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B.S. Cyber Security

Guard against digital threats with a cyber security degree

When data networks and computer systems are compromised, exposed or exploited, the effects can be more far-reaching than any single business entity -- it can literally affect millions of customers. That’s why cyber security has exploded as a field: to provide critical protection of information assets from unauthorized or unintentional disclosure, modification or loss. With Franklin's transfer-friendly, online B.S. Cyber Security degree program, you'll learn how to respond to security breaches with state-of-the-art tactics and countermeasures.

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Finish Faster

Transfer up to 94 previously earned college credits.

Real-World Experience

Participate in a true-to-life security simulation.

Real-World Practitioners

Learn from experienced technology leaders.

360-Degree Education

Become more well-rounded, thanks to a variety of course offerings.

100% Online Classes

Earn your degree around your schedule.

Accredited Online University

Nearly 80% of our students take online courses.

Program Overview

Mitigate risk and provide critical protection against digital hijacking

Franklin University’s Cyber Security degree program prepares you for a red-hot career in business, industry or government, protecting valuable data (and the bottom line) from security threats and hackers. So in-demand are cyber security professionals, that a 2015 report from Burning Glass reported that cyber security workers command 9 percent more in salary than other IT professionals.Perhaps that's why cyber security jobs are projected to grow by 18 percent, which is much faster than average between 2015 and 2025.*

Learn industry-standard cyber security methodologies

To prepare you for this exploding career field, you’ll learn the “defense in depth” approach, featuring layered security architecture with appropriate controls and countermeasures. Along with this methodology of comprehensive information and electronic defense, Franklin’s Cyber Security degree online program covers key knowledge areas as defined by the International Information Systems Security Certification Consortium (ISC) ². 

Gain valuable, real-world experience assessing actual security needs

At Franklin, you’ll get a far-reaching, 360-degree education with classes in technology, policy, management, and architecture, along with a solid foundation in information technology principles, including programming, database, systems, and networks. You’ll not only learn the “what” of enterprise security, but also the “how” and “why.” And you’ll get real-world experience when you choose a local business or nonprofit organization for which you’ll prepare a security plan, risk assessment, penetration test, vulnerability scan, and more, assisting with their actual security needs.

Moreover, industry experts, such as C. Matthew Curtin, Founder of Interhack Corporation, review Franklin’s Cyber Security program, ensuring that your Franklin education stays ahead-of-the-curve with a full-breadth of security courses combined with hands-on security exercises in a virtual environment. 

Earn a bachelor's degree focused exclusively on cyber security

Because it is a specialized field of industry, Franklin University offers a major in cyber security — rather than a component of another related program. 

Courses in this curriculum include risk management and compliance; security architecture and controls; business continuity and operations; and network and application security. At Franklin, you’ll learn about the typical development mistakes that lead to application-level security issues, including CSRF, XSS, cryptography, configuration errors, authentication, and authorization, as well as how to defend against them.

This program also teaches you about design and implementation of high-availability systems through storage redundancy, load balancing, virtualization clusters, and disaster recovery systems. And, you’ll have the opportunity to learn how security requirements and activities, such as risk identification, threat modeling, security testing, and monitoring, fit into the overall systems development lifecycle (SDLC).

Earn your degree from a university built for busy adults

Earn your degree on your terms by taking classes 100% online or pursue available coursework at one of our Midwest locations. Regionally accredited and nonprofit, Franklin was built from the ground-up to satisfy the needs of adult learners. Our seamless transfer process and team of academic advisors will help ease your transition to becoming a student, while our flexible course schedules help to balance your education with work, family, and life. Get started on your future today.

*Source information provided by Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI)

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Curriculum & Course Descriptions

124 Semester Hours
Fundamental General Education Core (24 hours)
English Composition

Choose a minimum of 3 semester hours from:

WRIT 120 - COLLEGE WRITING (4)
In this course, students acquire the writing competence necessary for conducting and presenting research. A variety of assignments, beginning with personal reflections, build upon one another, as students develop ideas that respond to, critique, and synthesize the positions of others. Students systematize and organize knowledge in ways that will help them in all of their courses. The course also emphasizes the elements of good writing style, appropriate grammar and mechanics, clarity of language, and logical and cohesive development. It culminates in submission of a documented research paper.

*If the course does not have a research paper component, WRIT 130 Research Paper, two semester credits, is also required.

Mathematics

Choose a minimum of three semester hours from:

MATH 160 - COLLEGE ALGEBRA (4)
This course is designed to prepare students for Applied Calculus and Discrete Mathematics and to provide the mathematical background needed for the analytic reasoning used in other courses. Topics include functions and their graphs, including exponential and logarithmic functions; complex numbers; systems of equations and inequalities; matrices; basic principles of counting and probability; and other selected topics.

Choose MATH 150 Fundamental Algebra as the prerequisite. This course can count as a general education or University elective.

*at least one mathematics or statistics course beyond the level of intermediate algebra.

Sciences

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

SCIE 210 - UNDERSTANDING SCIENCE: PRINCIPLES, PRACTICE, & THEORY (2)
Understanding Science: Principles, Practice & Theory is a two credit hour course that introduces students to the major themes, processes, and methods common to all scientific disciplines. Students will develop critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate all kinds of phenomena, scientific, pseudoscientific, and other. The focus is on the nature of science so students will develop an understanding of how science works and develop an appreciation for the process by which we gain scientific knowledge.
SCIE 211 - INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC ANALYSIS & REASONING (4)
Introduction to Scientific Analysis and Reasoning is a four credit hour course consisting of three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of laboratory. This course is an introduction to critical thinking on statistical and scientific claims. The student will develop the critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate popular sources of (mis)information and to better understand and evaluate all sorts of scientific claims and arguments. The focus of the course is on students developing thoughtful and critical use of scientific information and research to be able to separate truth from deception and make decisions that affect their personal lives and roles as informed and engaged citizens.

*Two science courses, with one having a laboratory component.

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

  • Choose coursework from the Anthropology, Economics, Psychology, and Sociology disciplines, or PUAD 295 American Government in Action.

*The six semester hours must come from at least two different disciplines

Arts and Humanities

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

HUMN 211 - INTRO TO ETHICAL ANALYSIS AND REASONING (2)
The goal of this course is to help you improve your ethical analysis and reasoning skills. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing ethical arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. In this course, you will discover how to apply the following questions to your job and everyday life. Why do we need ethics if we have laws to govern our behavior' Does the majority view determine what is ethical and what is not' Are feelings, desires, and preferences reliable ethical guides' Is it ever appropriate to criticize another individual's (or culture's) ethical judgment' Are people always responsible for their actions' Do human beings have a natural tendency to good, a natural tendency to evil' both' neither' Is there a single moral code that is binding on all people, at all times, and in all places'
  • Choose additional coursework from the Humanities discipline.

Additional General Education Requirements (12 hours)
COMP 106 - INTRODUCTION TO SPREADSHEETS (1)
This course focuses on using spreadsheets to solve business applications.
COMP 108 - INTRODUCTION TO DATABASES (1)
This course focuses on using databases to solve business applications.
PF 321 - LEARNING STRATEGIES (2)
This course prepares students to be successful lifelong learners both academically and in their chosen careers. Franklin courses require a high level of self-directed learning and focus on skills required in the workplace and the classroom that are easily transferable between the two environments. The course includes strategies for advancing communication skills, including the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments. The assignments and activities in the course are created to closely simulate teamwork found in the workplace.
COMM 150 - INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION (4)
By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
OR SPCH 100 - SPEECH COMMUNICATION (4)
A basic public speaking course intended to improve the student's ability to think critically and to communicate orally. Theory and practice are provided in various speaking situations. Each student is required to speak before an audience, but class work also involves reading, gathering and organizing information, writing and listening.
WRIT 320 - BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WRITING (4)
This is an advanced composition course that focuses on writing for business and professional purposes. Students will review the writing conventions commonly expected within business and professional environments, as well as strategies for analyzing rhetorical situations within those environments. Coursework includes analysis, revision, and research exercises, as well as substantial practice in composing business correspondence. The final project is an extensive, researched business proposal developed in stages and presented to the class. Students will be encouraged to relate course materials to their major programs and workplace experiences.
Professional Core (24 hours)
COMP 101 - PROBLEM SOLVING WITH COMPUTING (2)
Many organizations today utilize computers and information systems to store, organize, analyze, and summarize data to solve problems. As a result, computing is a tool that can benefit students in many different fields. At the heart of solving problems with computers is the study of structured thinking using algorithms. This course is designed for students with no prior programming experience and teaches the building blocks of algorithms, including variables, expressions, selection and repetition structures, functions and parameters, and array processing.
COMP 204 - PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER NETWORKS (2)
This course serves as an introduction to the function, design, administration, and implementation of computer networks. Topics include network infrastructure, architecture, protocols, applications, and the OSI networking model.
COMP 281 - DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (4)
This course covers fundamental concepts necessary for the design, use, implementation and administration of database systems. The course will stress the fundamentals of database modeling and design, the languages and facilities provided by database management systems, and some techniques for implementing and administering database systems. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
ISEC 200 - CYBER SECURITY FUNDAMENTALS (2)
The Internet has changed dramatically; so have the activities that are dependent on it in some shape or form. Understanding the need for security, it's influence on people, businesses and society, as well as business drivers is critical. The course also covers malicious attacks, threats and vulnerabilities common to the world of security, as well as access controls, and methods to assess and respond to risks. Hands-on labs accompany the various concepts that are taught.
ISEC 325 - NETWORK SECURITY (4)
Networks are the major point of entry to most computer systems. Preventing unwanted intrusion, use, abuse, or flooding of communications channels is a high priority to organizations trying to protect their assets. Network security is about preserving the appropriate use of network resources while preventing disallowed use. In this course, you will learn how to employ firewalls, VPNs, and stateful packet inspection techniques to harden computer networks. Topics include packet filtering, intrusion detection and prevention, ingress and egress rules, monitoring, network access controls, authentication, authorization, and auditing. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
ITEC 136 - PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING (4)
This course covers fundamental programming principles for individuals with at least some programming background. Major themes are structured programming, problem solving, algorithm design, top-down stepwise refinement, and software lifecycle. Topics will include testing, data types, operators, repetition and selection control structures, functions, arrays, and objects. Students will design, code, test, debug, and document programs in a relevant programming language. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
MIS 200 - MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (4)
The purpose of this course is to provide the fundamentals associated with the management of information technology in a business enterprise. These fundamentals are business concepts in which the influence of information technology has caused change or brought about new concepts. Special emphasis will be placed on understanding the managerial issues that are relevant to usage of computers. The student will be given problems isolating these issues and will be asked to propose solutions with alternatives.
WEBD 101 - INTRODUCTION TO WEB PAGE CONSTRUCTION (2)
This course covers the fundamental concepts necessary for the construction of web pages using the basic building blocks of Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (css). HTML and XHTML are covered in detail for building web pages using a web page development environment. The use of styling using css is introduced.
University Electives (26 hours)
  • Any undergraduate courses offered by the University except developmental education courses.

Major Area (36 hours)
ISEC 300 - INFORMATION ASSURANCE (4)
In a highly connected, data intensive, and cost-focused business environment, the practice of information security not a business advantage; it is a customer requirement. Viruses, malware, trojans, denial of service attacks, phishing, and even Wiki leaks have become headline news. Failure to insure the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of data costs companies millions, if not billions of dollars in legal settlements, lost business, and trade secrets. In this breadth-based course, you will get an overview of information security principles and practices, including security models, risk management, access controls, intrusion detection and prevention, cryptography, software vulnerabilities, and ethical issues. Subsequent courses expand on this foundational material in much greater depth. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
ISEC 350 - SECURITY RISK MANAGEMENT (4)
Proper assessment, management, and mitigation of risk are essential to any information security strategy. Risks aren't just related to IT assets, but to the overall business that the IT organization is supporting, thus, business continuity planning and impact analysis is also important. In this course, you will learn how to identify and analyze risks, determine impacts, and develop plans to mitigate issues. Topics include threats, vulnerabilities, exploits, and countermeasures; US compliance laws; risk assessment and mitigation; business impact analysis; and business continuity and disaster recovery planning.
ISEC 375 - DIGITAL FORENSICS & INCIDENT RESPONSE (4)
The prevalence of data breaches, identity theft, and the dark net today makes the study of digital forensics and cybercrime highly relevant to information security. Identifying, acquiring, preserving, analyzing and reporting evidence to business and law enforcement is a much-needed skill. This course will cover those topics as well as the live versus dead-box techniques, appropriate legal and regulatory issues, open source and commercial tools, and the special challenges represented by new and emerging technologies.
ISEC 400 - SOFTWARED DEVELOPMENT SECURITY (4)
Software vulnerabilities, especially those that compromise personal or financial data, are appallingly common. Nearly every major software company has needed to deal with the fallout of a major incident due to vulnerabilities in their products. Writing correct - let alone secure - software is very difficult. Yet users and executives expect it. In this course, you will learn about the typical development mistakes that lead to application-level security issues as well as how to defend against them. Students will explore the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) top 10 security vulnerabilities. Topics include unchecked user input, injection, fuzzing, CSRF, XSS, cryptography, CAPTCHA, configuration errors, authentication, and authorization.
ISEC 475 - SECURITY ENGINEERING & ASSESSMENT (4)
Ensuring the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of large and complex systems is notoriously difficult in the face of capable and determined opponents. This course discusses security engineering as the practical application of requirements analysis, modeling, architecture, processes, and measurement toward improving the dependability of complex information systems throughout their lifecycle.
ISEC 495 - CYBER SECURITY CAPSTONE (4)
The Information Security Capstone course encourages teamwork in small groups on a substantial project. The intent of this course is to provide a capstone experience that integrates the material contained in courses required of the information security major. It also provides an opportunity for students to recognize and evaluate the interrelationship of their general education courses with the courses taken for their information security major. The major areas of the program are reviewed and assessed via standardized exams. Students will also culminate their experiences with an overview of the evolution of computer systems and a look at the near-term future. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
ITEC 350 - WINDOWS ADMINISTRATION (4)
This course provides the student with an introduction to Windows Server 2008 administration and is structured to assist a network manager or planner in planning, configuring, installing, running, and repairing networks that include a Windows Server 2008. As such, it provides an introduction to server installation, Active Directory, printer management, domains, network clients, security, disaster recovery, fault/error management, and scripting of common tasks. This course also uses virtualization software to isolate the Windows Server 2008 operating system from the underlying host operating system. As such, administrative access to a fast machine running Windows XP or better with at least 2 gigabytes of memory and 40 gigabytes of available hard drive space is required. For face to face classes, an external USB 2.0 hard drive with at least 40 gigabytes of free space is required to bring to class.
MIS 310 - INFORMATION SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE & TECHNOLOGY (4)
This course provides a conceptual survey of general systems theory followed by a conceptual and technological survey of the structure of distributed information systems architectures, operating systems, network operating systems, peripheral technology and user interfaces. Interoperability between these architectural components will be explored and current technology and trends in each architectural element will be reviewed. This course will de-emphasize, although not ignore, mainframe architectures in favor of information architectures more applicable to client/server computing. The various interacting categories of client/server computing as well as the benefits and implications of such a system will be fully explored.
WEBD 236 - WEB INFORMATION SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING (4)
This course builds web applications by employing server-side scripts that query relational databases. The student learns and reflects on two- and three-tier software architectures, separation of responsibility, model-view-controller pattern, basic security, and web frameworks. The student will design, code, test, debug, and document programs using a server-based scripting language. Note: This is a technology course in a technology program, and it requires the purchase of software that may be used in subsequent courses as well as being suitable for commercial work beyond completion of degree studies. For specific software requirements, consult the course syllabus.
Additional Requirements

All students are required to pass College Writing (WRIT 120), either Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121) or Learning Strategies (PF 321) and either Speech Communication (SPCH 100) or Interpersonal Communication (COMM 150) prior to enrolling in any other course at the 200 level or above. Either PF 121 or PF 321 must be taken prior to the first BLF course, or it may be taken concurrently with the first 15-week BLF course. Students who enroll at Franklin with 30 or fewer hours of transfer credit are required to pass Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121) in place of Learning Strategies (PF 321). Students must also meet the University algebra competency requirement.

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Program Details

Career Opportunities

Application Security Tester

Application Security Testers perform assessments, source code reviews and security tests to identify, understand, thwart, and remedy web application threats, vulnerabilities, and attacks.

Computer Security Specialist

Computer Security Specialists plan, implement, monitor, and upgrade control measures and solutions to protect computer networks and computer-based information from unauthorized use, breach, and/or disaster.

Cyber Security Analyst

Cyber Security Analysts prevent, monitor, and respond to data breaches, protecting information against hackers.

Cyber Security Engineer

Cyber security engineers lead cyber security operations, build technical roadmaps and manage virtual network models.

Cyber Threat Analyst

Cyber Threat Analysts identify, monitor, assess, and counter threats posed to an organization using strategic assessments and tactical analysis.

Data Security Analyst

Data Security Analysts ensure the integrity of computer-based information by monitoring networks, programs, and digital files for vulnerabilities, and recommending security protection protocol.

Identity Management Specialist

Identity Management Specialists oversee identity protection protocols, ensuring that identity risks are minimized or thwarted, and that users are properly identified and granted appropriate access to systems and data according to business need.

Information Security Engineer

Information Security Engineers design, test, and monitor computer security systems to ensure that data and digital informaiton is safe from security threats and breaches.

Information Security Manager

Information Security Managers develop and oversee organizational policies, procedures, and methodologies to ensure the protection of data and information against compromise by hackers, viruses, and other threats.

Network Security Specialist

Network Security Specialists structure, install, and manage network information systems to prevent the loss of data and respond appropriately to security breaches

Security Architect

Security Architects create computer network and software protection plans to protect systems from invasion, abnormal activity, or hackers.

Security Administrator

Security Administrators protect computer system data by implementing security policies and procedures, such as system backups, password scripts, and anti-virus software.

Employment Outlook

18%

From 1015-2025 jobs in Cyber Security are expected to increase by 18%

All Occupations

2015
69,131 jobs
2025
81,575 jobs


Source information provided by Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) - June 2016

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