    An introduction to economic theory involving the examination of how decision making by firms and individuals is shaped by economic forces. Emphasis is placed on demand, supply, market equilibrium analysis, and basic market structure models. The invisible hand as the driving force for economic decisions as well as market externalities are discussed. The class concentrates on providing a balanced approach to studying economic agents' behavior and the global implications and outcomes.
  • FINA 301 - PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE (4)

    FINA 301

    PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE

    Course Description

    This course is designed to survey the field of finance and provide the foundation for more advanced finance coursework. Topics include sources of business and financial information, financial statement analysis, the time value of money, the nature and measurement of risk, financial institutions, investments and corporate finance.
  • MGMT 312 - PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (4)

    MGMT 312

    PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT

    Course Description

    This course explores the basic concepts and processes of management. Students will explore the functional roles and processes of planning, leading, organizing, and controlling comprising the manager role. Students develop skills related to the manager function that are required in today's competitive environment.
  • MKTG 300 - MARKETING (4)

    MKTG 300

    MARKETING

    Course Description

    Theory, strategies and methods are foundational to the informed practice of marketing. Students investigate the importance of marketing to an organization or cause, the interrelationship of the difference phases of marketing, the marketing of goods versus services, analysis and identification of markets, pricing strategies and digital marketing tactics. Please note: A book fee of $59.70 will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials.

University Electives (22 hours)

  • Any undergraduate courses offered by the University except developmental education courses.

Major Area (40 hours)

  • BSAD 320 - QUANTITATIVE & QUALITATIVE METHODS FOR DECISION MAKING (4)

    BSAD 320

    QUANTITATIVE & QUALITATIVE METHODS FOR DECISION MAKING

    Course Description

    This course focuses on the development of individual and team decision-making and problem solving skills. Real world domestic and global issues will be analyzed, diagnosed, and evaluated through the application of a variety of quantitative and qualitative tools and techniques used to arrive at effective decisions and solutions.
  • MGMT 325 - ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR (4)

    MGMT 325

    ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

    Course Description

    This course focuses on the organizational processes and theoretical constructs related to organizational behavior. The roles of leaders, followers, and teams and their influence on the culture and performance of an organization are addressed through the analysis of key organizational behavior concepts and related cases. Topics will include: values, perception, attitudes, assumptions, learning, motivation, conflict, diversity, and change. Please note: A book fee of $54.35 will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials.
  • OSCM 378 - BUSINESS MODELING (4)

    OSCM 378

    BUSINESS MODELING

    Course Description

    This course provides the foundations of quantitative analysis methods used in business and operations management problems. Students will be able to develop analytical skills in modeling and analysis of problems faced by business and operations managers. Some of the topics covered are: linear programming, network and transportation analysis, queuing models and simulation.
  • OSCM 390 - OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (4)

    OSCM 390

    OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

    Course Description

    This course instructs students on how manufacturing and service operations contribute to organizational strategy. Concepts such as productivity, economies of scale, vertical and horizontal integration, and push vs. pull will be explained. Implications of applying "Green" policies to materials and processes will be explained.
  • OSCM 440 - QUALITY MANAGEMENT (4)

    OSCM 440

    QUALITY MANAGEMENT

    Course Description

    This course provides students with understanding and knowledge of the philosophies and methods used to improve effectiveness and efficiency of organizational processes. Quality concepts from Juran and Deming will be discussed along with more current quality concepts such as six-sigma, black-belt quality associates, and total quality management (TQM). In addition, issues applying quality concepts to global companies will be explained.
  • OSCM 450 - SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT (4)

    OSCM 450

    SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

    Course Description

    This course will expose students to topics related to design and management of supply chains, from incoming raw materials to final product delivery. Course topics will include supply chain network design, facility planning, capacity planning, globalization and outsourcing, information technology, and global issues in supply chain management.
  • OSCM 455 - TRANSPORTATION AND LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT (4)

    OSCM 455

    TRANSPORTATION AND LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT

    Course Description

    This course explores the transportation and logistics concepts within supply chains. Topics covered will include tools and techniques used in the design and operation of transportation and logistics systems and global issues in transportation and logistics management. In addition, "Quick Response" scenarios used to handle transportation and logistics issues, in the event of natural and non-natural disasters, will be explained.
  • OSCM 458 - PURCHASING AND INVENTORY MANAGEMENT (4)

    OSCM 458

    PURCHASING AND INVENTORY MANAGEMENT

    Course Description

    This course will provide students with the concepts of purchasing and inventory management. Topics covered are purchasing and inventory planning processes, supplier selection, contract negotiations, "Green" policies, and procurement.
  • OSCM 491 - INTEGRATED PROJECT MANAGEMENT (4)

    OSCM 491

    INTEGRATED PROJECT MANAGEMENT

    Course Description

    This course will instruct the student to manage multiple organizations and projects. Concepts on how to deal with organizational obstacles, risk, and project development will be covered.
  • OSCM 495 - OPERATIONS & SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT CAPSTONE (4)

    OSCM 495

    OPERATIONS & SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT CAPSTONE

    Course Description

    This course will provide the student with a cumulative experience for the Operations and Supply Chain Management major. The student will use all the knowledge gained in the previous classes on operations management, supply chain management, quality, transportation, and purchasing in developing operational strategies for real-life applications.

Additional Requirements

  • All students are required to pass College Writing (WRIT 120), either Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121) or Learning Strategies (PF 321) and either Speech Communication (SPCH 100) or Interpersonal Communication (COMM 150) prior to enrolling in any other course at the 200 level or above. Either PF 121 or PF 321 must be taken prior to the first BLF course, or it may be taken concurrently with the first 15-week BLF course. Students who enroll at Franklin with 30 or fewer hours of transfer credit are required to pass Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121) in place of Learning Strategies (PF 321). Students must also meet the University algebra competency requirement.

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New students can apply for up to $6,000 in scholarships.
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Please see the Academic Bulletin for the complete list of degree and residency requirements.

Additional Curriculum

Operations & Supply Chain Management - Subsequent Bachelor of Science Degree

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Looking to earn an additional bachelor’s degree? A subsequent degree is specifically designed for students who have already completed a bachelor's degree or higher.

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