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Minors

Augment your skills with a minor

Customize your degree by taking additional courses of interest, known as a minor, as part of your academic program.

What is a minor and, more importantly, what can it do for you?

Minors are additional courses outside of your major field of study. They usually enhance your major in some way, such as allowing you to develop special expertise within your field; or they allow you to add a new skillset to complement the ones you’re already acquiring within your major.

For example, an accounting major may want to minor in business economics to secure a more segmented economics job in the field. Or, an information systems major may want to minor in communication in order to become a better presenter. The additional qualifications as a result of taking minor courses may lead to new opportunities and future advancement.

And because you choose your minor based on your interests, your degree becomes completely unique to you. There’s no limit to how many minors you can have, though, with careful planning, you may be able to complete your minor as part of your required degree program hours.

Minors

 

    Accounting (16 hours)

    Accounting is often referred to as the “language of business.” As such, the Accounting minor is designed to augment a student’s skill set for non-accounting-related business fields, including business administration and management. The knowledge obtained in this minor builds on core accounting courses with additional upper-level courses that cover both technical and theoretical accounting skills, preparing students to meet the opportunities and challenges of advanced positions.

    The educational objectives of the Accounting minor are to enable a student to:

    • Evaluate contemporary financial accounting issues
    • Analyze federal income tax issues
    • Analyze information systems through evaluation of process controls and organizational system risks within a business process
    ACCT 310 - Intermediate Accounting I (4)
    The first of two in-depth financial accounting courses. Theory, the conceptual framework, development of generally accepted accounting principles, and applications are stressed. Topics include the income statement, the statement of cash flows and the balance sheet, specifically asset accounts.
    ACCT 320 - Intermediate Accounting II (4)
    The second of two in-depth financial accounting courses. Theory, concepts and applications are stressed. Topics include time value of money, current and non-current liabilities, leases, deferred taxes, retirement benefits, stockholders, equity, earning per share, accounting changes and errors, and statement of cash flows.
    ACCT 390 - Federal Income Tax I (4)
    An introduction to the federal income tax structure with emphasis on the individual taxpayer, including employee, sole proprietor and investor. This course also provides exposure to basic concepts that apply equally, or with slight modification, to taxpayers other than individuals. Major topics include filing status, exemptions, excludable and includable income, business and non-business deductions, disallowances, technical tax research, and computer problem applications.
    ACCT 425 - Accounting Information Systems (4)
    This course creates a framework for accounting information systems by combining knowledge about business as it relates to information systems, information technology, and accounting. Students will examine the REA enterprise ontology as it relates to databases which can be used to store and retrieve information for decision-making within an organization. Students learn that in the competitive organizations of today, and tomorrow, accountants cannot simply prepare and report information; they must take a more active role in understanding and creating systems and processes that impact the organization's bottom line. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
    Business Economics (16 hours)

    The Business Economics minor is designed to provide insights into the decision-making process to non-economics majors. Solid understanding of basic economic principles of opportunity cost, scarcity, diminishing returns, and gains from trade enables graduates to successfully compete in a global economy. Tools of economic analysis and “economic way of thinking” provide an essential foundation for forming business strategy. Acquired useful transferrable skills make the graduates with training in Business Economics valuable members of governmental and business organizations, successful entrepreneurs, and knowledgeable decision-makers.

    The educational objectives of the Business Economics minor are to enable a student to:

    • Evaluate financial and non-financial data for decision-making
    • Analyze ethical issues in economic policies and regulations
    • Analyze current economic issues
    ECON 321 - Intermediate Microeconomics (4)
    This course provides a further examination of profit maximizing strategies by firms and individuals. Evaluation of consumer behavior, firms' production decisions, and market power are at the core of the analysis. Special attention is given to the asymmetric information considerations, game theory, and externalities.
    ECON 322 - Intermediate Macroeconomics (4)
    This course examines the differences between the economy in the short run and in the long run. A number of macroeconomic models are considered, and the results are used to conduct macroeconomic policy discussion on stabilization policies and government debt.

    And choose two of the following:

    ECON 340 - Money, Banking, & Financial Markets (4)
    This course provides an overview of the financial system. The roles of money, financial intermediaries, financial markets, and central banks are discussed in the context of global economy.
    ECON 420 - Forecasting (4)
    This course provides a hands-on experience for creating working econometric models to forecast business activities, including revenues, costs, and profits. Trends, seasonal and cyclical fluctuations, as well as error term dynamics, are analyzed.
    ECON 450 - History of Economic Thought (4)
    This course provides a broad introduction to the development of economic thought through time. The ideas and concepts are considered in their historical perspective. Contributions by leading economists, emergence of a variety of schools of economic thought, their relevance to the current economic problems constitute the core of the analysis.
    Business Forensics (16 hours)

    The detection and deterrence of fraud in the workplace is a management responsibility that crosses all industries. To gain the knowledge necessary to fulfill this requirement, a student who minors in Business Forensics will learn the foundational skills needed to properly assist in the investigation, detection, documentation, and prevention of business fraud. The wide applicability of these specialized skills to all aspects of the business life cycle makes this minor a relevant addition to a manager’s expertise.

    The educational objectives of the Business Forensics minor are to enable a student to:

    • Detect business fraud using technical, analytical, and problem-solving skills
    • Determine the internal controls needed to help prevent business fraud
    • Demonstrate written and oral communication skills in fraud investigation and reporting
    BSFR 341 - Fraud Examination (4)
    This course provides an overview of the behavioral research associated with occupational fraud and the methodology of fraud examination (i.e., obtaining documentary evidence, interviewing witnesses and potential suspects, writing investigative reports, testifying to findings, and forensic document examination). The majority of the course is focused on detecting the most common types of occupational fraud, determining how each type of fraud is committed, and implementing prevention strategies.
    BSFR 342 - Interviewing Techniques for Fraud Invest (4)
    This course provides an overview of techniques and strategies useful in interviewing and interrogating occupational fraud suspects and other parties of interest. These techniques and strategies include interpreting the verbal and nonverbal cues of an interviewee, as well as planning, conducting, and documenting the findings from investigative interviews.
    BSFR 343 - Legal Elements of Fraud (4)
    This course explores the legal issues associated with occupational fraud investigations with a primary emphasis on the proper preparation of a fraud report. Related topics addressed include analyzing relevant criminal and civil laws, the rights of the parties involved in an investigation, rules of evidence, and expert witnessing.
    BSFR 344 - Corp Gvrnc/Intrnl Control Assessment (4)
    This course starts with an overview of key legislation and guidelines associated with corporate governance. This includes analyzing the components of the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations' (COSO) internal control framework, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, Statement on Auditing Standards (SAS) No. 99, and the role of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB). However, the primary focus of the course is on identifying, documenting, analyzing, and testing internal controls in an organization as part of an effective fraud prevention program.
    Communications (16 hours)

    Effective written and verbal communication is vital to success in the workplace. Franklin’s Communications minor provides an enriching complement to any major, but is especially useful for business, finance, public relations, marketing, and human resources students interested in running a small to medium-sized business and provides a strong compliment to a Public Relations, Marketing, or Human Resources major. Top managers in smaller organizations need to be skilled communicators in order to engage and retain quality employees. This minor enables students
    to gain the confidence, skills, and knowledge necessary to structure and manage communication in a variety of professional settings.

    The educational objectives of the Communications minor will enable a student to:

    • Examine the role of communication in various situations
    • Apply principles of communication in various contexts
    • Evaluate communication opportunities
    • Formulate effective communication strategies
    COMM 315 - Communication Ethics (4)
    This course examines the strategies involved in effective, ethical communication in professional contexts. Students examine principles of ethical organizational communication and the temporal/cultural/social forces behind those principles, as well as apply reasoning and critical thinking in individual and group assignments. Comparing values and perspectives from diverse cultures, students will respond to cases in an intercultural professional environment. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
    COMM 321 - Organizational Communication (4)
    The course examines the role of communication in organizations. Students will learn the major theories of organizational communication, identifying and defining primary concepts, and applying them to discussions of real-world situations. The role of technology, corporate culture, leadership, teamwork, ethics, and diversity in communication is examined. Effective communication in global organizations and critiques of organization communication systems and structures are also presented.
    COMM 335 - Communication in Groups and Teams (4)
    The course examines current theories and best practices of working collaboratively in professional contexts. Students apply these concepts to analyze their own work experience, generating strategies for how to improve their performance in work groups. Students will learn basic project management skills and work in online virtual teams to complete a final communication project.
    COMM 400 - Intercultural Communication (4)
    This course provides an overview of issues, processes, and theories involved with communicating with individuals from different cultures. Topics include thinking and communicating in global contexts and professional relationships in diverse environments.
    Criminal Justice Administration (16 hours)

    The minor in Criminal Justice Administration (CJAD) was developed to offer selected CJAD courses to individuals who may have an interest in criminal justice as an additional area of study. The minor in CJAD may be of particular interest to students who are employed, or who seek to be employed, by a public safety agency in a non-sworn (civilian) capacity. The CJAD minor may also be of interest to students in business degree programs who work with private sector agencies that interact with agencies in the criminal justice system. The minor in CJAD provides an opportunity for personnel who are not directly involved with the criminal justice system to increase the scope of their knowledge, skills, and abilities in the area of criminal justice administration.

    The educational objectives of the minor in criminal justice are to enable graduates to:

    • Explain the purpose and function of the correctional system in the U.S.
    • Describe the purpose and function of the courts system in the U.S.
    • Compare and contrast theories of crime and offending that are commonly accepted in the field of criminal justice
    • Apply critical thinking, reasoning, and analytical skills required for ethical decision-making and problem solving in criminal justice
    • Apply management, administrative, and leadership skills appropriate to a criminal justice agency
    CJAD 210 - Intro to Criminal Justice Administration (4)
    This is an introductory course designed to expose students to the various Major elements of the criminal justice system (police, courts, and corrections). Students will learn about the ways in which the various systems interact, the processing of offenders, the various forms of punishment and the alternatives to punishment. The future of the criminal justice system will also be discussed.
    CJAD 240 - Introduction to Criminology (4)
    This course will focus on theories of crime and types of offending. Topics related the causation, control and prevention of criminal behavior will be addressed in this course.

    and two of the following:

    CJAD 310 - Courts and Criminal Procedure (4)
    This course addresses the requirements for processing criminal offenders through the court system. Topics include structure of the court system in the U.S., evidentiary standards, constitutional protections, the role and importance of case law, and the role of the prosecutor and defense attorney in the courts.
    CJAD 315 - Policing in America (4)
    This course will provide the student with an overview of the philosophy and history of policing in America. Students will learn about personnel and management issues related to policing. Students will also be exposed to topics including police discretion, police use of force, civil liability, police culture, and the impact of the war on terrorism on police operations and practices.
    CJAD 320 - Corrections in America (4)
    This course considers contemporary corrections in America. This course will include a review of recent corrections-related research and a discussion of the role corrections plays in the criminal justice system. Topics covered will include a historical overview of corrections in America, alternatives to incarceration, types and functions of various prison systems in corrections, and various categories of inmates within the corrections system.
    CJAD 330 - Juvenile Justice & Delinquency (4)
    This course will address the history of the U.S. juvenile justice system and the nature and extent of youth crime. It will focus on the correlates and theoretical perspectives used to explain juvenile delinquency all within a framework of current research and strategies used to prevent, treat, and control youth crime. Students will analyze and apply these concepts to the structure within which juveniles are taken into custody, treated, processed, rehabilitated or punished in an integrated and collaborative environment. Finally, students will examine basic criminal justice research methods and the role of science and inquiry in criminal justice.
    CJAD 450 - Criminal Justice Management & Admin (4)
    This course will examine the basic concepts of management and administration as applied to agencies in the criminal justice system. Emphasis will be placed on issues related to the effective management and administration of criminal justice agencies. Topics covered will include environmental influence; conflict, power, and ethical issues; motivation, leadership, and communication. The concept of the service quality approach will also be considered.
    CJAD 455 - Ethics in the Criminal Justice System (4)
    This course will address the topics of ethical and moral values as they pertain to the criminal justice system. Topics covered will include ethics and the police, racial discrimination in the criminal justice system, the purpose of punishment, ethics in corrections, and the ethics of criminal justice policy making.
    Digital Marketing (17 hours)

    In many organizations, employees are called upon to perform a wide variety of activities, including Internet application and other technology-dependent activities. The Digital Marketing minor is designed for students who wish to complement their current expertise or major with the knowledge, skills, and abilities of a marketing generalist. This minor helps develop proficiency in the areas of graphic design, Web authoring, Internet marketing, and eCommerce.

    The educational objectives of the Digital Marketing minor are to enable a student to:

    • Plan and develop websites in support of an organization’s marketing objectives
    • Apply principles of graphic design to Internet-based marketing activities
    • Evaluate and respond to the implications of eCommerce for an organization
    COMM 107 - Intro to Web Presentation & Publishing (1)
    This course is an introduction to the use of Open Source Content Management Systems (CMS) for creating Web sites. It will provide students with the basic knowledge required to design, build, and maintain an informational Web site.
    MKTG 340 - Digital Marketing (4)
    Common strategies for the marketing of goods and services via the Internet range from public relations and corporate communications to advertising and electronic commerce. Students investigate and evaluate various marketing and communication strategies and tactics for the World Wide Web. Emphasis is placed on critical evaluation skills as well as website planning, development, design, and other factors which contribute to a website's success. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
    MKTG 345 - Social Media Marketing (4)
    In this course students will explore and utilize techniques for integrating social media marketing as an integral component of marketing campaigns, serving as listening and outreach tools for building brand awareness and promoting business. Through an investigation of tools which include internet forums, message boards, blogs, wikis, podcasts, picture sharing, video sharing, and social networking, students will have the opportunity to create and present a written plan for achieving business goals through the use of a social media marketing campaign.
    MKTG 415 - Search Engine Marketing (4)
    In this course students will use search engine optimization to evaluate the processes that bring websites to the top. It will also show students how to choose the best keywords and phrases to target and how to monitor and maintain successful search engine rankings for those keywords.
    MKTG 435 - Digital Marketing Analytics (4)
    In this course, students will learn how to quantifiably measure and define client interaction through web analytics. Successful companies today are leveraging the power of web analytics to realize the full potential of their websites, and are able to develop and maintain client relationships that create measurable value to business. In this course students will be introduced to key concepts, tools, techniques, and practices of web analytics. Students will understand how web analytics can drive higher profits and improve the customer experience.
    Emergency Management & Homeland Security (16 hours)

    The minor in Emergency Management & Homeland Security (SEMT) was developed to offer major area SEMT courses to individuals who may have an interest in safety, security, and emergency management as an additional area of study. The minor in SEMT may be of particular interest to students who are employed by an Emergency Management, Homeland Security, or public safety agency in a non-sworn (civilian) capacity. Most Emergency Management, Homeland Security, and public safety agencies employ significant numbers of civilian employees in
    local, state, and federal agencies to support the sworn personnel in those agencies. The minor in SEMT provides an opportunity for non-sworn Emergency Management, Homeland Security, and public safety employees to increase the scope of their knowledge, skills, and abilities in the area of emergency management and homeland security.

    The educational objectives of the Emergency Management & Homeland Security minor are to enable a student to:

    • Apply principles of basic accounting, fiscal management, and budgeting appropriate to safety, security, and emergency management agencies
    • Apply appropriate ethical principles, laws, and human relations skills to all applicable areas of operations in safety, security, and emergency management agencies
    • Analyze the functions and interactions of various safety, security, and emergency management agencies
    • Evaluate the unique roles and challenges faced by safety, security, and emergency management agencies
    SEMT 322 - Ethics & Leadership in Public Safety Agencies (4)
    This course will study ethics and leadership theories in the context of public safety agencies. Consideration of leadership skills and traits in both the strategic and tactical settings will be considered. Ethics will be considered in terms of creating a culture of ethics within a public safety agency.
    SEMT 328 - Emergency Management Theory & Practice (4)
    This course will focus on Emergency Management and Homeland Security in the Post 9-11 era. Emphasis will be on mitigation and preparedness related to international and domestic terrorism as well as natural disasters.
    SEMT 335 - Introduction to Emergency Management & Homeland Security (4)
    This course analyzes emergency management from a historical perspective. Disaster planning and disaster management in the post 9-11 environment are analyzed. The impact of Homeland Security on local public safety agencies is examined as are selected Homeland Security Presidential Directives (HSPD #5 and HSPD #11 in particular). The National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the National Response Plan (NRP) are examined with regard to their impact on local public safety agencies. Finally, special challenges for emergency management and disaster response will be analyzed.
    SEMT 432 - Homeland Security: Theory & Practice At The Local Level (4)
    This course will study the impact of Department of Homeland Security requirements on local public safety agencies. Focus will be on interoperability as it relates to planning and responding to terrorist threats or actions at the local level.
    Financial Management (16 hours)

    Because financial considerations are of significant element in all types of organizational decision making, Franklin’s Financial Management minor is a natural complement to other business disciplines. This minor is designed to provide students with an understanding of finance beyond that achieved through the principles course in the business core, providing them with more in-depth knowledge of the financial system, corporate finance, and investments.

    The educational objectives of the Financial Management minor are to enable a student to:

    • Calculate the value of market securities using bond and stock valuation models
    • Analyze financial statements and documentation. Apply cost of capital and budgeting tools to the evaluation of investment projects
    • Construct investment portfolios based on the criteria of risk and return
    FINA 340 - Money, Banking, & Financial Markets (4)
    This course provides an overview of the financial system. The roles of money, financial intermediaries, financial markets, and central banks are discussed in the context of global economy.
    FINA 403 - Advanced Financial Management (4)
    An introduction to advanced concepts and methods of financial management. Topics include risk and return, asset evaluation, capital budgeting, capital structure, business financial planning and working capital management.
    FINA 405 - Investments (4)
    An examination of investment markets, transactions, planning and information. Topics include investment risk and return measures, debt and equity instruments, evaluation techniques, hybrid and derivative securities, mutual funds, real estate investments, tax planning and the investment process, and portfolio management.
    FINA 450 - Global Finance (4)
    An examination of financial management in the global economy. Topics include international financial markets, exchange rates, interest rates and inflation, exchange rate risk management, working capital management, capital budgeting, country risk analysis, long-term financing, and global strategic planning.
    Fire & Emergency Services Administration (16 hours)

    Fire & Emergency Services is an area of study that includes a wide variety of disciplines involved in the preservation and maintenance of social order in society. The Fire & Emergency Services curriculum, based on the Fire & Emergency Services Higher Education model, is designed to prepare students for further academic study or for careers in Fire and Emergency Services.

    The educational objectives of the Fire & Emergency Services minor are to enable a student to:

    • Select and apply the appropriate statistical and quantitative tools and techniques of analytical decision-making in the context of the Fire and Emergency Services agencies
    • Apply critical thinking, reasoning, and analytical skills required for ethical decision-making and problem solving in Fire and Emergency Services
    • Demonstrate knowledge of ethical principles, laws and standards of professional conduct applicable to the Fire and Emergency Services system
    • Apply management and administration skills appropriate to a Fire and Emergency Services agency.
    FIES 310 - Fire & Emergency Services Administration Administration (4)
    This course is designed to be a progressive primer for students who want more knowledge about fire and emergency services administration. The course demonstrates the importance of the following skills, necessary to manage and lead a fire and emergency services department through the challenges and changes of the 21st century: persuasion and influence, accountable budgeting, anticipation of challenges and the need for change, and using specific management tools for analyzing and solving problems. A central part of the course focuses on how the leadership of a fire and emergency services department develops internal and external cooperation to create a coordinated approach to achieving the department's mission.
    FIES 330 - Hr Management for the Fire & Emergency Services (4)
    This course examines relationships and issues in personnel administration and human resource development within the context of fire-related organizations, including personnel management, organizational development, productivity, recruitment and selection, performance management systems, discipline, and collective bargaining.
    FIES 430 - Political & Legal Foundations for Fire Protection (4)
    This course examines the legal aspects of the fire services and the political and social impacts of legal issues. This course includes a review of the American legal system and in-depth coverage of legal and political issues involving employment and personnel matters, administrative and operational matters, planning and code enforcement, and legislative and political processes with regard to the fire services.
    FIES 450 - Applications of Fire Research (4)
    This course examines the basic principles of research and methodology for analyzing current fire-related research. The course also provides a framework for conducting and evaluating independent research in the following areas: fire dynamics, fire test standards and codes, fire safety, fire modeling, structural fire safety, life safety, firefighter health and safety, automatic detection and suppression, transportation fire hazards, risk analysis and loss control, fire service applied research and new trends in fire-related research.
    Global Business (16 hours)

    In order to fully understand and successfully navigate in the 21st century-business environment, professionals will need to broaden their perspectives and adaptability. The minor in Global Business is designed to help students update their understanding of cultures and practices around the world, allowing them to strengthen the value of their primary degree with increased tolerance, communication skills, and marketability.

    The educational objectives of the Global Business minor are to enable a student to:

    • Identify current global issues and market trends
    • Communicate appropriately for a range of purposes and audiences
    • Explore ethnocentrism and the nature and function of culture
    • Evaluate how businesses adjust to cultural differences in developing a global strategy
    BSAD 476 - Global Business Issues (4)
    This course focuses on global economic integration and emerging market economies and the effects these trends have on both service and manufacturing industries in the short- and long-term. Other global business issues will include: the European Union (EU), North American Free Trade Association (NAFTA), and the World Trade Organization (WTO); environmental considerations in business operations; the influences of the political and legal environment on markets; the strategies for business entry into a global market; and the development of leadership talent in a global setting.
    HUMN 305 - Global Issues (4)
    This course provides students with a coherent sense of the past and present human societies drawn from five cultural areas: Asia, Africa, Europe, North America and South America. It also reviews the diversity of traditions that have formed the world and continue to interact in it today. Through the synthesis of connections, influences and parallels among cultures, students will gain an understanding of how to communicate in a culturally diverse world.

    and choose two of the following:

    ANTH 215 - Cultural Anthropology (4)
    This course exposes students to the principles, concepts, research methods, and applications of cultural anthropology. Students will be introduced to the wide range of variation in social and institutional arrangements found historically and cross-culturally. From language to gender roles, from bases of social stratification to causes and consequences of conformity, from the simpler life in foraging societies to the seeming-chaos in modern post-industrial societies: students will examine the enormous variation in solutions to the requisites of social life.
    COMM 400 - Intercultural Communication (4)
    This course provides an overview of issues, processes, and theories involved with communicating with individuals from different cultures. Topics include thinking and communicating in global contexts and professional relationships in diverse environments.
    FINA 450 - Global Finance (4)
    An examination of financial management in the global economy. Topics include international financial markets, exchange rates, interest rates and inflation, exchange rate risk management, working capital management, capital budgeting, country risk analysis, long-term financing, and global strategic planning.
    HUMN 218 - World Religions (4)
    A comparative study of the founders, sacred writings, beliefs and practices of some of the major world religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Islam, Judaism and Christianity. This course enables the student to study and compare the leading religions of the world in light of their historical and cultural backgrounds. Students will be encouraged to explore faith traditions other than their own. Common themes across religions, spiritual practice, and current related cultural and political issues will also be considered.
    HUMN 405 - Study Abroad: Developing a Global World View (4)
    Designed to help develop skills and perspectives in the international arena, this course will provide students the opportunity to do research, travel, and then apply knowledge gained. Additionally, it will assist students in developing professional experiences in another country and then capitalizing on their learning experience once they return home. General intercultural communication techniques will be integrated into class discussion. The travel experience, which will have an added cost, will be between one and two weeks.
    MKTG 450 - Global Marketing (4)
    A course in marketing theory and methods as they apply to world markets. Among the topics discussed are: the importance of linking international marketing with the overall strategy of the business while examining the impact of cultural, political and legal issues and the economic differences in global strategies. Emphasis is placed on developing the marketing mix appropriate to various international global environments.
    Healthcare & Society (16 hours)

    The minor in Healthcare & Society was developed to offer selected major area Healthcare Management courses to individuals who may have an interest in healthcare management. The minor in Healthcare & Society may be of interest to students who are employed, or who are seeking employment in, a healthcare setting or a related discipline. Those interested in pursuing a career in healthcare management may want to enroll in the Healthcare Management major. The healthcare industry is one of the fastest growing fields with an increasing demand for qualified personnel to support the delivery of health care services in the community. The minor in Healthcare & Society provides individuals with the opportunity to gain an appreciation of the role healthcare plays in our society as well as an understanding and skill set to successfully function in the healthcare environment.

    The educational objectives of the Healthcare & Society minor are to enable a student to:

    • Demonstrate the ability to interpret financial data and apply financial concepts in solving problems related to healthcare organizations
    • Demonstrate the ability to apply legal and ethical reasoning principles in resolving significant patient issues confronted by health services administrators
    • Illustrate how the social, political, and economic environment in the United States impacts the health services delivery system

    •  
    HCM 300 - Healthcare Management (4)
    This course provides students with an overview of concepts and issues related to healthcare leadership. It is generally a required course for any subsequent healthcare management courses. Through the examination of management topics and healthcare situations, the student will explore the skills and knowledge needed to be successful in a diverse healthcare environment. Topics include healthcare leadership, organizational design as it relates to the uniqueness of healthcare organizations, managing professionals, and diversity in the workplace.
    HCM 340 - Community Health (4)
    Declining reimbursement impacts the role healthcare organizations play in community health and disease prevention. This course focuses on specific strategies healthcare managers can use to benefit the health of communities. Topics include the role of healthcare stakeholders in promoting community health, connecting with the community, and community benefit standards.
    HCM 442 - Legal Aspects of Healthcare Management (4)
    Individuals in the healthcare industry face ever changing legal and ethical trends in their environment. Practitioners, therefore, need to develop specific skills to evolve into the role of a change agent in order to manage these trends. This course will provide the student with the skills necessary to mitigate liability through risk management principles, develop relationship management skills, apply an ethical decision-making framework, incorporate employment law procedures, and manage communication.
    HCM 472 - Contemporary Issues in Healthcare Mgmt (4)
    This is an issues oriented course that examines the healthcare delivery system in the United States. The course examines the entire continuum of care and uses the construct of a fully integrated system as a means to evaluate the current system to develop recommendations for further developments. Our intent is to identify the key issues confronting healthcare today, examine the causes and develop reasonable solutions to the current set of problems.
    Healthcare Management (16 hours)

    The minor in Healthcare Management was developed to offer selected major area Healthcare Management courses to individuals who have an interest in healthcare management or are interested in pursuing another major such as Healthcare Information Systems Management, or Business Administration. The minor in Healthcare Management, like the minor in Healthcare and Society, may be of interest to students who are employed, or seek to be employed, in a healthcare setting or related discipline. Those interested in pursuing a career in healthcare management degree may want to enroll in the Healthcare Management major. The healthcare industry is one of the fastest growing fields with an increasing demand for qualified personnel to support the delivery of health care services to an expanding population. The minor in Healthcare Management provides the individual with the opportunity to gain insight into the operational
    issues and opportunities facing today’s healthcare organizations.

    The educational objectives of the Healthcare Management minor are to enable a student to:

    • Demonstrate the ability to interpret financial data and apply financial concepts in solving problems related to healthcare organizations
    • Demonstrate the ability to apply legal and ethical reasoning principles in resolving significant patient issues confronted by health services administrators
    • Synthesize management and organizational theory in a healthcare environment
    HCM 300 - Healthcare Management (4)
    This course provides students with an overview of concepts and issues related to healthcare leadership. It is generally a required course for any subsequent healthcare management courses. Through the examination of management topics and healthcare situations, the student will explore the skills and knowledge needed to be successful in a diverse healthcare environment. Topics include healthcare leadership, organizational design as it relates to the uniqueness of healthcare organizations, managing professionals, and diversity in the workplace.
    HCM 320 - Healthcare Financial Management I (4)
    This is the first of two healthcare finance courses. Healthcare Financial Management I begins with an introduction to healthcare finance and a description of the current financial environment in which healthcare organizations function. It then will explore the basics of financial and managerial accounting, presenting concepts that are critical to making sound financial decisions to better the cost-effectiveness of the organization.
    HCM 442 - Legal Aspects of Healthcare Management (4)
    Individuals in the healthcare industry face ever changing legal and ethical trends in their environment. Practitioners, therefore, need to develop specific skills to evolve into the role of a change agent in order to manage these trends. This course will provide the student with the skills necessary to mitigate liability through risk management principles, develop relationship management skills, apply an ethical decision-making framework, incorporate employment law procedures, and manage communication.
    HCM 472 - Contemporary Issues in Healthcare Mgmt (4)
    This is an issues oriented course that examines the healthcare delivery system in the United States. The course examines the entire continuum of care and uses the construct of a fully integrated system as a means to evaluate the current system to develop recommendations for further developments. Our intent is to identify the key issues confronting healthcare today, examine the causes and develop reasonable solutions to the current set of problems.
    Human Resources Management (16 hours)

    Managers encounter human resources (HR) issues daily, even when functioning in non-HR roles. Franklin’s Human Resources Management minor offers students an opportunity to increase the scope of their theoretical knowledge and practical abilities related to human resources management, including interviewing, hiring, training, motivating, and firing employees, as well as providing information about compensation and benefits.

    The educational objectives of the Human Resources Management minor are to enable a student to:

    • Integrate human resource concepts, principles, and practices into organizational situations
    • Apply concepts and theories of staffing, training, and development
    • Apply concepts and theories of compensation
    HRM 300 - Human Resources Management (4)
    An introduction to the human resources function and related elements and activities. The course outlines the roles and functions of members of the human resources department, as well as educating others outside human resources, in how their roles include human resources-related activities. The student will learn about the evolution in human resources management as we know it today. Emphasis is placed on the modern day importance of HRM and the new "corporate view" of the function. Additionally, the student will be exposed to the view of HRM from the perception of both management and subordinate employees. The importance of maintaining fair and equitable compensation and benefit programs will be discussed. The student will be exposed to practical situations and problem solving regarding areas of employee counseling, discipline and termination. Equal Employment Opportunity will be discussed in order for the student to understand its need, importance and the legal issues surrounding it. Other critical areas of training and development, staffing and strategy will also be explored.

    12 credit hours of Human Resources Management courses

    Information Systems (16 hours)

    The Information Systems minor is designed for those who have an interest in technology and want to effectively interact with an organization’s Information Services (IS) or Technology (IT) department. Students learn the skills necessary to understand information systems architecture, concepts, and practices, and develop a technical vocabulary to help bridge the communication gap between business and technology.

    The educational objectives of the Information Systems minor are to enable students to:

    • Analyze, plan, design, and maintain enterprise architecture
    • Integrate disparate information systems infrastructure
    • Analyze and design complete information systems.
    INFA 300 - Introduction to Analytics (4)
    This course leads students through the foundational concepts, methods and concerns related to the practice of information / data analysis from the posing of questions needing answers to gathering the data, generating statistics, analyzing the results, formulating answers to the questions, and reporting those answers. Course topics include defining clear, accurate and actionable research questions and the answers, selecting data and methods; generating relevant statistics and reporting the story the data tells regarding the questions and the sought-after answers using basic tools such as those intrinsic to spreadsheet software such as Microsoft Excel.
    ITEC 430 - Information Technology Project Management (4)
    This course provides an introduction to the concepts of information technology project management and techniques for initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling of resources to accomplish specific project goals. Both technical and behavioral aspects of project management are discussed. While the focus is on information technology projects, the principles follow the nine project management knowledge areas outlined in the Project Management Institute's PMBOK® Guide Third Edition and thus are applicable to the management of any project. Topics will include integration, scope, time, cost, quality, human resource, communications, risk, and procurement management. Project management software utilization is emphasized. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
    MIS 310 - Info Systems Architecture & Technology (4)
    This course provides a conceptual survey of general systems theory followed by a conceptual and technological survey of the structure of distributed information systems architectures, operating systems, network operating systems, peripheral technology and user interfaces. Interoperability between these architectural components will be explored and current technology and trends in each architectural element will be reviewed. This course will de-emphasize, although not ignore, mainframe architectures in favor of information architectures more applicable to client/server computing. The various interacting categories of client/server computing as well as the benefits and implications of such a system will be fully explored.
    MIS 400 - Systems Analysis & Design (4)
    This course is designed to provide a platform for students to gain both an understanding of, and basic competency in applying, object-oriented systems analysis and design (OOSAD). Emphasis will be on knowledge and skills related to analyzing, modeling and designing processes using the OO model. Topics studied include the software development life cycle (SDLC), analysis modeling, requirements determination, process and function modeling, structural and behavioral modeling and class, method, data management, interface and architecture design. The learning process will be one of working through, both individually and as part of a team, a case study-based project aimed at resolving the case study issues.
    Management & Leadership (16 hours)

    The Management minor provides key scholarly- and practitioner-based knowledge that will be of value to managers and leaders. The minor focuses on the development of leadership competencies in human resources, organizational behavior, change management, and transformational leadership.

    The educational objectives of the Management minor are to enable a student to:

    • Analyze the organizational behavior of a department or business and recommend changes for improvement
    • Analyze, recommend, and apply change management processes to real world situations
    • Create a leadership development plan through the integration of transformational leadership theory
    • Analyze organizational culture and evaluate its impact on an organizational performance
    MGMT 325 - Organizational Behavior (4)
    This course focuses on the organizational processes and theoretical constructs related to organizational behavior. The roles of leaders, followers, and teams and their influence on the culture and performance of an organization are addressed through the analysis of key organizational behavior concepts and related cases. Topics will include: values, perception, attitudes, assumptions, learning, motivation, conflict, diversity, and change. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
    MGMT 425 - Organizational Change (4)
    This course analyzes the forces that drive organizations to change, examines impediments to change, and surveys a range of approaches for making organizational change more effective. Students will develop an understanding of change processes and develop practical skills for becoming an organization change agent.
    MGMT 440 - Organizational Culture & Performance (4)
    This course focuses on the relationship between an organization's culture and its performance. The challenges and opportunities presented to both leaders and followers in adapting to and implementing organizational cultural change are addressed in this course. The impact culture performs as a mediating factor between a leader's style and the effective performance of an organization is examined in this course.
    MGMT 470 - Organizational Leadership (4)
    This course focuses on the development of leadership theories from trait, skill, style, situational, and contingency constructs and their utilization by managers and leaders. The primary emphasis of the course is the importance of the Full Range Leadership model and the role transformational leadership performs in the interaction with organizational culture and performance.
    Marketing (16 hours)

    Because marketing impacts overall business strategy and operations, the Marketing minor provides an opportunity for business generalists (e.g., Business Administration and Management majors) and functional specialists (e.g., Accounting and Human Resources Management majors) to increase the scope of their knowledge, skills, and abilities in
    marketing, advertising, and consumer behavior. Students are exposed to marketing theories and methods, advertising campaigns and procedures, and how behavioral sciences influence an organization’s messaging.

    The educational objectives of the Marketing minor are to enable a student to:

    • Evaluate marketing activities using generally accepted marketing principles, concepts, and terminology
    • Recognize the forces that effect consumer behavior
    • Plan for the implementation of advertising activities
    MKTG 300 - Marketing (4)
    Theory, strategies and methods are foundational to the informed practice of marketing. Students investigate the importance of marketing to an organization or cause, the interrelationship of the difference phases of marketing, the marketing of goods versus services, analysis and identification of markets, pricing strategies and digital marketing tactics. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
    MKTG 320 - Advertising & Promotion (4)
    A study of fundamental principles and practices of advertising that emphasizes the development of a creative strategy and the decision-making process for the recommendation, implementation, and evaluation of a promotional campaign in support of the organization's strategy.
    MKTG 330 - Marketing Behavior (4)
    An understanding of consumer decision processes is developed through application of behavioral sciences. Organizational decision-making processes are also considered. The implications of these processes are considered in relation to marketing, organizational strategies and decision making. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
    MKTG 332 - Marketing Research (4)
    Students develop an understanding of the theories and techniques of planning, conducting, analyzing and presenting market studies. Students will study different methodologies with emphasis on primary research including questionnaire design.
    Marketing Promotions (16 hours)

    Our Marketing Promotions minor will be of particular interest to students who are employed—or seek to be employed—in a capacity closely aligned with marketing, such as communications or public relations. By providing a working knowledge of advertising, public relations, and persuasion, this minor enables students to increase the depth
    and scope of their business repertoire.

    The educational objectives of the Marketing Promotions minor are to enable a student to:

    • Develop strategies that serve to persuade an audience or target population
    • Plan for the implementation of advertising activities
    • Use public relations activities to build and protect an organization’s reputation
    MKTG 320 - Advertising & Promotion (4)
    A study of fundamental principles and practices of advertising that emphasizes the development of a creative strategy and the decision-making process for the recommendation, implementation, and evaluation of a promotional campaign in support of the organization's strategy.
    MKTG 340 - Digital Marketing (4)
    Common strategies for the marketing of goods and services via the Internet range from public relations and corporate communications to advertising and electronic commerce. Students investigate and evaluate various marketing and communication strategies and tactics for the World Wide Web. Emphasis is placed on critical evaluation skills as well as website planning, development, design, and other factors which contribute to a website's success. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
    MKTG 345 - Social Media Marketing (4)
    In this course students will explore and utilize techniques for integrating social media marketing as an integral component of marketing campaigns, serving as listening and outreach tools for building brand awareness and promoting business. Through an investigation of tools which include internet forums, message boards, blogs, wikis, podcasts, picture sharing, video sharing, and social networking, students will have the opportunity to create and present a written plan for achieving business goals through the use of a social media marketing campaign.
    PBRL 325 - Public Relations (4)
    A general course in the technique of establishing and maintaining public relations. Activities span a variety of media to influence public opinion and manage an organization's reputation.
    Performance Management (16 hours)

    The performance management minor is designed for undergraduate students who have an interest in increasing the performance of employees and organizations. Using a systems perspective, the performance management minor exposes students to concepts related to change management; organization development; organization analysis; and
    individual, team, and organizational performance.

    The educational objectives of the Performance Management minor are to enable a student to:

    • Diagnose organization, group, and individual performance problems
    • Recommend organization, group, and individual intervention techniques
    • Design strategies to implement and evaluate planned and unplanned change
    • Describe the relationship between performance initiatives and organization strategy
    MGMT 325 - Organizational Behavior (4)
    This course focuses on the organizational processes and theoretical constructs related to organizational behavior. The roles of leaders, followers, and teams and their influence on the culture and performance of an organization are addressed through the analysis of key organizational behavior concepts and related cases. Topics will include: values, perception, attitudes, assumptions, learning, motivation, conflict, diversity, and change. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
    HRM 400 - Performance Management (4)
    This course uses a systems perspective to identify, select, develop, and evaluate solutions to document and improve the performance of individuals, groups, and organizations. Students will learn how to analyze performance problems and make recommendations at the employee, job, and organizational level that will assist the organization and its employees in achieving organizational goals and managing change. Students will also learn how to bridge the gap between organizational strategy, individuals, and departments.
    HRM 420 - Principles of Organizational Development (4)
    This course provides students with an overview of the emergence and development of organizational development as a field, processes for diagnosis and intervention, and basic skills needed to facilitate individual, small group, and organizational change. The course will also cover key concepts in organizational transformation, organizational development in global settings, and future directions in the field.
    MGMT 425 - Organizational Change (4)
    This course analyzes the forces that drive organizations to change, examines impediments to change, and surveys a range of approaches for making organizational change more effective. Students will develop an understanding of change processes and develop practical skills for becoming an organization change agent.
    Public Administration (16 hours)

    The minor in Public Administration is for students who want to work in public or nonprofit organizations or who want to understand the system of American government and how it can be made to function more effectively. The minor can help you become a better citizen, a better community member, and a better business person since all individuals and organizations must interact with government and are significantly affected by government policy and regulations. Students learn how to navigate the American political system at the national, state, and local levels; analyze government finances and the budgeting process; and how public and nonprofit organizations can be improved to operate more efficiently and effectively.

    The educational objectives of the Public Administration minor will enable a student to:

    • Examine the impact of government institutions and the political system on program implementation and administrative decision making in public and nonprofit organizations
    • Apply legal and ethical principles for administrative decision making
    • Analyze administrative situations using public administration concepts, organizational theories and principles of management
    • Analyze budget and financial information for administrative decision making and reporting
    HRM 400 - Performance Management (4)
    This course uses a systems perspective to identify, select, develop, and evaluate solutions to document and improve the performance of individuals, groups, and organizations. Students will learn how to analyze performance problems and make recommendations at the employee, job, and organizational level that will assist the organization and its employees in achieving organizational goals and managing change. Students will also learn how to bridge the gap between organizational strategy, individuals, and departments.
    PUAD 295 - American Government in Action (4)
    The course examines the American system of government and how government affects and interacts with individuals and organizations in society. Students learn how politics, law, and the structure and principles of American government impact citizens, public policy, and the administration of public and private organizations. Students apply fundamental political theories and administration law principles in personal and professional contexts.
    PUAD 305 - Introduction to Public Administration (4)
    Students are introduced to the field and profession of public administration. Students learn to think and act as ethical public administration professionals by developing a broad understanding of the political and organizational environment in which public administrators work and by applying fundamental analytical, decision- making, and communication skills. The professional knowledge and skills explored in the course provide a foundation for subsequent public administration courses.
    PUAD 420 - Government & Nonprofit Budgeting (4)
    Students learn fundamental budgeting, accounting, and financial management concepts and techniques necessary for planning, analysis, and decision making in government and nonprofit organizations. Students also examine the competing values and politics that underlie and impact the budget process and financial decisions. Finally, students apply skills for effectively communicating financial analysis methods and conclusions with colleagues, elected officials, the media, and the public.
    Public Relations (16 hours)

    The ability to develop, protect and preserve an organization’s positive reputation is critical in any industry. Franklin’s Public Relations minor is designed for those who recognize the need for knowledge in and have an appreciation of public relations, promotional strategy, and crisis communication, but work in a non-public relations capacity. Students develop skills in situation analysis, media response, and top-of mind awareness building.

    The educational objectives of the Public Relations minor will enable a student to:

    • Establish techniques for maintaining public relations within an organization
    • Examine a variety of media and their influence on public opinion
    • Create and implement appropriate persuasive and promotional strategies
    • Develop organizational crisis communication plans
    PBRL 325 - Public Relations (4)
    A general course in the technique of establishing and maintaining public relations. Activities span a variety of media to influence public opinion and manage an organization's reputation.
    PBRL 350 - Media Research & Writing (4)
    This course explores approaches and techniques for conducting research and writing within key public relations contexts. Students in this course will examine and utilize research techniques and methodologies that are essential for public relations professionals. Components of this course will include: journalistic research, copywriting, research and writing for broadcast, web research, writing for the Web, transforming technical information for general audiences, and media release writing. Additionally, this course will examine the ethics involved in researching and writing for public relations contexts.
    PBRL 425 - Media & Crisis Communication (4)
    Today's public relations professionals have entered a new era where preparedness to respond rapidly to various levels of crisis is essential. Building a positive reputation through the strategic management of communications with internal and external audiences during good times is a necessary foundation for withstanding negative press. Utilizing analysis techniques, public relations tactics, and hands-on projects, students will evaluate crisis situations, create and implement a strategic crisis communication plan, and learn to coach the corporate spokesperson and manage the media, while maintaining the organization's reputation.
    PBRL 445 - Public Relations & Promotional Strategy (4)
    Students research, develop and implement persuasive and promotional campaign strategies appropriate to corporate, governmental and non-profit organizations. This advanced course is designed for those who desire specialized skills in public relations and promotional communication. Emphasis is placed on various tactics including investor relations and employee communications.
    Public Safety Management & Leadership (16 hours)

    Most public safety agencies in major cities or large metropolitan areas employ significant numbers of civilian employees to support the sworn personnel in those agencies. The Public Safety Management minor is designed for nonsworn public safety employees to enhance their business and management skills in the area of public safety management.

    The educational objectives of the Public Safety Management & Leadership minor will enable a student to:

    • Apply principles of basic accounting, fiscal management and budgeting
    • Analyze the functions and interactions of various public safety agencies
    • Apply ethical principles, laws, and human relations skills to all
    • Evaluate the unique roles and challenges faced by public safety agencies in the Homeland Security environment
    CJAD 420 - Cybercrime (4)
    "Most assets escape exploitation not because they are impregnable but because they are not targeted." (Herley, 2014 p.70) Cybercrime is perpetrated all over the world and results in tremendous financial loss to many individuals, businesses, and countries of the World. This course sets out to accomplish several learning outcomes but also to develop a level of literacy about cyber related crime that will help to diminish or mitigate the problems associated with these types of crimes. The awareness of cybercrime-related activity as it pertains to your everyday life is important to your ability to navigate away from this serious criminal activity that is just beginning to grip our society. This course is designed as a literacy course and although it has critical terminology is not fundamentally a computer forensics or technical course. Herley, C., (2014). Security, Cybercrime, and Scale. Communications of the ACM, 57,(9). DOI:10.1145/2654847
    CJAD 360 - Intro: Terrorism & Intelligence Analysis (4)
    This course examines intelligence analysis and its indispensable relationship to the management of terrorist attacks, man-made disasters and natural disasters. It also explores vulnerabilities of our national defense and private sectors, as well as the threats posed to these institutions by terrorists. Students will discuss substantive issues regarding intelligence support of homeland security measures implemented by the United States and explore how the intelligence community operates.
    OR SEMT 450 - Critical Incident Management (4)
    The course will explore the NIMS, ICS, and other federally mandated systems in place for the management of critical incidents such as major fire scenes, major disasters, terrorist attacks, and other events that require a multi-agency response and recovery effort. The course discusses and evaluates the roles of high-level leadership in setting policy direction and planning as well as real-time management of the scene.
    PUAD 420 - Government & Nonprofit Budgeting (4)
    Students learn fundamental budgeting, accounting, and financial management concepts and techniques necessary for planning, analysis, and decision making in government and nonprofit organizations. Students also examine the competing values and politics that underlie and impact the budget process and financial decisions. Finally, students apply skills for effectively communicating financial analysis methods and conclusions with colleagues, elected officials, the media, and the public.
    SEMT 335 - Introduction to Emergency Management & Homeland Security (4)
    This course analyzes emergency management from a historical perspective. Disaster planning and disaster management in the post 9-11 environment are analyzed. The impact of Homeland Security on local public safety agencies is examined as are selected Homeland Security Presidential Directives (HSPD #5 and HSPD #11 in particular). The National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the National Response Plan (NRP) are examined with regard to their impact on local public safety agencies. Finally, special challenges for emergency management and disaster response will be analyzed.
    Web Development (16 hours)

    The Web Development minor enables students to learn Web layout, architecture, navigation, coding, and programming in order to create effective websites. This minor is designed for those who want to learn technical and graphic aspects of website development but do not want Web development to be a career focus. This minor is most suitable for
    a Computer Science major.

    The educational objectives of the Web Development minor will enable a student to:

    • Design and implement basic websites incorporating DHTML, Javascript, cascading style sheets, animation and rich internet applications
    • Apply the principles and elements of graphic design, typography, and color to the design of Web pages
    GRPH 210 - Fundamentals of Graphic Design (4)
    In this course students will explore the fundamental principles and creative process of graphic design. An emphasis is placed on visual problem solving skills and the creative and aesthetic aspects of traditional graphic design. The course also explores the implications of traditional graphic design in a digital format. NOTE: This is a technology course, in a technology program, and it requires the purchase of software that may be used in subsequent courses as well as being suitable for commercial work beyond completion of degree studies. For specific software requirements, consult the course syllabus.
    WEBD 236 - Web Information Systems Programming (4)
    This course builds web applications by employing server-side scripts that query relational databases. The student learns and reflects on two- and three-tier software architectures, separation of responsibility, model-view-controller pattern, basic security, and web frameworks. The student will design, code, test, debug, and document programs using a server-based scripting language. Note: This is a technology course in a technology program, and it requires the purchase of software that may be used in subsequent courses as well as being suitable for commercial work beyond completion of degree studies. For specific software requirements, consult the course syllabus.
    WEBD 335 - Advanced Client Side Development (4)
    This course builds on the fundamental concepts of constructing web pages by expanding into robust, efficient, and highly responsive client side applications of current web technologies. Students will apply advanced techniques that employ scripting languages, libraries, and frameworks to build interactive front ends to server applications. These web pages will be single page applications that use asynchronous scripting language callbacks to provide user interactivity. These applications will consume RESTful services.
    WEBD 435 - Advanced Server Side Development (4)
    This course builds on the fundamental concepts of constructing web pages by expanding into robust, efficient and highly responsive server side applications of current web technologies. Students will apply advanced techniques that employ server side languages, libraries, and frameworks to build interactive RESTful application programming interfaces (APIs). These APIs will be used to drive web applications that use asynchronous scripting language callbacks to provide user interactivity.

    Minor Requirements & Policies

    The responsibility for designating the requirements for a minor lies with the program/faculty offering the minor. Academic policies related to minors include the following:

    • Requirements for a minor should consist of a minimum of 16 credit hours
    • Students must attain a minimum 2.0 GPA in the minor area, and each minor course must be completed with a grade of "C" or better
    • Students must earn at least eight of the 16 credit hours for the minor at Franklin University
    • No more than four of the 16 credit hours can be used to fulfill any other specific degree requirements, such as the Major Area, Major Elective, General Education Core, or Business/Professional Core requirements
    • Courses for a minor may not be taken Credit/Non-Credit
    • Any prerequisites to courses in the minor must be honored