Skip to main content
B.S. Operations & Supply Chain Management

Keep your career on track with a supply chain management degree

When Sam Walton introduced his grocery-goods chain to deep discounting, he took Wal-Mart from five-and-dime to global megacorp. How? With a lean and efficient supply chain. Sam found that a small thing done well can add up to a big advantage. Today, companies large and small are looking for that same gain. Let Franklin’s B.S. Operations & Supply Chain Management degree program help you become an execution-oriented professional with the know-how to deliver.

Program not available in

On Site

IACBE Accredited

Our program follows best-practice standards for business education.

Real-World Practitioners

Learn from experienced business professionals.

100% Online Classes

Earn your degree around your schedule.

Contemporary Curriculum

Learn about growing and green global issues.

Accredited Online University

Nearly 80% of our students take online courses.

In-Demand Skills

Learn from a leader in preparing working adults for career advancement.

Program Overview

Supply competitive edge with efficient end-to-end execution

Franklin’s transfer-friendly Operations & Supply Chain Management degree program prepares you to get it done. You’ll learn what it takes behind the scenes to streamline every step from raw material to consumption so you can make a real difference to the customer out front.

Along the way, you’ll acquire a set of highly sought-after skills in the areas of demand planning, quality management, procurement, supply chain optimization, strategic sourcing, transportation and logistics, and materials and inventory management. And because our Supply Chain degree program is accredited by the International Accreditation Council for Business Education (IACBE), the leader in outcomes-based accreditation in business, you know you’re earning a respected degree with value in the workplace.

Manage your end-to-end success with our highly relevant curriculum

You’ll also learn how to handle growing global issues, such as meeting developing countries’ need for goods while overcoming such barriers as dwindling natural resources and insufficient supply chain infrastructure.

Franklin’s Supply Chain bachelor's degree program coursework will expose you to in-demand quality management methods, such as Six Sigma, Total Quality Management (TQM), and Theory of Constraints (TOC) and production practices like Lean and Just-in-time (JIT). You’ll learn how to direct transportation, logistics, outsourcing, and other operations functions while you deepen your skills in managing projects and programs.

Because Franklin’s curriculum addresses relevant issues and trends facing the industry, you’ll be amply prepared to tackle key issues while bringing thought leadership to the table. For example, our curriculum teaches you how to integrate environmental thinking throughout the supply chain, from green-friendly product design and material sourcing to responsible end-of-life management.

Get hands-on learning from instructors with real-world experience

Franklin’s Supply Chain Management degree program goes beyond just theory, too. You’ll gain practical experience through hands-on project assignments, such as the capstone project in which you’ll research and develop an end-to-end plan to produce and deliver a product.

With credentialed practitioners providing instruction and an Advisory Board comprised of VPs and Division heads of Fortune 500 companies, such as Cardinal Health and UPS, you will have access to some of the best talent and experience in the industry. Plus, you can choose to gain additional insights from networking with members of professional societies like Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) and Association for Operations Management (APICS).

Earn your degree from a university built for busy adults

Earn your degree on your terms by taking classes 100% online or pursue available coursework at one of our Midwest locations. Regionally accredited and nonprofit, Franklin was built from the ground-up to satisfy the needs of adult learners. Our seamless transfer process and team of academic advisors will help ease your transition to becoming a student, while our flexible course schedules help to balance your education with work, family, and life. Get started on your future today.

Read more >

Curriculum & Course Descriptions

126 Semester Hours
Fundamental General Education Core (24 hours)
English Composition

Choose a minimum of 3 semester hours from:

WRIT 120 - COLLEGE WRITING (4)
In this course, students acquire the writing competence necessary for conducting and presenting research. A variety of assignments, beginning with personal reflections, build upon one another, as students develop ideas that respond to, critique, and synthesize the positions of others. Students systematize and organize knowledge in ways that will help them in all of their courses. The course also emphasizes the elements of good writing style, appropriate grammar and mechanics, clarity of language, and logical and cohesive development. It culminates in submission of a documented research paper.

*If the course does not have a research paper component, WRIT 130 Research Paper, two semester credits, is also required.

Mathematics

Choose a minimum of three semester hours from:

MATH 215 - STATISTICAL CONCEPTS (4)
This course introduces the student to statistics with business applications. The course covers both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics included are: measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion; graphical displays of data; linear regression; basic probability concepts; binomial and normal probability distributions; confidence intervals; and hypothesis testing. These topics will be covered using a basic knowledge of algebra and Microsoft Excel. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.

Choose either MATH 115 Introduction to Quantitative Reasoning or MATH 150 Fundamental Algebra as the prerequisite. Both courses can count as a general education or University elective.

*At least one mathematics or statistics course beyond the level of intermediate algebra.

Sciences

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

SCIE 210 - UNDERSTANDING SCIENCE: PRINCIPLES, PRACTICE, & THEORY (2)
Understanding Science: Principles, Practice & Theory is a two credit hour course that introduces students to the major themes, processes, and methods common to all scientific disciplines. Students will develop critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate all kinds of phenomena, scientific, pseudoscientific, and other. The focus is on the nature of science so students will develop an understanding of how science works and develop an appreciation for the process by which we gain scientific knowledge.
SCIE 211 - INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC ANALYSIS & REASONING (4)
Introduction to Scientific Analysis and Reasoning is a four credit hour course consisting of three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of laboratory. This course is an introduction to critical thinking on statistical and scientific claims. The student will develop the critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate popular sources of (mis)information and to better understand and evaluate all sorts of scientific claims and arguments. The focus of the course is on students developing thoughtful and critical use of scientific information and research to be able to separate truth from deception and make decisions that affect their personal lives and roles as informed and engaged citizens.

*Two science courses, with one having a laboratory component.

Arts and Humanities

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

HUMN 211 - INTRO TO ETHICAL ANALYSIS AND REASONING (2)
The goal of this course is to help you improve your ethical analysis and reasoning skills. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing ethical arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. In this course, you will discover how to apply the following questions to your job and everyday life. Why do we need ethics if we have laws to govern our behavior' Does the majority view determine what is ethical and what is not' Are feelings, desires, and preferences reliable ethical guides' Is it ever appropriate to criticize another individual's (or culture's) ethical judgment' Are people always responsible for their actions' Do human beings have a natural tendency to good, a natural tendency to evil' both' neither' Is there a single moral code that is binding on all people, at all times, and in all places'

Choose additional coursework from the Humanities discipline.

Additional General Education Requirements (12 hours)
COMP 106 - INTRODUCTION TO SPREADSHEETS (1)
This course focuses on using spreadsheets to solve business applications.
COMP 108 - INTRODUCTION TO DATABASES (1)
This course focuses on using databases to solve business applications.
PF 321 - LEARNING STRATEGIES (2)
This course prepares students to be successful lifelong learners both academically and in their chosen careers. Franklin courses require a high level of self-directed learning and focus on skills required in the workplace and the classroom that are easily transferable between the two environments. The course includes strategies for advancing communication skills, including the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments. The assignments and activities in the course are created to closely simulate teamwork found in the workplace.
COMM 150 - INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION (4)
By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
OR SPCH 100 - SPEECH COMMUNICATION (4)
A basic public speaking course intended to improve the student's ability to think critically and to communicate orally. Theory and practice are provided in various speaking situations. Each student is required to speak before an audience, but class work also involves reading, gathering and organizing information, writing and listening.
WRIT 320 - BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WRITING (4)
This is an advanced composition course that focuses on writing for business and professional purposes. Students will review the writing conventions commonly expected within business and professional environments, as well as strategies for analyzing rhetorical situations within those environments. Coursework includes analysis, revision, and research exercises, as well as substantial practice in composing business correspondence. The final project is an extensive, researched business proposal developed in stages and presented to the class. Students will be encouraged to relate course materials to their major programs and workplace experiences.
Business Core (28 hours)
ACCT 215 - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (4)
An introduction to accounting emphasizing how general purpose financial statements communicate information about the business corporation's performance and position for users external to management. Approximately one third of the course emphasizes how the accountant processes and presents the information and includes exposure to recording transactions, adjusting balances and preparing financial statements for service and merchandise firms according to established rules and procedures. The balance of the course examines major elements of the statements such as cash, receivables, inventory, long'lived assets, depreciation, payroll, bonds, and other liabilities and stocks. Concepts of this course are applied to Managerial Accounting (ACCT 225). Students are advised to avoid any time lapse between these courses.
ACCT 225 - MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (4)
The study of management accounting for internal reporting and decision-making. The course introduces a business-management approach to the development and use of accounting information. Major topics include cost behavior, cost analysis, profit planning and control measures. Accounting for decentralized operations, capital budgeting decisions, and ethical challenges in managerial accounting are also covered.
BSAD 220 - BUSINESS LAW (4)
A study of the everyday legal problems encountered in business with emphasis on the areas of legal procedure, contracts, agency, employment law, business organizations and torts, with cases relating to these and other areas.
ECON 210 - INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS (4)
An introduction to economic theory involving the examination of how decision making by firms and individuals is shaped by economic forces. Emphasis is placed on demand, supply, market equilibrium analysis, and basic market structure models. The invisible hand as the driving force for economic decisions as well as market externalities are discussed. The class concentrates on providing a balanced approach to studying economic agents' behavior and the global implications and outcomes.
FINA 301 - PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE (4)
This course is designed to survey the field of finance and provide the foundation for more advanced finance coursework. Topics include sources of business and financial information, financial statement analysis, the time value of money, the nature and measurement of risk, financial institutions, investments and corporate finance.
MGMT 312 - PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (4)
This course explores the basic concepts and processes of management. Students will explore the functional roles and processes of planning, leading, organizing, and controlling comprising the manager role. Students develop skills related to the manager function that are required in today's competitive environment.
MKTG 300 - MARKETING (4)
Theory, strategies and methods are foundational to the informed practice of marketing. Students investigate the importance of marketing to an organization or cause, the interrelationship of the difference phases of marketing, the marketing of goods versus services, analysis and identification of markets, pricing strategies and digital marketing tactics. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
University Electives (22 hours)

Any undergraduate courses offered by the University except developmental education courses.

Major Area (40 hours)
BSAD 320 - QUANTITATIVE & QUALITATIVE METHODS FOR DECISION MAKING (4)
This course focuses on the development of individual and team decision-making and problem solving skills. Real world domestic and global issues will be analyzed, diagnosed, and evaluated through the application of a variety of quantitative and qualitative tools and techniques used to arrive at effective decisions and solutions.
MGMT 325 - ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR (4)
This course focuses on the organizational processes and theoretical constructs related to organizational behavior. The roles of leaders, followers, and teams and their influence on the culture and performance of an organization are addressed through the analysis of key organizational behavior concepts and related cases. Topics will include: values, perception, attitudes, assumptions, learning, motivation, conflict, diversity, and change. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
OSCM 378 - BUSINESS MODELING (4)
This course provides the foundations of quantitative analysis methods used in business and operations management problems. Students will be able to develop analytical skills in modeling and analysis of problems faced by business and operations managers. Some of the topics covered are: linear programming, network and transportation analysis, queuing models and simulation.
OSCM 390 - OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (4)
This course instructs students on how manufacturing and service operations contribute to organizational strategy. Concepts such as productivity, economies of scale, vertical and horizontal integration, and push vs. pull will be explained. Implications of applying "Green" policies to materials and processes will be explained.
OSCM 440 - QUALITY MANAGEMENT (4)
This course provides students with understanding and knowledge of the philosophies and methods used to improve effectiveness and efficiency of organizational processes. Quality concepts from Juran and Deming will be discussed along with more current quality concepts such as six-sigma, black-belt quality associates, and total quality management (TQM). In addition, issues applying quality concepts to global companies will be explained.
OSCM 450 - SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT (4)
This course will expose students to topics related to design and management of supply chains, from incoming raw materials to final product delivery. Course topics will include supply chain network design, facility planning, capacity planning, globalization and outsourcing, information technology, and global issues in supply chain management.
OSCM 455 - TRANSPORTATION AND LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT (4)
This course explores the transportation and logistics concepts within supply chains. Topics covered will include tools and techniques used in the design and operation of transportation and logistics systems and global issues in transportation and logistics management. In addition, "Quick Response" scenarios used to handle transportation and logistics issues, in the event of natural and non-natural disasters, will be explained.
OSCM 458 - PURCHASING AND INVENTORY MANAGEMENT (4)
This course will provide students with the concepts of purchasing and inventory management. Topics covered are purchasing and inventory planning processes, supplier selection, contract negotiations, "Green" policies, and procurement.
OSCM 491 - INTEGRATED PROJECT MANAGEMENT (4)
This course will instruct the student to manage multiple organizations and projects. Concepts on how to deal with organizational obstacles, risk, and project development will be covered.
OSCM 495 - OPERATIONS & SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT CAPSTONE (4)
This course will provide the student with a cumulative experience for the Operations and Supply Chain Management major. The student will use all the knowledge gained in the previous classes on operations management, supply chain management, quality, transportation, and purchasing in developing operational strategies for real-life applications.
Additional Requirements

All students are required to pass College Writing (WRIT 120), either Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121) or Learning Strategies (PF 321) and either Speech Communication (SPCH 100) or Interpersonal Communication (COMM 150) prior to enrolling in any other course at the 200 level or above. Either PF 121 or PF 321 must be taken prior to the first BLF course, or it may be taken concurrently with the first 15-week BLF course. Students who enroll at Franklin with 30 or fewer hours of transfer credit are required to pass Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121) in place of Learning Strategies (PF 321). Students must also meet the University algebra competency requirement.

Request Free Information!

Want to learn more about Franklin University? Complete the simple form - it just takes a minute!

  • Invest in yourself by finishing your degree.

  • Take classes online, on campus, or both.

  • Finish faster. Save more. Franklin fits your life.

  • Top employers hire Franklin grads to provide relevant industry knowledge.

Request Information

I acknowledge that by submitting this form, I may be contacted by telephone and email.

Your privacy is important to us. Privacy Policy

Program Details

Career Opportunities

Chief Operating Officer

Chief Operating Officers oversee an organization’s day-to-day operations, including production schedules, sales, marketing, personnel, and distribution.

Director of Operations

Directors of Operations ensure that staff successfully carry out business policies and imperatives.

Inventory Manager

Inventory Managers oversee the tracking and replenishing of merchandise in warehouse, stores, facilities, and food service establishments.

Logistics Manager

Logistics Managers oversee the work of teams responsible for receiving and/or delivering products, ensuring cost-efficient and effective transport and handling.

Product Manager

Product Managers determine product strengths and weaknesses, developing strategies to effectively promote the product.

Project Manager

Project Managers plan, execute and manage campaigns and initiatives, ensuring adequate resources, staffing and milestones to deliver anticipated results on time and within budget.

Procurement Manager

Procurement Managers handle the ordering of goods and services, including processing requests for purchases, locating suppliers and preparing invitations to bid.

Sales Manager

Sales Managers direct the business development activities of sales personnel, ensuring revenue targets are met or exceeded.

Supply Chain Manager

Supply Chain Managers direct the planning of procurement, production, inventory control, logistics, and distribution.

Transportation Manager

Transportation Managers hire, coach, supervise, and manage truck drivers, and supervise employees tasked with loading and unloading transport vehicles.

Employment Outlook

Computer and Information Systems Managers

2015
11,651 jobs
2025
14,046 jobs

First-Line Supervisors of Mechanics, Installers, and Repairers

2015
13,794 jobs
2025
15,186 jobs

Logisticians

2015
3,018 jobs
2025
3,274 jobs

Gaming Supervisors

2015
932 jobs
2025
971 jobs

First-Line Supervisors of Personal Service Workers

2015
6,570 jobs
2025
7,688 jobs

First-Line Supervisors of Helpers, Hand Laborers and Material Movers

2015
7,687 jobs
2025
8,407 jobs

First-Line Supervisors of Transportation and Material-Moving Machine and Vehicle Operators

2015
8,604 jobs
2025
9,424 jobs

Aircraft Cargo Handling Supervisors

2015
269 jobs
2025
299 jobs

Construction Managers

2015
6,132 jobs
2025
6,832 jobs


Source information provided by Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) - June 2016

Knowledge & Skillsets

Gain in-demand skills sought by employers with curriculum that teaches you:

Frequently Asked Questions

Back to College Blog