B.S. Information Technology
124
Credit Hours
76%
Max Transfer Credit
Class Type
100% online, 6 & 12-week courses
Next Start Date
Aug 16, 2021
Cost Per Credit
Curriculum Alignment
PMBOK Guide & (ISC)2's CISSP

Back up your technology expertise with an information technology degree

Information technology professionals have described the profession in just three words. “Challenge with reward.” And no wonder. IT is one of the fastest growing and most diverse fields. From database administration to infrastructure analysis, IT is the cornerstone of business technology support. With Franklin’s B.S. Information Technology degree program, you’ll be well prepared for a dynamic career in every type of industry from government to enterprise, nonprofit to corporate, and business to healthcare.

Program Availability

On Site

Take the next step toward your degree!

Request free program information or submit your online application.

Finish Faster

Transfer up to 94 previously earned college credits.

Customizable Program

Take your pick of exciting electives.

Real-World Practitioners

Learn from experienced technology leaders.

Go Beyond IT

Become both a technology champion and a more effective communicator.

Accredited Online University

Nearly 80% of our students take online courses.

In-Demand Skills

Learn from a leader in preparing working adults for career advancement.

Information Technology Degree Overview

Support business operations with technical know-how

Franklin’s transfer-friendly Information Technology degree program curriculum equips you with the mission-critical skills employers are looking for in the areas of network and systems administration, infrastructure management, information security, database administration, and IT project management.

Our faculty employs industry standards such as Project Management Institute’s PMBOK Guide and (ISC)2’s CISSP certification in their teaching, and our program is consistently evaluated by industry experts like Sean Amon, Associate Vice President for Network Engineering at Nationwide Insurance.

Become an IT champion with expert knowledge

Our online IT degree program curriculum will add depth to your existing IT knowledge and experience. You’ll learn how to administer Windows Server, Linux, Oracle 10g, Firewalls, Cisco switches and routers, IP addressing, WAN, and Wireless LAN. You’ll be introduced to programming languages like Perl, Shell, and PowerShell. You’ll also be prepared to build, connect, and manage the systems and devices of major computing platforms.

And, just as important, Franklin will equip you to effectively communicate your work to business leadership, stakeholders, end users and others, preparing you to be an IT champion for everything from daily operational activities to new technologies.

Transfer previously earned credits in related IT courses

Franklin accepts many industry certifications in lieu of select coursework for transfer credit, including Network+ and CCNA for networking, PMI for project management, CISSP and Security+ for security, RHCA/RHCE for Linux, and MSCA/MCSE for Windows.

You may also be eligible to transfer previously earned credits in courses related to databases, computer graphics, operating systems, networks, web design and implementation, multimedia technologies, programming, and other approved IT-related areas.

Or, if you don’t have previously earned credits or specialized certifications, credits earned in a Franklin associate degree program apply directly to this Bachelor of Science (BS) in Information Technology program.

Earn your IT degree from a university built for busy adults

Earn your degree on your terms by taking classes 100% online or pursue available coursework at our Main Campus. Regionally accredited and nonprofit, Franklin was built from the ground-up to satisfy the needs of adult learners. Our seamless transfer process and team of academic advisors will help ease your transition to becoming a student, while our flexible course schedules help to balance your education with work, family, and life. Get started on your future today.

*Source information provided by Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI)

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Information Technology Courses & Curriculum

124 Semester Hours
Fundamental General Education
English Composition
ENG 120 - College Writing (4)

In this course, students acquire the writing competence necessary for conducting and presenting research. A variety of assignments, beginning with personal reflections, build upon one another, as students develop ideas that respond to, critique, and synthesize the positions of others. Students systematize and organize knowledge in ways that will help them in all of their courses. The course also emphasizes the elements of good writing style, appropriate grammar and mechanics, clarity of language, and logical and cohesive development. It culminates in submission of a documented research paper.

Mathematics
MATH 160 - College Algebra (4)

This course is designed to prepare students for Applied Calculus and Discrete Mathematics and to provide the mathematical background needed for the analytic reasoning used in other courses. Topics include functions and their graphs, including exponential and logarithmic functions; complex numbers; systems of equations and inequalities; matrices; basic principles of counting and probability; and other selected topics.

Choose MATH 150 Fundamental Algebra as the prerequisite. Course can count as a University elective.

Social and Behavioral Sciences

6 credits from the following types of courses:
•Choose coursework from the Anthropology, Economics, Psychology Political Science, and Sociology disciplines.

Science

6 credits from the following types of courses:
Two courses from the Science discipline. One course must have a lab component.

Arts & Humanities
HUMN 211 - Intro to Ethical Analysis & Reasoning (2)

The goal of this course is to help you improve your ethical analysis and reasoning skills. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing ethical arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. In this course, you will discover how to apply the following questions to your job and everyday life. Why do we need ethics if we have laws to govern our behavior? Does the majority view determine what is ethical and what is not? Are feelings, desires, and preferences reliable ethical guides? Is it ever appropriate to criticize another individual's (or culture's) ethical judgment? Are people always responsible for their actions? Do human beings have a natural tendency to good, a natural tendency to evil? both? neither? Is there a single moral code that is binding on all people, at all times, and in all places?

4 credits from the following types of courses:
Choose from the Art, English Literature, Fine Arts, Humanities, Music, Philosophy, Religion or Theater disciplines.

Additional General Education
PF 121 - Basic Learning Strategies (2)

This course introduces students to the Franklin University community and provides strategies for successful transition to and participation in that community. Topics include University resources and procedures, strategies for advancing communication skills, the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments, and the development of an academic and career plan.

OR PF 321 - Learning Strategies (2)

This course prepares students to be successful lifelong learners both academically and in their chosen careers. Franklin courses require a high level of self-directed learning and focus on skills required in the workplace and the classroom that are easily transferable between the two environments. The course includes strategies for advancing communication skills, including the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments. The assignments and activities in the course are created to closely simulate teamwork found in the workplace.

COMM 150 - Interpersonal Communication (4)

By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking.

OR SPCH 100 - Speech Communication (4)

This public-speaking course emphasizes the fundamentals of extemporaneous speaking. Skill-building activities and assignments focus on research, organization, reasoning, style and delivery of presentations as well as listening and audience engagement.

ENG 220 - Research Writing: Exploring Professional Identities (4)

This is an intermediate course focusing on the composition of research papers. Students in this course prepare to be active participants in professional discourse communities by examining and practicing the writing conventions associated with their own fields of study and work. By calling attention to the conventions of disciplinary writing, the course also prepares students for upper-division college writing and the special conventions of advanced academic discourse. Course activities include three extended research papers, semi-formal writing addressing interdisciplinary communication, and readings fostering critical engagement with disciplinary conversations.

MATH 280 - Intro to Probability & Statistics (4)

This course is designed to serve students in the Computer and Information Sciences majors. The topics covered are descriptive statistics in numerical & graphical methods, probability concepts, discrete and continuous probability distributions, estimation theory, hypothesis testing, simple linear regression and correlation, and linear programming. These topics will be taught with a rigorous Algebra content and using a statistical software such as Minitab.

Technical Credit
COMP 111 - Introduction to Computer Science & Object-Oriented Programming (4)

This course provides an introduction to software construction using an object-oriented approach. The student learns and reflects on problem analysis, object-oriented design, implementation, and testing. To support the concepts and principles of software construction, the student will design, code, test, debug, and document programs using the Java programming language. Basic data types, control structures, methods, and classes are used as the building blocks for reusable software components. Automated unit testing, programming style, and industrial practice are emphasized in addition to the object-oriented techniques of abstraction, encapsulation, and composition.

OR ITEC 136 - Principles of Programming (4)

This course covers fundamental programming principles for individuals with at least some programming background. Major themes are structured programming, problem solving, algorithm design, top-down stepwise refinement, and software lifecycle. Topics will include testing, data types, operators, repetition and selection control structures, functions, arrays, and objects. Students will design, code, test, debug, and document programs in a relevant programming language.

COMP 204 - Principles of Computer Networks (2)

This course serves as an introduction to the function, design, administration, and implementation of computer networks. Topics include network infrastructure, architecture, protocols, applications, and the OSI networking model.

COMP 281 - Database Management Systems (4)

This course covers fundamental concepts necessary for the design, use, implementation and administration of database systems. The course will stress the fundamentals of database modeling and design, the languages and facilities provided by database management systems, and some techniques for implementing and administering database systems.

ISEC 200 - Cyber Security Fundamentals (2)

The Internet has changed dramatically; so have the activities that are dependent on it in some shape or form. Understanding the need for security, it's influence on people, businesses and society, as well as business drivers is critical. The course also covers malicious attacks, threats and vulnerabilities common to the world of security, as well as access controls, and methods to assess and respond to risks. Hands-on labs accompany the various concepts that are taught.

12 credits from the following types of courses:
Computer Graphics, Operating Systems, Networks, Web Design & Implementation, Multimedia Technologies, Programming, and other IT-related areas with the approval of the Program Chair.

If transferring credits into Franklin, students must have credits in the following disciplines: Programming Fundamentals Course (4), Database Fundamentals Course (4), Network Fundamentals Course (2), Cybersecurity Fundamentals Course (2).

Major Area Required
ISEC 300 - Information Assurance (4)

In a highly connected, data intensive, and cost-focused business environment, the practice of information security not a business advantage; it is a customer requirement. Viruses, malware, trojans, denial of service attacks, phishing, and even Wiki leaks have become headline news. Failure to insure the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of data costs companies millions, if not billions of dollars in legal settlements, lost business, and trade secrets. In this breadth-based course, you will get an overview of information security principles and practices, including security models, risk management, access controls, intrusion detection and prevention, cryptography, software vulnerabilities, and ethical issues. Subsequent courses expand on this foundational material in much greater depth.

ITEC 275 - Computer Networks: Switching, Routing, & Wans (4)

This course covers both the design and basic configuration of computer networks. Using Cisco Systems CCDA© certification as a guide, students will learn about the OSI model, network topologies, Wide Area Network (WAN) technologies, wireless LAN, IP addressing, routing protocols, and network security mechanisms. This course also utilizes simulation software to create a small virtual network on the student's personal computer running Windows XP or Vista. This provides the student interactive configuration experience with the Cisco Systems Internetworking Operating System (IOS) in an isolated environment.

ITEC 400 - Linux Administration (4)

This course covers the basic methods of Linux system administration. The course will focus not only on user-level commands and utilities, but also upon installation and configuration of the kernel, file system, memory, peripheral devices, authentication/authorization and network facilities. The course also provides an introduction to the Perl programming language and the role of Linux in the enterprise. This course also uses virtualization software to isolate the Linux operating system from the underlying host operating system. As such, administrative access to a late-model computer with sufficient memory and hard drive space is required.

ITEC 430 - Information Technology Project Management (4)

This course provides an introduction to the concepts of information technology project management and techniques for initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling of resources to accomplish specific project goals. Both technical and behavioral aspects of project management are discussed. While the focus is on information technology projects, the principles follow the nine project management knowledge areas outlined in the Project Management Institute's PMBOK® Guide Third Edition and thus are applicable to the management of any project. Topics will include integration, scope, time, cost, quality, human resource, communications, risk, and procurement management. Project management software utilization is emphasized.

ITEC 495 - Information Technology Capstone (4)

The Information Technology capstone course encourages teamwork in small groups on a substantial project. The intent of this course is to provide a capstone experience that integrates the material contained in required courses of the ITEC major. It also provides an opportunity for students to recognize and evaluate the interrelationship of their general education courses with the courses taken for their major. The capstone will include discussion about professional and ethical issues related to Information Technology. Students will also culminate their experiences with an overview of the evolution of computer systems and a look at the near-term future.

MIS 310 - Info Systems Architecture & Technology (4)

This course provides a conceptual survey of general systems theory followed by a conceptual and technological survey of the structure of distributed information systems architectures, operating systems, network operating systems, peripheral technology and user interfaces. Interoperability between these architectural components will be explored and current technology and trends in each architectural element will be reviewed. This course will de-emphasize, although not ignore, mainframe architectures in favor of information architectures more applicable to client/server computing. The various interacting categories of client/server computing as well as the benefits and implications of such a system will be fully explored.

ITEC 475 - Virtualization & Cloud Computing (4)

Today's organizations have come to depend on storing data and provisioning services through virtual cloud infrastructures. This course provides a broad coverage of virtualization and cloud infrastructure technologies, how this contrasts with physical data centers and the ways that organizations transition between these environments. Students plan, design, and provision cloud-based virtual desktops, documents, applications and services across multiple platforms.

Major Electives

At least 8 credits from the following courses:

ISEC 325 - Communication & Network Security (4)

Networks are the major point of entry to most computer systems. Preventing unwanted intrusion, use, abuse, or flooding of communications channels is a high priority to organizations trying to protect their assets. Network security is about preserving the appropriate use of network resources while preventing disallowed use. In this course, you will learn how to employ firewalls, VPNs, and stateful packet inspection techniques to harden computer networks. Topics include packet filtering, intrusion detection and prevention, ingress and egress rules, monitoring, network access controls, authentication, authorization, and auditing.

ISEC 350 - Security Risk Management (4)

Proper assessment, management, and mitigation of risk are essential to any information security strategy. Risks aren't just related to IT assets, but to the overall business that the IT organization is supporting, thus, business continuity planning and impact analysis is also important. In this course, you will learn how to identify and analyze risks, determine impacts, and develop plans to mitigate issues. Topics include threats, vulnerabilities, exploits, and countermeasures; US compliance laws; risk assessment and mitigation; business impact analysis; and business continuity and disaster recovery planning.

ISPM 450 - Advanced Project Management (4)

This course focuses on knowledge, understanding and skills related to building competencies in overseeing the architecture, design, and implementation of software systems. Specific topics include agile software development practices, planning and governance of large projects, identification, assessment and management of current and emerging information technologies, and the application of project management tools for software architecture, project communications, risk analysis, cost estimation and budgeting, and quality control in managing the software development life cycle.

ITEC 350 - Windows Administration (4)

This course provides the student with an introduction to Windows Server administration and is structured to assist a network manager or planner in planning, configuring, installing, running, and repairing networks that include a Windows Server. As such, it provides an introduction to server installation, Active Directory, printer management, domains, network clients, security, disaster recovery, fault/error management, and scripting of common tasks. This course uses cloud based software to provide the Windows Server operating system environment.

ITEC 450 - Database Administration (4)

This course covers a breadth of subjects in Database Administration. Building on the database management systems course, this course covers topics about the configuration, administration and performance of the database engine itself. Using Oracle 10g as a platform, students will learn about installation, configuration, performance tuning, security, disaster planning and recovery, and network connectivity of databases. This course also uses virtualization software to isolate the database server operating system from the underlying host operating system. As such, administrative access to a fast machine with at least 1 gigabyte of memory and 20 gigabytes of available hard drive space is required.

DATA 300 - Introduction to Analytics (4)

This course introduces the fundamentals of Business and Data Analytics. Students will learn the fundamentals of business problem framing, data wrangling, descriptive and inferential statistics, data visualization, and data storytelling in analytics. Not open to students with credit for INFA 300.

Other 300 or 400 level courses may be selected from Computer Science, Information Security, Information Systems, Information Technology, or Web Development upon approval of the Program Chair.

University Electives

24 credits from the following types of courses:
Any undergraduate courses offered by the University except developmental education courses.

Additional Requirements

All students are required to pass College Writing (ENG 120), and either Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121) or Learning Strategies (PF 321) prior to enrolling in any course at the 200 level or above. Students who enroll at Franklin with 30 or fewer hours of transfer credit are required to pass PF 121 Basic Learning Strategies in place of PF 321 Learning Strategies. Interpersonal Communication (COMM 150) or Speech Communication (SPCH 100) must be taken prior to enrolling in any course at the 300 level or above. Students must also meet the University algebra competency requirement.

Information Technology Degree Program Details

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Information Technology Career Opportunities

Database Administrator

Database Administrators create solutions for computer-based data storage, retrieval, management, tracking, and manipulation.

Help Desk Technical Specialist

Help Desk Technical Specialists provide technical support by troubleshooting software, hardware and system problems, answering end-user questions, and resolving problems.

IT Project Manager

IT Project Managers lead and manage a wide range of technology projects, including system installation and upgrades, security initiatives, and application development.

IT Support Generalist

IT Support Generalists provide frontline technical assistance by assisting end users in resolving desktop, printer, network, email, and operating systems issues.

Network Administrator

Network Administrators provide hardware and software technical leadership to ensure that networks function at optimal levels.

Systems Administrator

Systems Administrators plan for and oversee the installation, support, and maintenance of computer systems to ensure uptime, outage response, and issues resolution.

Web Security Administrator

Web Security Administrators oversee computer system protection plans and protocols, implementing policies and programs to ensure the integrity and security of systems and data.

Information Technology Career Outlook

12%

From 2021-2031, jobs in Information Technology are expected to increase by 12%

All Occupations

2021
5,249,961 jobs
2031
5,863,695 jobs
Show Details >

Software Developers and Software Quality Assurance Analysts and Testers

2021
1,600,098 jobs
2031
1,924,125 jobs

Computer Systems Analysts

2021
622,728 jobs
2031
677,941 jobs

Computer Occupations, All Other

2021
420,138 jobs
2031
452,283 jobs

Web Developers and Digital Interface Designers

2021
198,907 jobs
2031
222,454 jobs

Computer Systems Analysts

2021
622,728 jobs
2031
677,941 jobs

Computer and information Research Scientists

2021
33,938 jobs
2031
38,840 jobs


Source information provided by Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI).

Information Technology Knowledge & Skillsets

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Information Technology Degree Frequently Asked Questions

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