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B.S. Financial Management

Position yourself for success with a financial management degree

From medicine to media, retail to transportation, Wall Street to Main Street, every type, size and form of business has something in common: the need for a solid bottomline. With it, business thrives; without it, business dies. It’s that simple. So what’s the bottom line of the bottomline? Businesses and financial institutions need people who understand the ins and outs of finance, including capitalization, resource allocation and money management.

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IACBE Accredited

Our program follows best-practice standards for business education.

Customizable Program

Design a program that meets your goals and interests.

Real-World Practitioners

Learn best practices from financial management professionals.

100% Online Classes

Earn your degree around your schedule.

Hands-On Simulations

Gain true-to-life experience as a financial management consultant.

Accredited Online University

Nearly 80% of our students take online courses.

Program Overview

Be in the business of managing the financial performance of business

Franklin's transfer-friendly Financial Management Major teaches you how to analyze an organization’s financial performance and ensure good financial health. You’ll acquire in-demand knowledge and skills in such critical areas as financial analysis and forecasting, portfolio management, cash management, international finance, and financial risk management.

Sharpen your skills for a variety of in-demand career opportunities

Our broad, interdisciplinary program prepares you for a variety of career opportunities from business financial management to international finance to banking and investment management. Our curriculum will teach you how firms raise funds, make portfolio decisions and projections, and accept and manage risk in domestic and international markets. You’ll also grapple with today’s biggest ethical issues through coursework and peer discussion, sharpening your future ability to manage conflicts of interest with forethought and integrity.

Acquire hands-on experience through applied analysis & simulations

With Franklin’s Financial Management Major, you’ll learn important fundamentals while also acquiring significant and relevant exposure to real-world experience. For example, you’ll analyze investments and stocks used to create portfolios, and you’ll research initial public offerings (IPOs) and review the financial performance of real companies.

In your capstone assignment, you’ll collaborate with students from other business majors in a simulated business environment. In your role as a financial management consultant, you’ll conduct ratio analysis, complete financial statement pro forma projections, and assess capital structure. These projects help you put financial management in the context of overall corporate strategy, while preparing you to work the way business really works, in cross-functional teams.

Expand your learning with in-depth elective studies

At Franklin, you can enrich your knowledge even more with elective areas that complement your chosen career path, such as accounting and financial planning. And because experienced financial professionals teach our practitioner-driven program, you’ll learn from and through them, benefiting from their workplace successes and mistakes.

Franklin’s Financial Management Major is accredited by the International Accreditation Council for Business Education (IACBE), the leader in outcomes-based accreditation in business, so you know you’re earning a respected degree with value in the workplace.

Earn your degree from a university built for busy adults

Earn your degree on your terms by taking classes 100% online or pursue available coursework at one of our Midwest locations. Regionally accredited and nonprofit, Franklin was built from the ground-up to satisfy the needs of adult learners. Our seamless transfer process and team of academic advisors will help ease your transition to becoming a student, while our flexible course schedules help to balance your education with work, family, and life. Get started on your future today.

Source information provided by Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI)

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Curriculum & Course Descriptions

124 Semester Hours
Fundamental General Education Core (24 hours)
English Composition (3 hours)

Choose a minimum of 3 semester hours from:

WRIT 120 - COLLEGE WRITING (4)
In this course, students acquire the writing competence necessary for conducting and presenting research. A variety of assignments, beginning with personal reflections, build upon one another, as students develop ideas that respond to, critique, and synthesize the positions of others. Students systematize and organize knowledge in ways that will help them in all of their courses. The course also emphasizes the elements of good writing style, appropriate grammar and mechanics, clarity of language, and logical and cohesive development. It culminates in submission of a documented research paper.

*If the course does not have a research paper component, WRIT 130 Research Paper, two semester credits, is also required.

Mathematics (3 hours)

Choose a minimum of three semester hours from:

MATH 215 - STATISTICAL CONCEPTS (4)
This course introduces the student to statistics with business applications. The course covers both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics included are: measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion; graphical displays of data; linear regression; basic probability concepts; binomial and normal probability distributions; confidence intervals; and hypothesis testing. These topics will be covered using a basic knowledge of algebra and Microsoft Excel. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.

Choose either MATH 115 Introduction to Quantitative Reasoning or MATH 150 Fundamental Algebra as the prerequisite. Both can count as a general education or University elective.

Choose either MATH 115 Introduction to Quantitative Reasoning or MATH 150 Fundamental Algebra as the prerequisite. Both can count as a general education or University elective.

*At least one mathematics or statistics course beyond the level of intermediate algebra.

Sciences (6 hours)

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

SCIE 210 - UNDERSTANDING SCIENCE: PRINCIPLES, PRACTICE, & THEORY (2)
Understanding Science: Principles, Practice & Theory is a two credit hour course that introduces students to the major themes, processes, and methods common to all scientific disciplines. Students will develop critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate all kinds of phenomena, scientific, pseudoscientific, and other. The focus is on the nature of science so students will develop an understanding of how science works and develop an appreciation for the process by which we gain scientific knowledge.
SCIE 211 - INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC ANALYSIS & REASONING (4)
Introduction to Scientific Analysis and Reasoning is a four credit hour course consisting of three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of laboratory. This course is an introduction to critical thinking on statistical and scientific claims. The student will develop the critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate popular sources of (mis)information and to better understand and evaluate all sorts of scientific claims and arguments. The focus of the course is on students developing thoughtful and critical use of scientific information and research to be able to separate truth from deception and make decisions that affect their personal lives and roles as informed and engaged citizens.

*Two science courses, with one having a laboratory component.

Social and Behavioral Sciences (6 hours)

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

ECON 220 - INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS (4)
An introduction to economic theory involving the basic underlying causes and principles of the operation of an economic system. Emphasis is placed on studying the economy as a whole. Issues of inflation, unemployment, taxation, business cycles and growth are discussed in the context of the global economic system.
  • Choose an additional course from the Anthropology, Psychology, or Sociology discipline, or PUAD 295 American Government in Action.

*The six semester hours must come from at least two different disciplines

Arts and Humanities (6 hours)

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

HUMN 210 - INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC & CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS (2)
The goal of this course is to help you improve as a critical, logical thinker. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. You will discover how to apply these valuable skills to your studies and everyday life, learning how to overcome obstacles to critical thinking, and how to avoid being deceived by means of misleading reasoning.
  • Choose additional coursework from the Humanities discipline.

Additional General Education Requirements (12 hours)
COMP 106 - INTRODUCTION TO SPREADSHEETS (1)
This course focuses on using spreadsheets to solve business applications.
COMP 108 - INTRODUCTION TO DATABASES (1)
This course focuses on using databases to solve business applications.
PF 321 - LEARNING STRATEGIES (2)
This course prepares students to be successful lifelong learners both academically and in their chosen careers. Franklin courses require a high level of self-directed learning and focus on skills required in the workplace and the classroom that are easily transferable between the two environments. The course includes strategies for advancing communication skills, including the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments. The assignments and activities in the course are created to closely simulate teamwork found in the workplace.
COMM 150 - INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION (4)
By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
OR SPCH 100 - SPEECH COMMUNICATION (4)
A basic public speaking course intended to improve the student's ability to think critically and to communicate orally. Theory and practice are provided in various speaking situations. Each student is required to speak before an audience, but class work also involves reading, gathering and organizing information, writing and listening.
WRIT 320 - BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WRITING (4)
This is an advanced composition course that focuses on writing for business and professional purposes. Students will review the writing conventions commonly expected within business and professional environments, as well as strategies for analyzing rhetorical situations within those environments. Coursework includes analysis, revision, and research exercises, as well as substantial practice in composing business correspondence. The final project is an extensive, researched business proposal developed in stages and presented to the class. Students will be encouraged to relate course materials to their major programs and workplace experiences.
Business Core (28 hours)
ACCT 215 - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (4)
An introduction to accounting emphasizing how general purpose financial statements communicate information about the business corporation's performance and position for users external to management. Approximately one third of the course emphasizes how the accountant processes and presents the information and includes exposure to recording transactions, adjusting balances and preparing financial statements for service and merchandise firms according to established rules and procedures. The balance of the course examines major elements of the statements such as cash, receivables, inventory, long'lived assets, depreciation, payroll, bonds, and other liabilities and stocks. Concepts of this course are applied to Managerial Accounting (ACCT 225). Students are advised to avoid any time lapse between these courses.
ACCT 225 - MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (4)
The study of management accounting for internal reporting and decision-making. The course introduces a business-management approach to the development and use of accounting information. Major topics include cost behavior, cost analysis, profit planning and control measures. Accounting for decentralized operations, capital budgeting decisions, and ethical challenges in managerial accounting are also covered.
BSAD 220 - BUSINESS LAW (4)
A study of the everyday legal problems encountered in business with emphasis on the areas of legal procedure, contracts, agency, employment law, business organizations and torts, with cases relating to these and other areas.
ECON 210 - INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS (4)
An introduction to economic theory involving the examination of how decision making by firms and individuals is shaped by economic forces. Emphasis is placed on demand, supply, market equilibrium analysis, and basic market structure models. The invisible hand as the driving force for economic decisions as well as market externalities are discussed. The class concentrates on providing a balanced approach to studying economic agents' behavior and the global implications and outcomes.
FINA 301 - PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE (4)
This course is designed to survey the field of finance and provide the foundation for more advanced finance coursework. Topics include sources of business and financial information, financial statement analysis, the time value of money, the nature and measurement of risk, financial institutions, investments and corporate finance.
MGMT 312 - PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (4)
This course explores the basic concepts and processes of management. Students will explore the functional roles and processes of planning, leading, organizing, and controlling comprising the manager role. Students develop skills related to the manager function that are required in today's competitive environment.
MKTG 300 - MARKETING (4)
Theory, strategies and methods are foundational to the informed practice of marketing. Students investigate the importance of marketing to an organization or cause, the interrelationship of the difference phases of marketing, the marketing of goods versus services, analysis and identification of markets, pricing strategies and digital marketing tactics. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
University Electives (32 hours)

Any undergraduate courses offered by the University except developmental education courses.

Major Area (20 hours)
FINA 340 - MONEY, BANKING & FINANCIAL MARKETS (4)
This course provides an overview of the financial system. The roles of money, financial intermediaries, financial markets, and central banks are discussed in the context of global economy.
FINA 403 - ADVANCED FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (4)
An introduction to advanced concepts and methods of financial management. Topics include risk and return, asset evaluation, capital budgeting, capital structure, business financial planning and working capital management.
FINA 405 - INVESTMENTS (4)
An examination of investment markets, transactions, planning and information. Topics include investment risk and return measures, debt and equity instruments, evaluation techniques, hybrid and derivative securities, mutual funds, real estate investments, tax planning and the investment process, and portfolio management.
FINA 450 - GLOBAL FINANCE (4)
An examination of financial management in the global economy. Topics include international financial markets, exchange rates, interest rates and inflation, exchange rate risk management, working capital management, capital budgeting, country risk analysis, long-term financing, and global strategic planning.
FINA 495 - FINANCIAL POLICY SEMINAR (4)
This course is designed to provide a capstone experience for Financial Management majors, challenging them to apply their knowledge of finance to actual business problems and cases. Topics considered may vary with each offering of the course.
Major Electives (8 hours)

Select 8 hours from:

ACCT 310 - INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I (4)
The first of two in-depth financial accounting courses. Theory, the conceptual framework, development of generally accepted accounting principles, and applications are stressed. Topics include the income statement, the statement of cash flows and the balance sheet, specifically asset accounts.
ACCT 320 - INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II (4)
The second of two in-depth financial accounting courses. Theory, concepts and applications are stressed. Topics include time value of money, current and non-current liabilities, leases, deferred taxes, retirement benefits, stockholders' equity, earning per share, accounting changes and errors, and statement of cash flows.
ACCT 330 - COST MANAGEMENT (4)
This course is an in-depth study of cost accounting focusing on its role in internal reporting and the resulting decision-making processes. Students will evaluate the foundation, ethics and basic costing systems employed in the management accounting profession; analyze budgeting, cost behavior, pricing and profitability concepts and principles; determine how cost allocations, product quality, and investment decisions are applied by management accountants; determine how current trends in various industries impact cost accounting; and demonstrate knowledge that is in accordance with the educational requirements for the Certified Management Accountant (CMA) exam.
ENTR 395 - FOUNDATIONS OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP (4)
Foundations of Entrepreneurship is an introductory course that examines the theory, practice, and tools of entrepreneurship. Various entrepreneurship structures and how such structures result in different unique pathways to success are explored. Students will focus on the importance of developing an entrepreneurial mindset as they assess their individual values and determine their affinity for entrepreneurial thinking, while also reviewing the risks and rewards of entrepreneurial businesses in the context of their chosen entrepreneurial philosophy. Finally, students will identify and evaluate opportunities for new ventures, and consider a strategic approach for successful business plan development.
FINA 410 - FINANCE INTERNSHIP (1-4)
This course provides qualified students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for supervised professional training and experience in an actual work environment. This Internship is an ongoing seminar between the student, the faculty member and the employment supervisor. It involves an Internship Application and Learning Agreement, periodic meetings with the faculty representative, professional experience at a level equivalent to other senior-level courses and submission of material as established in the Internship Application and Learning Agreement. Participation cannot be guaranteed for all applicants.
FINA 480 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN FINANCE (1-4)
This course is designed to address significant issues of current interest outside the regular Financial Management curriculum. The course topic will vary. The topic description will be published online in the Course Schedule each trimester the course is offered.
FPLN 300 - PRINCIPLES OF FINANCIAL PLANNING (4)
An introduction to personal financial planning. Topics include the financial planning process, money management and investments, insurance needs, income tax planning, retirement planning and estate planning. Cases are used to illustrate important planning concepts, techniques and issues.
FPLN 430 - TAX PLANNING (4)
An introduction to federal income taxation and the role of the tax code in financial planning for individuals, businesses, and business owners. Topics include the tax environment, fundamentals of income tax planning, the measurement of taxable income, the taxation of business income, individual income taxation, and the tax compliance process.
FPLN 440 - RISK MANAGEMENT & INSURANCE PLANNING (4)
An introduction to the techniques and issues of risk management and insurance for businesses and individuals. Topics include legal principles in risk and insurance, insurance contracts, personal property and liability risk, life and health risks, social insurance, insurance companies and product markets, insurance pricing, insurance taxation, government regulation of insurance, and professional ethics and market conduct.
Additional Requirements

All students are required to pass College Writing (WRIT 120), either Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121) or Learning Strategies (PF 321) and either Speech Communication (SPCH 100) or Interpersonal Communication (COMM 150) prior to enrolling in any other course at the 200 level or above. Either PF 121 or PF 321 must be taken prior to the first BLF course, or it may be taken concurrently with the first 15-week BLF course. Students who enroll at Franklin with 30 or fewer hours of transfer credit are required to pass Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121) in place of Learning Strategies (PF 321). Students must also meet the University algebra competency requirement.

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Program Details

Career Opportunities

Asset and Liability Manager

Asset and Liability Managers oversee individual or company assets and investments, working to maximize value and minimize risk.

Bank Officer

Bank Officers oversee bank operations, ensure correct accounting procedures, approve loans, and nurture customer relationships.

Cash Manager

Cash Managers handle an organization’s financial transactions, from accounts payable to taxes to expenses.

Credit Manager

Credit Managers evaluate and approve credit applications, compile financial reports, and ensure that security measures are in place to safeguard against theft and fraud.

Financial Analyst

Financial analysts help ensure financial performance by evaluating, synthesizing and reporting on a variety of financial data, including investments, forecasts and trends.

Financial Risk Manager

Financial Risk Managers assess financial risk, and develop policies, procedures, and processes to manage or mitigate these risks.

Portfolio Manager

Portfolio Managers create, recommend, and implement investment plans in support of individual or business goals and objectives.

Stockbroker

Stockbrokers buy and sell shares of stock, recommend investment stocks, and implement risk strategies in support of reaching financial goals.

Trader

Traders manage individual or corporate financial portfolios, buying and selling securities in order to achieve financial objectives.

Treasurer

Treasurers oversee cash-management activities, including monitoring cash reserves, overseeing banking transactions, and ensuring internal processes and controls.

Employment Outlook

14%

From 2015-2025 jobs in Financial Management are expected to increase by 14%

Budget Analysts

2015
1,934 jobs
2025
2,257 jobs

Credit Analysts

2015
3,874 jobs
2025
4,246 jobs

Financial Managers

2015
19,453 jobs
2025
21,655 jobs

Financial Analysts

2015
10,235 jobs
2025
11,814 jobs

Personal Financial Advisors

2015
12,185 jobs
2025
15,849 jobs

Loan Officers

2015
8,447 jobs
2025
9,324 jobs

Financial Specialists, All Other

2015
2,788 jobs
2025
3,038 jobs


Source information provided by Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) - June 2016

Knowledge & Skillsets

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