B.S. Social Sciences
120
Credit Hours
75%
Max Transfer Credit
Class Type
100% online, 6 & 12-week courses
Next Start Date
Aug 16, 2021
Cost Per Credit

Chart your unique career path with a social science degree

Social science professionals are effective communicators, team players, critical thinkers, and problem solvers who can apply research and theory to understand a variety of societal issues. Since it takes a unique skill set to excel in the social sciences, we’ve designed our major to be highly customizable and multidisciplinary so you have the necessary skills to meet your specific career goals.

Program Availability

On Site

Customizable Program

Design a program that meets your goals and interests.

100% Online Classes

Earn your degree around your schedule.

Finish Faster

Transfer up to 94 previously earned college credits.

Transformative Learning

Learn from relevant research methods and analysis techniques.

Hands-On Practicum

Gain valuable experience in your field.

Accredited Online University

Nearly 80% of our students take online courses.

Program Overview

Finish your degree faster by transferring previously earned credits

In Franklin’s transfer-friendly online Social Sciences degree program, you can transfer up to 3/4 of your degree requirements, including previous coursework in anthropology, archaeology, criminal justice, criminology, cultural resource management, decision science, economics, geography, history, international relations, political science, psychology, sociology, or other related social science field.

By transferring social science credits you’ve already earned to Franklin, you’ll be able to finish your bachelor’s degree faster and at a lower cost.

Personalize your studies to achieve your career aspirations

A unique benefit of the Social Science degree program is that you are not tied to one specific social science discipline. Instead, our curriculum is designed to allow you to choose courses from a variety of social science areas, including anthropology, psychology, business economics, criminal justice administration, or sociology. As a result, you’ll gain knowledge and skills that are specific to your own career goals.

In addition, you can enhance your coursework with experiential learning. A unique opportunity at the undergraduate level, you’ll observe professionals in the field and document their work. You may even have the opportunity to perform similar tasks under the supervision of instructors and on-site staff.

Learn the tools and methods to understand societal issues

As a student in our online Social Sciences bachelor's degree program, you will have the opportunity to explore relevant research methods and analysis techniques in pursuit of cause-and-effect relationships within society. You’ll focus on applying the scientific method to human behavior in order to improve society – from individuals, to small groups, at cultural and societal levels, cross-culturally and even looking at the entire world population.

Depending on the social science courses you take, key areas covered could include case study research, comparative research, content analysis, cost-benefit analysis, demographic analysis, historical research, predictive modeling, secondary data analysis, social assessment, social network analysis, and surveys.

Be a strong contender in the job market or in graduate school

The curriculum in our Social Sciences degree program provides you with a core set of skills that are valuable to employers in virtually any industry. You’ll improve your ability to function and communicate as part of team, think critically, and solve problems. This degree is also a strong fit for students striving to balance the strong interpersonal skills necessary for a service-oriented career with qualitative abilities and an enthusiasm for research.

Additionally, the Social Sciences major is well-suited for students interested in research, analysis, human resources, and other social science fields, as well as careers in military service and law enforcement.  

Thinking about graduate school? The analytical and research-oriented aspect of the courses offered in this program also make it a strong choice if you are interested in pursuing your master’s degree.

Tailor your education to your interests and career direction

The capstone or practicum course taken at the conclusion of your Social Sciences studies provides the ultimate level of customization and offers you a unique opportunity to apply your education in a true-to-life social science exercise. Not only will you showcase your learnings to date, but you’ll decide whether to complete your final project using a theoretical or applied approach.

The capstone course is the opportunity for you to demonstrate your cumulative knowledge in the program by developing, executing, and presenting a research project. The practicum course is the opportunity to apply your cumulative knowledge in the community through field experience

Earn your degree from a university built for busy adults

Earn your degree on your terms by taking classes 100% online or pursue available coursework at our Main Campus. Regionally accredited and nonprofit, Franklin was built from the ground-up to satisfy the needs of adult learners. Our seamless transfer process and team of academic advisors will help ease your transition to becoming a student, while our flexible course schedules help to balance your education with work, family, and life. Get started on your future today.

Read more >

Breanna M.

B.S. Social Sciences '20

"My academic courses have given me knowledge of human behavior which has provided me with the skills to conduct more effective communications."

How Social Sciences Works

Tailor your education to your interests and career direction by building a unique combination of skillsets that demonstrate a broad professional range and proven problem-solving abilities.

  1. During your capstone or practicum, you'll apply what you have learned throughout the program to a true-to-life social science exercise using a theoretical or applied approach.
  2. Customize your path by choosing courses from a variety of areas, including anthropology, psychology, business economics, criminal justice administration, or sociology.
  3. Establish a core set of skills that are valuable to employers in virtually any industry and can seamlessly translate into the specific discipline areas you choose.
  4. As with all Franklin majors, general education courses set the foundation for future learning.

Increase your employability with the Social Sciences program

The average person changes jobs 10 times in his or her career* and taking courses from different social science disciplines will broaden your skillset.


*According to statistics from the U.S. Department of Labor.

Curriculum & Course Descriptions

120 Semester Hours
Fundamental General Education
English Composition
ENG 120 - College Writing (4)

In this course, students acquire the writing competence necessary for conducting and presenting research. A variety of assignments, beginning with personal reflections, build upon one another, as students develop ideas that respond to, critique, and synthesize the positions of others. Students systematize and organize knowledge in ways that will help them in all of their courses. The course also emphasizes the elements of good writing style, appropriate grammar and mechanics, clarity of language, and logical and cohesive development. It culminates in submission of a documented research paper.

Mathematics
MATH 215 - Statistical Concepts (4)

This course introduces the student to statistics with business applications. The course covers both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics included are: measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion; graphical displays of data; linear regression; basic probability concepts; binomial and normal probability distributions; confidence intervals; and hypothesis testing. These topics will be covered using a basic knowledge of algebra and Microsoft Excel.

Choose either MATH 140 Introduction to Quantitative Reasoning or MATH 150 Fundamental Algebra as the prerequisite. Course can count as a University Elective.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
PSYC 110 - General Psychology (4)

A survey of the various fields of study comprising modern scientific psychology. The course examines the theories, research findings, and applications in each of the major areas of psychology, with the goal of providing students with practice information they can apply to their personal and professional lives. The topic areas covered in the course include learning and memory, motivation and emotion, human development, theories of personality, psychopathology, and social behavior.

OR SOCL 110 - Introduction to Sociology (4)

Sociology is the scientific study of group behavior - whether the groups are dyads, small groups, associations, bureaucracies, societies, publics, aggregates, social movements, or mobs, etc. This introductory course introduces the student to sociological principles and theoretical perspectives that facilitate understanding the norms, values, structure and process of the various types of groups into which people organize. The course focuses on applying the scientific method to studying social problems (e.g. poverty, crime, sexism and racism) and basic institutions (i.e. family, government, economy, religion, education). Students will develop their "sociological imagination" as a way of understanding what their lives are and can be in relation to the larger social forces at work in local, national, and international environments.

2 credits from the following types of courses:
Choose from the Anthropology, Geography, History, Political Science, Psychology, or Sociology disciplines. Courses must be from two different disciplines.

Science

6 credits from the following types of courses:
Two courses from the Science discipline. One course must have a lab component.

Arts & Humanities
HUMN 210 - Intro to Logic & Critical Thinking Skill (2)

The goal of this course is to help you improve as a critical, logical thinker. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. You will discover how to apply these valuable skills to your studies and everyday life, learning how to overcome obstacles to critical thinking, and how to avoid being deceived by means of misleading reasoning.

HUMN 211 - Intro to Ethical Analysis & Reasoning (2)

The goal of this course is to help you improve your ethical analysis and reasoning skills. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing ethical arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. In this course, you will discover how to apply the following questions to your job and everyday life. Why do we need ethics if we have laws to govern our behavior? Does the majority view determine what is ethical and what is not? Are feelings, desires, and preferences reliable ethical guides? Is it ever appropriate to criticize another individual's (or culture's) ethical judgment? Are people always responsible for their actions? Do human beings have a natural tendency to good, a natural tendency to evil? both? neither? Is there a single moral code that is binding on all people, at all times, and in all places?

2 credits from the following types of courses:
Choose from the Art, English Literature, Fine Arts, Humanities, Music, Philosophy, Religion or Theater disciplines.

Additional General Education
PF 121 - Basic Learning Strategies (2)

This course introduces students to the Franklin University community and provides strategies for successful transition to and participation in that community. Topics include University resources and procedures, strategies for advancing communication skills, the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments, and the development of an academic and career plan.

OR PF 321 - Learning Strategies (2)

This course prepares students to be successful lifelong learners both academically and in their chosen careers. Franklin courses require a high level of self-directed learning and focus on skills required in the workplace and the classroom that are easily transferable between the two environments. The course includes strategies for advancing communication skills, including the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments. The assignments and activities in the course are created to closely simulate teamwork found in the workplace.

COMM 150 - Interpersonal Communication (4)

By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking.

OR SPCH 100 - Speech Communication (4)

This public-speaking course emphasizes the fundamentals of extemporaneous speaking. Skill-building activities and assignments focus on research, organization, reasoning, style and delivery of presentations as well as listening and audience engagement.

PF 106 - Introduction to Spreadsheets (1)

This course focuses on using spreadsheets to solve business applications.

ANTH 215 - Cultural Anthropology (4)

This course exposes students to the principles, concepts, research methods, and applications of cultural anthropology. Students will be introduced to the wide range of variation in social and institutional arrangements found historically and cross-culturally. From language to gender roles, from bases of social stratification to causes and consequences of conformity, from the simpler life in foraging societies to the seeming-chaos in modern post-industrial societies: students will examine the enormous variation in solutions to the requisites of social life.

OR CJAD 210 - Intro to Criminal Justice Administration (4)

This is an introductory course designed to expose students to the various Major elements of the criminal justice system (police, courts, and corrections). Students will learn about the ways in which the various systems interact, the processing of offenders, the various forms of punishment and the alternatives to punishment. The future of the criminal justice system will also be discussed.

OR ECON 210 - Introduction to Microeconomics (4)

An introduction to economic theory involving the examination of how decision making by firms and individuals is shaped by economic forces. Emphasis is placed on demand, supply, market equilibrium analysis, and basic market structure models. The invisible hand as the driving force for economic decisions as well as market externalities are discussed. The class concentrates on providing a balanced approach to studying economic agents' behavior and the global implications and outcomes.

OR ECON 220 - Introduction to Macroeconomics (4)

An introduction to economic theory involving the basic underlying causes and principles of the operation of an economic system. Emphasis is placed on studying the economy as a whole. Issues of inflation, unemployment, taxation, business cycles and growth are discussed in the context of the global economic system.

OR POSC 204 - American Government (3)

An overview of the structure and function of the American governmental system, including the roles of the President, Congress, the Supreme Court, the news media, public opinion, and public interest groups in the political system.

OR SOCL 110 - Introduction to Sociology (4)

Sociology is the scientific study of group behavior - whether the groups are dyads, small groups, associations, bureaucracies, societies, publics, aggregates, social movements, or mobs, etc. This introductory course introduces the student to sociological principles and theoretical perspectives that facilitate understanding the norms, values, structure and process of the various types of groups into which people organize. The course focuses on applying the scientific method to studying social problems (e.g. poverty, crime, sexism and racism) and basic institutions (i.e. family, government, economy, religion, education). Students will develop their "sociological imagination" as a way of understanding what their lives are and can be in relation to the larger social forces at work in local, national, and international environments.

2 credits from the following types of courses:
Any General Education course at the 100 or 200 level

Major Area Required
COMM 335 - Communication in Groups and Teams (4)

The course examines current theories and best practices of working collaboratively in professional contexts. Students apply these concepts to analyze their own work experience, generating strategies for how to improve their performance in work groups. Students will learn basic project management skills and work in online virtual teams to complete a final communication project.

SOCL 335 - Applied Research Methods (4)

Applied Research Methods introduces students to the basic research designs and data collection techniques involved in human subjects’ research common to social research environments. After completion of this course, the student should know the basics of social research ethics, the steps of the research process, the strengths and weaknesses of selected types of qualitative and quantitative research strategies, issues of selecting or creating and refining instruments of measurement, how to properly select an appropriate sample of subjects, and how to interpret selected statistical measures utilized in hypothesis testing.

HUMN 345 - Philosophy of Science (4)

The goal of this course is to help students sharpen their critical thinking skills by covering key principles of knowledge, reasoning, and evidence. Students will be introduced to the characteristics, methodology, and limitations of science in contrast to other alleged sources of knowledge like faith, intuition, mysticism, perception, introspection, memory, and reason. Students will discover how to apply these valuable principles to their studies and to everyday life, learning how to overcome obstacles to critical thinking and how to avoid being deceived by means of bogus sciences and extraordinary claims.

HUMN 301 - Creative Thinking (4)

Creativity and innovation are essential for organizations to thrive. Design thinking has become central to problem solving in our organizations and our communities. In this course you will explore and expand your own creativity through a self-selected project and apply design thinking to a specific organizational or community-based issue. This course includes concrete exercises to reignite imagination and encourage creative problem solving and creative thinking.

SOSC 495 - Psychology & Social Sciences Practicum (4)

This course provides a culminating, integrative experience for all Psychology and Social Sciences majors. The purpose is to provide an opportunity for students to demonstrate their mastery of the learning outcomes associated with the major. Students will self-select a practicum field experience that can be completed within the duration of the course that will provide evidence of their subject matter learning, as well as provide a benefit to themselves and a participating organization.

OR PSYC 495 - Psychology & Soc Scie Capstone (4)

This course provides a culminating, integrative experience for all Psychology and Social Science majors. The purpose is to provide an opportunity for students to demonstrate their mastery of the learning outcomes associated with the major. Students will self-select a capstone project that can be completed within the duration of the course that will provide evidence of their subject matter learning as well as provide a benefit to themselves and a participating organization.

ENG 205 - Business & Professional Writing (4)

This is an intermediate composition course focusing on writing for business and professional purposes. Students will review the writing conventions commonly expected within business and professional environments, as well as strategies for analyzing rhetorical situations within those environments. Coursework includes analysis, revision, and research exercises, as well as substantial practice in composing business correspondence. The final project is an extensive, researched business proposal developed in stages and presented to the class. Students will be encouraged to relate course materials to their major programs and workplace experiences.

OR ENG 220 - Research Writing: Exploring Professional Identities (4)

This is an intermediate course focusing on the composition of research papers. Students in this course prepare to be active participants in professional discourse communities by examining and practicing the writing conventions associated with their own fields of study and work. By calling attention to the conventions of disciplinary writing, the course also prepares students for upper-division college writing and the special conventions of advanced academic discourse. Course activities include three extended research papers, semi-formal writing addressing interdisciplinary communication, and readings fostering critical engagement with disciplinary conversations.

Major Electives

32 credits from the following subjects: ANTH, CJAD, ECON, PSYC, SOCL

Courses selected must be from at least two social and behavioral science disciplines.

Additional social and behavioral science disciplines acceptable for transfer include: Anthropology, Archaeology, Cultural Resources Management, Criminology, Geography, History, International Relations, Political Science, Statistics and Decision Science. Other social science disciplines not listed above may be accepted for transfer. Inquiries should be directed to the Social Sciences program chair.

University Electives

26 credits from the following types of courses:
Any undergraduate courses offered by the University except developmental education courses.

Additional Requirements

All students are required to pass College Writing (ENG 120), and either Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121) or Learning Strategies (PF 321) prior to enrolling in any course at the 200 level or above. Students who enroll at Franklin with 30 or fewer hours of transfer credit are required to pass PF 121 Basic Learning Strategies in place of PF 321 Learning Strategies. Interpersonal Communication (COMM 150) or Speech Communication (SPCH 100) must be taken prior to enrolling in any course at the 300 level or above. Students must also meet the University algebra competency requirement.

Program Details

Request Free Information!

Want to learn more about Franklin University? Complete the simple form - it just takes a minute!

  • Invest in yourself by finishing your degree.

  • Take classes online, on campus, or both.

  • Finish faster. Save more. Franklin fits your life.

  • Top employers hire Franklin grads to provide relevant industry knowledge.

Request Information

In submitting my contact information, I understand that I will receive phone calls, text messages and email about attending Franklin University. I may opt out of these communications at any time.

Your privacy is important to us. Privacy Policy
Loading...

Employment Outlook

7%

From 2021-2031, jobs in Social Sciences are expected to increase by 7%.

All Occupations

2021
2,312,050 jobs
2031
2,468,403 jobs
Show Details >

Environmental Scientists and Specialists, Including Health

2021
89,119 jobs
2031
97,741 jobs

Economists

2021
20,666 jobs
2031
23,105 jobs

Sociologists

2021
3,285 jobs
2031
3,394 jobs

Anthropologists and Archeologists

2021
9,918 jobs
2031
10,938 jobs

Political Scientists

2021
8,807 jobs
2031
9,297 jobs

Social Scientists and Related Workers, All Other

2021
42,001 jobs
2031
43,668 jobs


Source information provided by Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI).

Frequently Asked Questions

Back to College Blog

Related Programs