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Master of Public Administration (MPA)

Bring your passion to life with a master's in public administration

Government and nonprofit positions account for one-quarter of all American jobs. What attracts such large numbers? The potential impact the work has on people. Yet no mission-oriented institution can do without a leader to drive change and empower transformation. Our Master of Public Administration prepares you to take on public administration leadership much the same way an MBA prepares a business executive. Choose the program that helps you advance community interest -- and your career.

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On Site

Customizable Program

Enrich your MPA with your choice of electives.

17-Month Completion

Finish your MPA faster.

No GMAT or GRE

Bypass expensive, time-consuming tests with a 2.75+ GPA.

Unique Leadership Focus

Learn management and leadership skills not taught by other programs.

Unique Curriculum

Learn decision-making and problem-solving skills not taught by other programs.

Proven Outcomes

96% of our graduates work in a PA-related position.

Program Overview

What can you do with a Master of Public Administration degree?

Government and nonprofit sector jobs account for an astonishing 25% of total U.S. employment. What attracts such large numbers to these organizations is the positive impact that their services can have on the public. At the center of these mission-oriented institutions are leaders driving change and empowering teams and volunteers to transform their communities.

The transfer-friendly Master of Public Administration (MPA) is the graduate degree program of choice for government and nonprofit organizations seeking leadership talent. Franklin's online MPA program equips you to tackle the specific leadership challenges faced by public administration professionals -- similar to the way an MBA prepares you for an executive position in business. You'll learn to create administrative plans, make management decisions, and achieve organizational goals for the advancement of community interest.

Prepare for a career as a government or nonprofit manager

Because Franklin offers a current, applied curriculum focused on preparing you to be a real-world practitioner, upon graduation you’ll be ready to enter the workforce and immediately take on the top issues facing government and nonprofit organizations. You’ll gain the skills employers look for in the areas of public and nonprofit leadership, organizational analysis, policy-making, budgeting and financial management, and personnel administration.

Our balanced curriculum teaches you both government and nonprofit skills and competencies, including navigating the political system from an organizational and professional perspective; real-world ethics and professionalism; critical thinking and process improvement; fundamental budgeting and financial analysis; and practical leadership skills. We also emphasize critical skills that are not addressed in most other programs, including methodological reasoning, strategic organizational communication, and applied analytical techniques for decision making and problem solving.

At Franklin, you’ll also be engaged in case studies and simulations, giving you incredibly valuable experience in management decision-making, financial analysis, and management.

Customize your MPA to align with your desired functional area

In addition to a curriculum overseen by an expert Advisory Board comprised of nonprofit CEOs, governmental officials, and community leaders, such as former Columbus mayor Greg Lashutka, you can enrich your Master's in Public Administration degree by choosing to take two elective courses to develop expertise in any of Franklin's graduate programs including Criminal Justice Administration, Healthcare Administration, or Human Resource Management.

Franklin is a member of the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA), a mark of our commitment to provide you with a public administration education of excellence and quality.

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Curriculum & Course Descriptions

40 Semester Hours
Core Courses (32 hours)
PUAD 701 - FOUNDATIONS OF GOVERNMENT & NONPROFIT ADMINISTRATION (4)
Students examine fundamental public service values that differentiate the mission and purpose of government and nonprofit organizations from those of private, for-profit, organizations. The course focuses on applying public administration and organizational theories to analyze administrative problems faced by leaders and managers implementing government and nonprofit programs. Students learn to think systematically about selecting alternative options for delivering programs and improving organizational performance. Finally, students develop fundamental information literacy, computing, writing, and presentation skills required for effective academic and professional communication.
PUAD 710 - MANAGING PERSONNEL & INFORMATION SYSTEMS (4)
Students learn fundamental concepts and tools for managing the two most important organizational resources - people and information. The course emphasizes application of human resources concepts and tools for attracting, retaining, and developing employees and improving organizational performance in government and nonprofit organizations. Information technology concepts and tools for managing government and nonprofit organizations are also examined. Fundamental legal, ethical, and political obligations for managing human resources and information technology are also evaluated.
PUAD 715 - METHODOLOGICAL REASONING AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS (4)
Students learn to apply fundamental methodological concepts and analytical tools necessary for contributing to administrative and policy discussions, critically assessing causal claims, and making informed administrative and policy decisions. The goal is to have students become critical consumers of academic research and professional reports and confidently apply statistical concepts and techniques for professional decision-making. Finally, students develop skills for effectively communicating analysis methods and conclusions with colleagues, elected officials, the media, and the public.
PUAD 725 - MANAGEMENT DECISION MAKING METHODS (4)
Students learn fundamental concepts and tools for systematically analyzing administrative problems and making decisions that improve organizational performance. Specific techniques for analyzing common administrative problems are learned and the relevance of accounting for public values in such analyses is examined. Students also learn to use project management tools for effectively managing administrative projects. Finally, students develop skills for effectively communicating management analysis methods and conclusions with colleagues, elected officials, the media, and the public.
PUAD 740 - FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT AND BUDGETING (4)
Students learn to use fundamental budgeting, accounting, and financial management concepts and tools necessary for leading and managing government and nonprofit organizations. Students learn to use analytical techniques for making administrative and policy decisions with significant financial implications. Students also examine the competing values and politics that underlie and impact financial decisions in the government and nonprofit organizations. Finally, students develop skills for effectively communicating financial analysis methods and conclusions with colleagues, elected officials, the media, and the public.
PUAD 745 - STRATEGY, COLLABORATION AND COMMUNICATION (4)
Students learn to think strategically about leading organizations operating in a competitive political environment where collaboration is required to advance the organizational mission. The course focuses on using strategic and network management concepts and tools to improve organizational performance. The importance of strategically managing organizational communication is also examined. Finally, students develop skills for effectively communicating strategic planning methods, approaches, and decisions with colleagues, elected officials, the media, and the public.
PUAD 750 - LEADING GOVERNMENT & NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS (4)
Students learn to think and act as ethical leaders within a public service context. The course focuses on putting administrative decisions and organizational plans into action. Students learn to use leadership concepts and tools and interpersonal skills for working with individuals and groups to effectively execute administrative plans and make decisions. Students also develop knowledge and skills for communicating and collaborating with internal and external stakeholders; particularly elected officials, the media, interest groups, and the public.
PUAD 790 - PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION CAPSTONE (4)
Students use the public administration concepts and tools learned in prior courses to analyze an important administrative or policy implementation problem and propose a course of action for effectively addressing it. The course emphasizes applying relevant concepts and tools to analyze the problem and then synthesizing the conclusions to create a written analysis and proposal for addressing the problem.
Electives (8 hours)

Students must complete PUAD 701, PUAD 740, and PUAD 715 before taking elective courses. Students may take any graduate courses offered at Franklin to meet the elective requirement, except for graduate capstone courses. Students must meet the prerequisite requirements for any graduate elective course or must obtain approval of the appropriate program chair to admit them into the course by waiving any prerequisite requirements.

Suggested Pathways:
Select 8 hours from any of the following courses, or select another graduate elective course:

Criminal Justice Administration
CJAD 720 - CRIMINOLOGY THEORY AND SOLUTIONS TO CRIME (4)
Students will evaluate contemporary criminology theories and apply them to formulate prevention, treatment, and crime control models, within a framework of cultural diversity. Crime data relationships and patterns will also be integrated with biological, psychological, and sociological theories of criminal behavior in a critical evaluation of contemporary criminological theories. Policy formation and implementation will also be addressed.
CJAD 730 - ADULT & JUVENILE PENOLOGY (4)
Students evaluate contemporary prison and punishment models and theories of punishment. Students compare and contrast prison systems and develop solutions to penology challenges, such as overcrowding and the detrimental impacts of prison life. Finally, students analyze penal administration and accountability.
OR CJAD 740 - STRATEGIC POLICING & CONTEMPORARY CRIME CONTROL STRATEGIES (4)
Students will learn how policing strategies are developed, tested, implemented and evaluated in a democratic society. Evidence-based practice will be explored against innovative policing tactics and the evolving policy and political dynamic at play. Students will learn how policy issues are framed, identify participants in the policy process, and discover how policy is created. Students will examine the usefulness and strategic implications of COMPSTAT, community policing, intelligence led policing, and transnational cybercrime.
CJAD 740 - STRATEGIC POLICING & CONTEMPORARY CRIME CONTROL STRATEGIES (4)
Students will learn how policing strategies are developed, tested, implemented and evaluated in a democratic society. Evidence-based practice will be explored against innovative policing tactics and the evolving policy and political dynamic at play. Students will learn how policy issues are framed, identify participants in the policy process, and discover how policy is created. Students will examine the usefulness and strategic implications of COMPSTAT, community policing, intelligence led policing, and transnational cybercrime.
Healthcare Administration
HCM 735 - HEALTHCARE DELIVERY SYSTEMS (4)
The course provides an extensive overview of leadership in the U.S. health services system. The focus of the course will be on the role health services leadership plays in the delivery of healthcare services, to include managing with professionals, financial management, services utilization, and other aspects of the U.S. healthcare system. The student will explore the key theoretical and practical elements of leadership as well as current issues clarifying how the U.S. health services system is organized, managed, and financed.
HCM 742 - HEALTHCARE LAWS AND ETHICS (4)
In this course the student will develop a strong foundation of health law, enabling them to deal with common legal and practical moral and ethical issues facing the healthcare organization on a daily basis. Topics will include statutory laws, rules and regulations, review of tort laws, criminal law, contract law, civil procedures and trial practice. The student will examine numerous legal, moral, and ethical issues.
HCM 752 - HEALTH POLICY (4)
This course will explore the essential conceptual and analytical understanding of health policymaking and politics, including their impact on health administration and leadership. Selected policy issues will be explored through the application of political concepts and behavioral models, including a system model of policymaking. The emphasis will be on understanding the health leaders approach to the policymaking system, become involved in it, and work through it to attain their objectives and those of their organization.
Human Resource Management
HRM 701 - HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (4)
This course provides a framework for an in-depth understanding of day-to-day, practical approaches/aspects of problems/challenges that impact the human resource management field. Topics include recruiting, hiring, training, retaining, rewarding, and promoting employees; compensation and benefits; employment planning, performance management systems, and succession planning; labor relations; and managing organizational relationships.
HRM 702 - EMPLOYEE RIGHTS, RESPONSIBILITIES, AND DISCIPLINE (4)
The primary purpose of this course is to introduce the principle theories and practices in the area of employment and workplace law. Topics include the federal and state laws associated with hiring, firing and discipline, medical leave (including FMLA, ADA and worker's compensation), discrimination, harassment, immigration, labor law, unemployment compensation, workplace privacy. Additional topics may include workplace investigations, workplace violence and employment-related legal processes, including EEOC Charges and lawsuits.
HRM 703 - LABOR RELATIONS: PROCESS AND LAW (4)
This course examines employment relations from a historical perspective including the creation and rise of unionism, the evolution of collective bargaining, recent civil rights acts affecting the workplace, and concludes by envisioning what the future may hold regarding employee, employer relations. Topics include the role and responsibilities of the HR manager with regard to employment relations, the legal framework of contract negotiations and administration through the lens of the National Labor Relations act and strategies and tactics used for union avoidance. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.

Program Details

Employment Outlook

Chief Executives

2015
5,337 jobs
2025
5,537 jobs

General and Operations Managers

2015
83,437 jobs
2025
93,825 jobs

Administrative Services Managers

2015
9,067 jobs
2025
10,236 jobs

Transportation, Storage, and Distribution Managers

2015
3,493 jobs
2025
3,834 jobs

Social and Community Service Managers

2015
5,801 jobs
2025
6,784 jobs

Managers, All Other

2015
11,931 jobs
2025
12,922 jobs

Emergency Management Directors

2015
151 jobs
2025
164 jobs

Legislators

2015
1,258 jobs
2025
1,321 jobs


Source information provided by Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) - June 2016

Knowledge & Skillsets

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