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A.S. Cybersecurity

Secure your future with an associate degree in cybersecurity

Program Note: The A.S. Cybersecurity is offered exclusively through Franklin University partnership agreements. Program applicants must meet the eligibility requirements specified as part of the partnership. 

Cyber threats are on the rise, not to mention becoming increasingly more complex. Large, medium or small, no business is immune from them. Worse, catastrophic data loss through cybercrime can disrupt -- and even bankrupt -- a business or industry. For that reason, cyber security professionals are needed like never before. Launch your career in this dynamic field by earning your A.S. Cybersecurity from Franklin. 

Program not available in

Online
On Site

Broad-Based Technology Curriculum

Get exposed to a variety of tech-focused pathways.

Real-World Practitioners

Learn from experienced technology leaders.

100% Online Classes

Earn your degree around your schedule.

Program Overview

Learn data security from a 360º perspective

Network, computer and data breaches can have a devastating bottom-line effect on business. Earn your A.S. Cybersecurity and learn how to help businesses protect themselves from costly cyber attacks.

At Franklin, you’ll learn how to make a real impact on business by helping protect sensitive and critical information from unauthorized disclosure, use or modification (accidental or not). You’ll also learn how security requirements and activities, such as risk identification, threat modeling, security testing and monitoring, fit into the overall systems development lifecycle.

Because our cybersecurity degree requirements are designed to help you make the most of your major, you’ll learn the fundamentals of computer science, information technology, security, information systems and web design, too. You will be exposed to critical infrastructure security, cloud computing risks, cryptography, information assurance, digital forensics, penetration testing and enterprise risk management.You’ll also learn how to identify security risks, determine their impact on people, processes and systems, and develop mitigation plans to thwart them. Through hands-on lab assignments, you’ll also gain valuable experience in how to respond to increasingly malicious attacks, threats and vulnerabilities.

Our associate in cybersecurity degree program is 100 percent online, so you can earn your degree and still have work-life-school balance, too. And, if you decide to pursue your bachelor’s degree at Franklin, you’ll already have a strong foundation of coursework to prepare you to complete the B.S. Cybersecurity degree program and open yourself up to even more career opportunities.

Earn your degree from a university built for busy adults

Earn your degree on your terms by taking classes 100% online or pursue available coursework at one of our Midwest locations. Regionally accredited and nonprofit, Franklin was built from the ground-up to satisfy the needs of adult learners. Our seamless transfer process and team of academic advisors will help ease your transition to becoming a student, while our flexible course schedules help to balance your education with work, family, and life. Get started on your future today.

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Curriculum & Course Descriptions

60 Semester Hours
Fundamental General Education Core (36 hours)
WRIT 120 - College Writing (4)
In this course, students acquire the writing competence necessary for conducting and presenting research. A variety of assignments, beginning with personal reflections, build upon one another, as students develop ideas that respond to, critique, and synthesize the positions of others. Students systematize and organize knowledge in ways that will help them in all of their courses. The course also emphasizes the elements of good writing style, appropriate grammar and mechanics, clarity of language, and logical and cohesive development. It culminates in submission of a documented research paper.
MATH 160 - College Algebra (4)
This course is designed to prepare students for Applied Calculus and Discrete Mathematics and to provide the mathematical background needed for the analytic reasoning used in other courses. Topics include functions and their graphs, including exponential and logarithmic functions; complex numbers; systems of equations and inequalities; matrices; basic principles of counting and probability; and other selected topics.
OR MATH 280 - Introduction to Probability & Statistics (4)
This course is designed to serve students in the Computer and Information Sciences majors. The topics covered are descriptive statistics in numerical & graphical methods, probability concepts, discrete and continuous probability distributions, estimation theory, hypothesis testing, simple linear regression and correlation, and linear programming. These topics will be taught with a rigorous Algebra content and using a statistical software such as Minitab.
Science: Choose from the Science discipline (6)
Social and behavioral sciences: Choose from the Social and Behavioral Sciences discipline (6)
Arts and Humanities: Choose HUMN 211 and 4 additional hours from the Arts and Humanities discipline (6)
PF 121 - Basic Learning Strategies (2)
This course introduces students to the Franklin University community and provides strategies for successful transition to and participation in that community. Topics include University resources and procedures, strategies for advancing communication skills, the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments, and the development of an academic and career plan.
OR PF 321 - Learning Strategies (2)
This course prepares students to be successful lifelong learners both academically and in their chosen careers. Franklin courses require a high level of self-directed learning and focus on skills required in the workplace and the classroom that are easily transferable between the two environments. The course includes strategies for advancing communication skills, including the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments. The assignments and activities in the course are created to closely simulate teamwork found in the workplace.
COMM 150 - Interpersonal Communication (4)
By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
OR SPCH 100 - Speech Communication (4)
This public-speaking course emphasizes the fundamentals of extemporaneous speaking. Skill-building activities and assignments focus on research, organization, reasoning, style and delivery of presentations as well as listening and audience engagement.
WRIT 220 - Research Writing: Exploring Professional (4)
This is an intermediate course focusing on the composition of research papers. Students in this course prepare to be active participants in professional discourse communities by examining and practicing the writing conventions associated with their own fields of study and work. By calling attention to the conventions of disciplinary writing, the course also prepares students for upper-division college writing and the special conventions of advanced academic discourse. Course activities include three extended research papers, semi-formal writing addressing interdisciplinary communication, and readings fostering critical engagement with disciplinary conversations.
Major Area (24 hours)
COMP 101 - Problem Solving With Computing (2)
Many organizations today utilize computers and information systems to store, organize, analyze, and summarize data to solve problems. As a result, computing is a tool that can benefit students in many different fields. At the heart of solving problems with computers is the study of structured thinking using algorithms. This course is designed for students with no prior programming experience and teaches the building blocks of algorithms, including variables, expressions, selection and repetition structures, functions and parameters, and array processing.
ITEC 136 - Principles of Programming (4)
This course covers fundamental programming principles for individuals with at least some programming background. Major themes are structured programming, problem solving, algorithm design, top-down stepwise refinement, and software lifecycle. Topics will include testing, data types, operators, repetition and selection control structures, functions, arrays, and objects. Students will design, code, test, debug, and document programs in a relevant programming language. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
COMP 204 - Principles of Computer Networks (2)
This course serves as an introduction to the function, design, administration, and implementation of computer networks. Topics include network infrastructure, architecture, protocols, applications, and the OSI networking model.
COMP 281 - Database Management Systems (4)
This course covers fundamental concepts necessary for the design, use, implementation and administration of database systems. The course will stress the fundamentals of database modeling and design, the languages and facilities provided by database management systems, and some techniques for implementing and administering database systems. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
ISEC 200 - Cyber Security Fundamentals (2)
The Internet has changed dramatically; so have the activities that are dependent on it in some shape or form. Understanding the need for security, it's influence on people, businesses and society, as well as business drivers is critical. The course also covers malicious attacks, threats and vulnerabilities common to the world of security, as well as access controls, and methods to assess and respond to risks. Hands-on labs accompany the various concepts that are taught.
ISEC 325 - Communication & Network Security (4)
Networks are the major point of entry to most computer systems. Preventing unwanted intrusion, use, abuse, or flooding of communications channels is a high priority to organizations trying to protect their assets. Network security is about preserving the appropriate use of network resources while preventing disallowed use. In this course, you will learn how to employ firewalls, VPNs, and stateful packet inspection techniques to harden computer networks. Topics include packet filtering, intrusion detection and prevention, ingress and egress rules, monitoring, network access controls, authentication, authorization, and auditing. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
MIS 200 - Management Information Systems (4)
The purpose of this course is to provide the fundamentals associated with the management of information technology in a business enterprise. These fundamentals are business concepts in which the influence of information technology has caused change or brought about new concepts. Special emphasis will be placed on understanding the managerial issues that are relevant to usage of computers. The student will be given problems isolating these issues and will be asked to propose solutions with alternatives.
WEBD 101 - Introduction to Web Page Construction (2)
This course covers the fundamental concepts necessary for the construction of web pages using the basic building blocks of Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (css). HTML and XHTML are covered in detail for building web pages using a web page development environment. The use of styling using css is introduced.

Program Details

Career Opportunities

Information Systems Security Specialist

Information systems security specialists participate in the assessment of computer, network and information systems threats, vulnerabilities and breaches.

Operating Systems Security Specialist

Operating systems security specialists assists with monitoring and maintaining a stable, controlled and secure operating environment.

Applications Security Specialist

Applications security specialists support the identification of vulnerabilities and perform root-cause analysis of security-related applications issues.

Information Assurance Security Specialist

Information assurance security specialists assist with security risk management, including identifying weaknesses, addressing vulnerabilities and preventing unauthorized access.

Cybersecurity Engineer

Cybersecurity engineers lead cybersecurity operations, build technical roadmaps and manage virtual network models.

Cybersecurity Threat Analyst

Cybersecurity threat analysts inspect internal cyber network operations, and emerging cyber threats and trends, including complex malware and exploits through forensics and network traffic. 

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