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A.S. Information Technology

Connect your skills to your ambition with an IT associate degree

From productivity to marketing to order fulfillment, organizations rely on information technology (IT) to help them successfully do -- and grow -- their businesses. 

Because IT affects business from the inside out, IT professionals have a unique opportunity to impact business from every angle, including operations. Starting with network availability and systems capacity all the way to algorithms and customer databases, technology-based information and resources are needed to maximize productivity and profitability.

Earn a two-year online A.S. Information Technology from Franklin and work with organizations to create and manage the computing systems infrastructures and applications that bring businesses closer to their customers and achieve their operational goals.
 

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Multiple IT Pathways

Enjoy a seamless transition to tech-focused bachelor's degrees.

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100% Online Classes

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Program Overview

Determine your IT path

Franklin’s transfer-friendly A.S. Information Technology associate degree program covers the fundamentals of technology-based problem solving, including programming, configuring computer networks, cyber security and administering database systems.

With our program, you’ll be well-prepared to tackle a wide variety of technology challenges, including troubleshooting network performance, using algorithms to solve problems, and resolving database and distributed data performance and capacity issues.

Through 64 core, major and elective credit hours, you’ll be introduced to the concepts and technologies that enable businesses to leverage information technology to profitable advantage.

You’ll also be exposed to several different IT career pathways, from help desk and support to analyst and technician to better prepare you to make entry into the fast-growing career segment of information technology. In fact, EMSI predicts that jobs in the information technology sector will increase a whopping 24 percent through 2025. 

Once you complete your associate degree, aside from a variety of career options, you’ll have a multitude of next-step education options too. If programming and web development are your thing, then your IT associate degree can prepare you to transfer to our Web Development bachelor’s degree program. If you’d like to make a career of protecting data from security threats and hackers, then consider your IT associate degree a good springboard to the Cyber Security bachelor’s degree program. If you’d rather become an IT generalist and continue with your bachelor’s degree, all your associate degree courses are directly applicable to the Information Technology bachelor’s degree program at Franklin.

Earn your degree from a university built for busy adults

Earn your degree on your terms by taking classes 100% online or pursue available coursework at one of our Midwest locations. Regionally accredited and nonprofit, Franklin was built from the ground-up to satisfy the needs of adult learners. Our seamless transfer process and team of academic advisors will help ease your transition to becoming a student, while our flexible course schedules help to balance your education with work, family, and life. Get started on your future today.

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Curriculum & Course Descriptions

64 Semester Hours
Fundamental General Education Core (24 hours)
English Composition

Choose a minimum of 3 semester hours from:

WRIT 120 - COLLEGE WRITING (4)
In this course, students acquire the writing competence necessary for conducting and presenting research. A variety of assignments, beginning with personal reflections, build upon one another, as students develop ideas that respond to, critique, and synthesize the positions of others. Students systematize and organize knowledge in ways that will help them in all of their courses. The course also emphasizes the elements of good writing style, appropriate grammar and mechanics, clarity of language, and logical and cohesive development. It culminates in submission of a documented research paper.

*If the course does not have a research paper component, WRIT 130 Research Paper, two semester credits, is also required.

Mathematics

Choose a minimum of three semester hours from:

MATH 160 - COLLEGE ALGEBRA (4)
This course is designed to prepare students for Applied Calculus and Discrete Mathematics and to provide the mathematical background needed for the analytic reasoning used in other courses. Topics include functions and their graphs, including exponential and logarithmic functions; complex numbers; systems of equations and inequalities; matrices; basic principles of counting and probability; and other selected topics.

Choose MATH 150 Fundamental Algebra as the prerequisite. This course can count as a general education or University elective.

*at least one mathematics or statistics course beyond the level of intermediate algebra.

Sciences

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

SCIE 210 - UNDERSTANDING SCIENCE: PRINCIPLES, PRACTICE, & THEORY (2)
Understanding Science: Principles, Practice & Theory is a two credit hour course that introduces students to the major themes, processes, and methods common to all scientific disciplines. Students will develop critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate all kinds of phenomena, scientific, pseudoscientific, and other. The focus is on the nature of science so students will develop an understanding of how science works and develop an appreciation for the process by which we gain scientific knowledge.
SCIE 211 - INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC ANALYSIS & REASONING (4)
Introduction to Scientific Analysis and Reasoning is a four credit hour course consisting of three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of laboratory. This course is an introduction to critical thinking on statistical and scientific claims. The student will develop the critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate popular sources of (mis)information and to better understand and evaluate all sorts of scientific claims and arguments. The focus of the course is on students developing thoughtful and critical use of scientific information and research to be able to separate truth from deception and make decisions that affect their personal lives and roles as informed and engaged citizens.

*Two science courses, with one having a laboratory component.

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

  • Choose coursework from the Anthropology, Economics, Psychology, and Sociology disciplines, or PUAD 295 American Government in Action.

*The six semester hours must come from at least two different disciplines

Arts and Humanities

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

HUMN 211 - INTRO TO ETHICAL ANALYSIS AND REASONING (2)
The goal of this course is to help you improve your ethical analysis and reasoning skills. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing ethical arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. In this course, you will discover how to apply the following questions to your job and everyday life. Why do we need ethics if we have laws to govern our behavior' Does the majority view determine what is ethical and what is not' Are feelings, desires, and preferences reliable ethical guides' Is it ever appropriate to criticize another individual's (or culture's) ethical judgment' Are people always responsible for their actions' Do human beings have a natural tendency to good, a natural tendency to evil' both' neither' Is there a single moral code that is binding on all people, at all times, and in all places'
  • Choose additional coursework from the Humanities discipline.

Additional General Education Requirements (12 hours)
COMM 315 - COMMUNICATION ETHICS (4)
This course examines the strategies involved in effective, ethical communication in professional contexts. Students examine principles of ethical organizational communication and the temporal/cultural/social forces behind those principles, as well as apply reasoning and critical thinking in individual and group assignments. Comparing values and perspectives from diverse cultures, students will respond to cases in an intercultural professional environment. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
PF 321 - LEARNING STRATEGIES (2)
This course prepares students to be successful lifelong learners both academically and in their chosen careers. Franklin courses require a high level of self-directed learning and focus on skills required in the workplace and the classroom that are easily transferable between the two environments. The course includes strategies for advancing communication skills, including the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments. The assignments and activities in the course are created to closely simulate teamwork found in the workplace.
COMM 150 - INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION (4)
By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
OR SPCH 100 - SPEECH COMMUNICATION (4)
A basic public speaking course intended to improve the student's ability to think critically and to communicate orally. Theory and practice are provided in various speaking situations. Each student is required to speak before an audience, but class work also involves reading, gathering and organizing information, writing and listening.

General Education Elective (6)

University Electives (4 hours)

Any undergraduate courses offered by the University except developmental education courses.

Major Area (24 hours)
COMP 101 - PROBLEM SOLVING WITH COMPUTING (2)
Many organizations today utilize computers and information systems to store, organize, analyze, and summarize data to solve problems. As a result, computing is a tool that can benefit students in many different fields. At the heart of solving problems with computers is the study of structured thinking using algorithms. This course is designed for students with no prior programming experience and teaches the building blocks of algorithms, including variables, expressions, selection and repetition structures, functions and parameters, and array processing.
COMP 204 - PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER NETWORKS (2)
This course serves as an introduction to the function, design, administration, and implementation of computer networks. Topics include network infrastructure, architecture, protocols, applications, and the OSI networking model.
COMP 281 - DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (4)
This course covers fundamental concepts necessary for the design, use, implementation and administration of database systems. The course will stress the fundamentals of database modeling and design, the languages and facilities provided by database management systems, and some techniques for implementing and administering database systems. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
ISEC 200 - CYBER SECURITY FUNDAMENTALS (2)
The Internet has changed dramatically; so have the activities that are dependent on it in some shape or form. Understanding the need for security, it's influence on people, businesses and society, as well as business drivers is critical. The course also covers malicious attacks, threats and vulnerabilities common to the world of security, as well as access controls, and methods to assess and respond to risks. Hands-on labs accompany the various concepts that are taught.
ITEC 136 - PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING (4)
This course covers fundamental programming principles for individuals with at least some programming background. Major themes are structured programming, problem solving, algorithm design, top-down stepwise refinement, and software lifecycle. Topics will include testing, data types, operators, repetition and selection control structures, functions, arrays, and objects. Students will design, code, test, debug, and document programs in a relevant programming language. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
ITEC 275 - COMPUTER NETWORKS: SWITCHING, ROUTING, & WANS (4)
This course covers both the design and basic configuration of computer networks. Using Cisco Systems CCDA© certification as a guide, students will learn about the OSI model, network topologies, Wide Area Network (WAN) technologies, wireless LAN, IP addressing, routing protocols, and network security mechanisms. This course also utilizes simulation software to create a small virtual network on the student's personal computer running Windows XP or Vista. This provides the student interactive configuration experience with the Cisco Systems Internetworking Operating System (IOS) in an isolated environment. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
MIS 200 - MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (4)
The purpose of this course is to provide the fundamentals associated with the management of information technology in a business enterprise. These fundamentals are business concepts in which the influence of information technology has caused change or brought about new concepts. Special emphasis will be placed on understanding the managerial issues that are relevant to usage of computers. The student will be given problems isolating these issues and will be asked to propose solutions with alternatives.
WEBD 101 - INTRODUCTION TO WEB PAGE CONSTRUCTION (2)
This course covers the fundamental concepts necessary for the construction of web pages using the basic building blocks of Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (css). HTML and XHTML are covered in detail for building web pages using a web page development environment. The use of styling using css is introduced.
Additional Requirements

All students are required to pass College Writing (WRIT 120), either Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121) or Learning Strategies (PF 321) and either Speech Communication (SPCH 100) or Interpersonal Communication (COMM 150) prior to enrolling in any other course at the 200 level or above. Either PF 121 or PF 321 must be taken prior to the first BLF course, or it may be taken concurrently with the first 15-week BLF course. Students who enroll at Franklin with 30 or fewer hours of transfer credit are required to pass Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121) in place of Learning Strategies (PF 321). Students must also meet the University algebra competency requirement.

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Program Details

Career Opportunities

IT Specialist

IT specialists help support the execution and monitoring of technology-related projects, such as software development, installations, upgrades and migrations.

Security Specialist

Security specialists assist in identifying, analyzing, managing and mitigating information technology risks, threats and vulnerabilities.
 

Technical Support Specialist

Technical support specialists provide computer equipment support, ranging from installing and testing hardware and software to training end users.

Help Desk Specialist

Help desk specialists log, track and respond to information technology support requests, especially hardware- and/or software-related issues.

Network Specialist

Network specialists assist in troubleshooting and mitigating network problems, as well as resolving operational issues and restoring services.

Frequently Asked Questions

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