B.S. Human Resources Management
124
Credit Hours
76%
Max Transfer Credit
Class Type
100% online, 6 & 12-week courses
Next Start Date
Aug 16, 2021
Cost Per Credit
Accreditation
IACBE

Employ your skills by earning a human resource management degree

To stay competitive, employers need motivated, high-performing employees to complement their organizations. HR professionals are the ones who make it happen. Franklin’s transfer-friendly B.S. Human Resources Management degree program prepares you to execute key functions, such as hiring, developing and retaining employees.

Program Availability

On Site

IACBE Accredited

Our program follows best-practice standards for business education.

A Top-40 Best

Study HR from a program ranked "best" by College Choice.

Real-World Practitioners

Benefit from the teaching and experience of HR professionals.

SHRM-Aligned Curriculum

Learn relevant theory and recommended HR practices.

100% Online Classes

Earn your degree around your schedule.

Networking Opportunities

Build contacts and enhance your professional development.

Program Overview

Advance your career while helping others advance theirs

Through our Human Resources Management degree program curriculum, you will be well qualified to execute key functions within the HR department, understanding essential candidate analysis techniques, compensation models, training skills, and methods. Plus, you'll find plenty of opportunities to network with fellow HR students and professionals in the field.

As part of your HR major area courses, you’ll learn relevant skills that will prepare you to excel in any HR department. Bachelor’s-level students in the Human Resources Management major will: 

  • Discover ways to allow appropriate staffing
  • Encourage and initiate employee training and development
  • Apply organizational team-building concepts
  • Research compensation and benefits options spanning multiple industries
  • Learn to collaborate with employee and labor relations

Franklin's Human Resources Management degree program has been reviewed by the Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM) and recognized as aligning with SHRM's HR Curriculum Guidebook.

Learn from accredited curriculum taught by expert practitioners

Credentialed practitioners and respected experts in human resources teach our relevant curriculum, so you’ll learn real-world lessons from their years of experience. And Franklin’s Human Resources Management bachelor's degree program is accredited by the International Accreditation Council for Business Education (IACBE), a leader in outcomes-based accreditation in business, so you know you’re earning a respected degree with value in the workplace.

Earn your degree from a university built for busy adults

Earn your degree on your terms by taking classes 100% online or pursue available coursework at our Main Campus. Regionally accredited and nonprofit, Franklin was built from the ground-up to satisfy the needs of adult learners. Our seamless transfer process and team of academic advisors will help ease your transition to becoming a student, while our flexible course schedules help to balance your education with work, family, and life. Get started on your future today.

Read more >

Michelle

B.S. Human Resources Management '15

"Franklin's course format helped me because the assignments were laid out for me and organized. I knew what I needed to complete and by when. It helped me with my time management and helped me to be successful."

SHRM Aligned

The bachelor's in human resource management program fully aligns with the Society for Human Resource Management's (SHRM) HR Curriculum Guidebook and Templates.

IACBE Accredited Program

The Ross College of Business at Franklin University has received specialized accreditation for its business programs through the International Accreditation Council for Business Education (IACBE) located at 11374 Strang Line Road in Lenexa, Kansas, USA. For a listing of accredited programs, click here.

Curriculum & Course Descriptions

124 Semester Hours
Fundamental General Education
English Composition
ENG 120 - College Writing (4)

In this course, students acquire the writing competence necessary for conducting and presenting research. A variety of assignments, beginning with personal reflections, build upon one another, as students develop ideas that respond to, critique, and synthesize the positions of others. Students systematize and organize knowledge in ways that will help them in all of their courses. The course also emphasizes the elements of good writing style, appropriate grammar and mechanics, clarity of language, and logical and cohesive development. It culminates in submission of a documented research paper.

Mathematics
MATH 215 - Statistical Concepts (4)

This course introduces the student to statistics with business applications. The course covers both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics included are: measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion; graphical displays of data; linear regression; basic probability concepts; binomial and normal probability distributions; confidence intervals; and hypothesis testing. These topics will be covered using a basic knowledge of algebra and Microsoft Excel.

Choose either MATH 140 Introduction to Quantitative Reasoning or MATH 150 Fundamental Algebra as the prerequisite. Course can count as a University elective.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
ECON 220 - Introduction to Macroeconomics (4)

An introduction to economic theory involving the basic underlying causes and principles of the operation of an economic system. Emphasis is placed on studying the economy as a whole. Issues of inflation, unemployment, taxation, business cycles and growth are discussed in the context of the global economic system.

2 credits from the following types of courses:
Choose from the Anthropology, Geography, History, Political Science, Psychology, or Sociology disciplines.

Science

6 credits from the following types of courses:
Two courses from the Science discipline. One course must have a lab component.

Arts & Humanities

6 credits from the following types of courses:
Choose from the Art, English Literature, Fine Arts, Humanities, Music, Philosophy, Religion or Theater disciplines.

Additional General Education
PF 121 - Basic Learning Strategies (2)

This course introduces students to the Franklin University community and provides strategies for successful transition to and participation in that community. Topics include University resources and procedures, strategies for advancing communication skills, the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments, and the development of an academic and career plan.

OR PF 321 - Learning Strategies (2)

This course prepares students to be successful lifelong learners both academically and in their chosen careers. Franklin courses require a high level of self-directed learning and focus on skills required in the workplace and the classroom that are easily transferable between the two environments. The course includes strategies for advancing communication skills, including the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments. The assignments and activities in the course are created to closely simulate teamwork found in the workplace.

COMM 150 - Interpersonal Communication (4)

By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking.

OR SPCH 100 - Speech Communication (4)

This public-speaking course emphasizes the fundamentals of extemporaneous speaking. Skill-building activities and assignments focus on research, organization, reasoning, style and delivery of presentations as well as listening and audience engagement.

ENG 205 - Business & Professional Writing (4)

This is an intermediate composition course focusing on writing for business and professional purposes. Students will review the writing conventions commonly expected within business and professional environments, as well as strategies for analyzing rhetorical situations within those environments. Coursework includes analysis, revision, and research exercises, as well as substantial practice in composing business correspondence. The final project is an extensive, researched business proposal developed in stages and presented to the class. Students will be encouraged to relate course materials to their major programs and workplace experiences.

Major Foundational
ACCT 202 - Financial/Managerial Acct for Non-Majors (4)

This course is an introduction to financial and managerial accounting. It is designed for non-accounting majors. Financial accounting emphasizes how general purpose financial statements communicate information about the business's performance and position for users external to management. It emphasizes how the accountant processes and presents the information. The course also examines the major elements of the financial statements. The managerial accounting portion of the course studies internal reporting and decision-making. The course assists those who wish to learn "what the numbers mean" in a clear, concise and conceptual manner without focusing on the mechanical aspects of the accounting process.

BSAD 220 - Business Law (4)

A study of the everyday legal problems encountered in business with emphasis on the areas of legal procedure, contracts, agency, employment law, business organizations and torts, with cases relating to these and other areas.

ECON 210 - Introduction to Microeconomics (4)

An introduction to economic theory involving the examination of how decision making by firms and individuals is shaped by economic forces. Emphasis is placed on demand, supply, market equilibrium analysis, and basic market structure models. The invisible hand as the driving force for economic decisions as well as market externalities are discussed. The class concentrates on providing a balanced approach to studying economic agents' behavior and the global implications and outcomes.

FINA 301 - Principles of Finance (4)

This course is designed to survey the field of finance and provide the foundation for more advanced finance coursework. Topics include sources of business and financial information, financial statement analysis, the time value of money, the nature and measurement of risk, financial institutions, investments and corporate finance.

MGMT 312 - Principles of Management (4)

This course explores the basic concepts and processes of management. Students will explore the functional roles and processes of planning, leading, organizing, and controlling comprising the manager role. Students develop skills related to the manager function that are required in today's competitive environment.

MKTG 300 - Marketing (4)

Theory, strategies and methods are foundational to the informed practice of marketing. Students investigate the importance of marketing to an organization or cause, the interrelationship of the difference phases of marketing, the marketing of goods versus services, analysis and identification of markets, pricing strategies and digital marketing tactics.

Completion of ACCT 215 - Financial Accounting & ACCT 225 - Managerial Accounting can fulfill the ACCT 202 requirement.

Major Area Required
HRM 300 - Human Resources Management (4)

An introduction to the human resources function and related elements and activities. The course outlines the roles and functions of members of the human resources department, as well as educating others outside human resources, in how their roles include human resources-related activities. The student will learn about the evolution in human resources management as we know it today. Emphasis is placed on the modern day importance of HRM and the new "corporate view" of the function. Additionally, the student will be exposed to the view of HRM from the perception of both management and subordinate employees. The importance of maintaining fair and equitable compensation and benefit programs will be discussed. The student will be exposed to practical situations and problem solving regarding areas of employee counseling, discipline and termination. Equal Employment Opportunity will be discussed in order for the student to understand its need, importance and the legal issues surrounding it. Other critical areas of training and development, staffing and strategy will also be explored.

HRM 301 - Staffing (4)

This course examines all aspects of getting employees into organizations. Recruitment and selection are the foci. This course covers scientific and legal issues from a managerial perspective and examines the usefulness of various methods used in job analysis, testing and measurement, and internal and external market analysis. Legislation regarding EEO and affirmative action programs are discussed.

HRM 302 - Training & Development (4)

This course covers the theories and techniques of training and development from strategic and operational perspectives. Emphasis is placed on employee needs assessment, program design, implementation and evaluation. Learning theories and long-term development for global competitiveness are discussed.

HRM 401 - Compensation & Benefits (4)

This course is an in-depth examination of pay and benefit theories and practices. The course analyzes job evaluation techniques, salary surveys, individual and group performance-based pay, as well as insurance and pension plan administration.

HRM 402 - Employee & Labor Relations (4)

This course evaluates the current environment of employee and labor relations. Students will compare and distinguish the differences between employee relations and labor relations environments. Topics such as handbooks versus contracts, employee discipline versus grievance procedures, and workplace compliance laws, such as ADA, FMLA, sexual harassment, and the Civil Rights Act are discussed.

HRM 495 - Strategic Human Resources Capstone (4)

Capstone course for HRM majors. Investigates the strategic management process from the HR perspective. Topics include strategic HR, strategic alignment, balanced scorecard and competitive strategic analysis. Intensive use of case analysis, including a cross-functional senior practicum with students from Finance, Marketing and Management Information Systems majors.

Major Electives

At least 4 credits from the following courses:

BSAD 320 - Quant & Qual Methods for Decision Making (4)

This course focuses on the development of individual and team decision-making and problem solving skills. Real world domestic and global issues will be analyzed, diagnosed, and evaluated through the application of a variety of quantitative and qualitative tools and techniques used to arrive at effective decisions and solutions.

BSAD 476 - Global Business Issues (4)

This course focuses on global economic integration and emerging market economies and the effects these trends have on both service and manufacturing industries in the short- and long-term. Other global business issues will include: the European Union (EU), North American Free Trade Association (NAFTA), and the World Trade Organization (WTO); environmental considerations in business operations; the influences of the political and legal environment on markets; the strategies for business entry into a global market; and the development of leadership talent in a global setting.

ENTR 395 - Foundations of Entrepreneurship (4)

Foundations of Entrepreneurship is an introductory course that examines the theory, practice, and tools of entrepreneurship. Various entrepreneurship structures and how such structures result in different unique pathways to success are explored. Students will focus on the importance of developing an entrepreneurial mindset as they assess their individual values and determine their affinity for entrepreneurial thinking, while also reviewing the risks and rewards of entrepreneurial businesses in the context of their chosen entrepreneurial philosophy. Finally, students will identify and evaluate opportunities for new ventures, and consider a strategic approach for successful business plan development.

HRM 400 - Performance Management (4)

This course uses a systems perspective to identify, select, develop, and evaluate solutions to document and improve the performance of individuals, groups, and organizations. Students will learn how to analyze performance problems and make recommendations at the employee, job, and organizational level that will assist the organization and its employees in achieving organizational goals and managing change. Students will also learn how to bridge the gap between organizational strategy, individuals, and departments.

HRM 420 - Principles of Organizational Development (4)

This course provides students with an overview of the emergence and development of organizational development as a field, processes for diagnosis and intervention, and basic skills needed to facilitate individual, small group, and organizational change. The course will also cover key concepts in organizational transformation, organizational development in global settings, and future directions in the field.

MGMT 325 - Organizational Behavior (4)

This course focuses on the organizational processes and theoretical constructs related to organizational behavior. The roles of leaders, followers, and teams and their influence on the culture and performance of an organization are addressed through the analysis of key organizational behavior concepts and related cases. Topics will include: values, perception, attitudes, assumptions, learning, motivation, conflict, diversity, and change.

PSYC 325 - Coaching in Organizations (4)

This course is designed to introduce students to the use of coaching skills for improving the adjustment and performance of individuals in an organizational setting. Topics to be covered include: the scope of coaching practice, optimal practitioner characteristics, benefits for coaches, related organizational dynamics, and coaching interventions and resources. This course also includes an emphasis on experimental learning through coaching practice activities.

BUSA 200 - Database Fundamentals (2)

This introductory course focuses on applying information technology to business strategies using databases. The student will gain a working knowledge of current database technology, including relational database concepts, database design, data extraction, and data warehousing while working with database applications.

DATA 300 - Introduction to Analytics (4)

This course introduces the fundamentals of Business and Data Analytics. Students will learn the fundamentals of business problem framing, data wrangling, descriptive and inferential statistics, data visualization, and data storytelling in analytics. Not open to students with credit for INFA 300.

University Electives

36 credits from the following types of courses:
Any undergraduate courses offered by the University except developmental education courses.

Additional Requirements

All students are required to pass College Writing (ENG 120), and either Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121) or Learning Strategies (PF 321) prior to enrolling in any course at the 200 level or above. Students who enroll at Franklin with 30 or fewer hours of transfer credit are required to pass PF 121 Basic Learning Strategies in place of PF 321 Learning Strategies. Interpersonal Communication (COMM 150) or Speech Communication (SPCH 100) must be taken prior to enrolling in any course at the 300 level or above. Students must also meet the University algebra competency requirement.

Program Details

Hear What Our HR Graduates Are Saying

Chris R.
B.S. Human Resource Management

"Having this education from Franklin has really allowed me to be the successful, professional I am today and without it, I would not be where I am today for sure."

Kevin S.
B.S. Human Resources Management '16

"It was important for me to feel supported during my education. The 3+1 transfer program exceeded by expectations."

Brian K.
B.S. Human Resources Management '21

"Graduating college with a bachelor's degree has been a lifelong dream of mine. I am so grateful to Franklin University for helping to make my dream come true!"

Taylor A.
B.S. Human Resources Management '20

"This accomplishment has brought a sense of pride as well as confidence that I can do anything I set my mind to."

Michelle O.
B.S. Human Resources Management '15

"Franklin's course format helped me because the assignments were laid out for me and organized. I knew what I needed to complete and by when. It helped me with my time management and helped me to be successful."

Curtis L.
B.S. Human Resources Management '21

"It's a great feeling to accomplish this goal and set an example for my son."

Amanda M.
B.S. Human Resources Management '21

"I’m over the moon and it feels so fantastic that words can’t describe it."

Andrea M.
B.S. Human Resources Management '20

“Receiving my degree is one of the happiest moments of my life, as it solidifies the hard work and time dedicated to achieving this throughout these years. I now look forward to the future and opportunities ahead of me.”

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Career Opportunities

Compensation Analyst

Compensation Analysts assess salary ranges and increases, and classify job responsibilities to ensure alignment with market changes and compliance with regulations.

Employee Relations Supervisor

Employee Relations Supervisors act as liaison in the resolution of issues and concerns regarding compensation and benefits, workplace safety, training, recruitment, and development.

Human Resource Generalist

Human Resource Generalists source, recruit, and interview prospective employees; support implementation of human resources programs, and mediate employee issues.

Labor Relations Specialist

Labor Relations Specialists assist with administering labor contracts, arbitration, grievances, and interventions related to employee welfare, benefits and workplace practices.

Recruitment Specialist

Recruitment Specialists facilitate the process of screening, interviewing, and hiring candidates, as well as onboarding new hires.

Training and Development Coordinator

Training & Development Coordinators create, implement, and evaluate workshops, seminars, events, and programs to support the professional development of staff.

Employment Outlook

8%

From 2021-2031, jobs in Human Resources Management are expected to increase by 8%

All Occupations

2021
3,244,241 jobs
2031
3,488,363 jobs
Show Details >

Compensation and Benefits Managers

2021
16,183 jobs
2031
17,152 jobs

Human Resources Managers

2021
178,831 jobs
2031
191,405 jobs

Training and Development Managers

2021
49,017 jobs
2031
52,899 jobs

Human Resources Specialists

2021
730,427 jobs
2031
792,808 jobs

Compensation, Benefits, and Job Analysis Specialists

2021
92,655 jobs
2031
101,228 jobs

Training and Development Specialists

2021
343,067 jobs
2031
378,298 jobs


Source information provided by Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI).

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