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Courses & Admissions

Career-Focused Programs

Whether you’re intent on chasing a career dream you’ve had forever, or maybe you can’t seem to commit to one idea, you can still benefit from the Franklin University/Urbana CCP pathway options. Pathway options can help you jump-start your college career or provide an opportunity for you to test-drive some options so you’ll be able to make an informed decision later on.

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Find Your Path

Because we’re committed to helping students realize the best possible return on investment for their college education, we’ve identified some of the fastest-growing careers and created academic pathways that successfully prepare students to assume in-demand roles. The pathways are comprised of about 30 hours of coursework that is transferable toward associate and bachelor’s degrees at  Franklin University/Urbana.

Criminal Justice Administration

The criminal justice pathway allows students to discover how theory and practice are interconnected. Courses in criminology, juvenile justice, victimology, deviance, case management, corrections, policing and more equip students for careers in probation, parole, law enforcement, security, correctional facilities and case management.

CJAD 210 - Intro to Criminal Justice Administration (4)
This is an introductory course designed to expose students to the various Major elements of the criminal justice system (police, courts, and corrections). Students will learn about the ways in which the various systems interact, the processing of offenders, the various forms of punishment and the alternatives to punishment. The future of the criminal justice system will also be discussed.
CJAD 240 - Introduction to Criminology (4)
This course will focus on theories of crime and types of offending. Topics related the causation, control and prevention of criminal behavior will be addressed in this course.
CJAD 310 - Courts and Criminal Procedure (4)
This course addresses the requirements for processing criminal offenders through the court system. Topics include structure of the court system in the U.S., evidentiary standards, constitutional protections, the role and importance of case law, and the role of the prosecutor and defense attorney in the courts.
CJAD 315 - Policing in America (4)
This course will provide the student with an overview of the philosophy and history of policing in America. Students will learn about personnel and management issues related to policing. Students will also be exposed to topics including police discretion, police use of force, civil liability, police culture, and the impact of the war on terrorism on police operations and practices.
HUMN 211 - Intro to Ethical Analysis & Reasoning Reasoning (2)
The goal of this course is to help you improve your ethical analysis and reasoning skills. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing ethical arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. In this course, you will discover how to apply the following questions to your job and everyday life. Why do we need ethics if we have laws to govern our behavior' Does the majority view determine what is ethical and what is not' Are feelings, desires, and preferences reliable ethical guides' Is it ever appropriate to criticize another individual's (or culture's) ethical judgment' Are people always responsible for their actions' Do human beings have a natural tendency to good, a natural tendency to evil' both' neither' Is there a single moral code that is binding on all people, at all times, and in all places'
PF 121 - Basic Learning Strategies (2)
This course introduces students to the Franklin University community and provides strategies for successful transition to and participation in that community. Topics include University resources and procedures, strategies for advancing communication skills, the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments, and the development of an academic and career plan.
COMM 150 - Interpersonal Communication (4)
By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
Cybersecurity

Forbes magazine estimates that there are 1 million open cybersecurity positions, and that is projected to grow to 3.5 million unfilled positions in the next 5 years. With a cybersecurity analyst median salary topping $92,000, this rewarding field can be quite profitable as well. We’ve developed a curriculum that addresses the challenging, stimulating and purposeful work in cybersecurity, taught by industry professionals.

COMP 101 - Problem Solving With Computing (2)
Many organizations today utilize computers and information systems to store, organize, analyze, and summarize data to solve problems. As a result, computing is a tool that can benefit students in many different fields. At the heart of solving problems with computers is the study of structured thinking using algorithms. This course is designed for students with no prior programming experience and teaches the building blocks of algorithms, including variables, expressions, selection and repetition structures, functions and parameters, and array processing.
HUMN 211 - Intro to Ethical Analysis & Reasoning Reasoning (2)
The goal of this course is to help you improve your ethical analysis and reasoning skills. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing ethical arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. In this course, you will discover how to apply the following questions to your job and everyday life. Why do we need ethics if we have laws to govern our behavior' Does the majority view determine what is ethical and what is not' Are feelings, desires, and preferences reliable ethical guides' Is it ever appropriate to criticize another individual's (or culture's) ethical judgment' Are people always responsible for their actions' Do human beings have a natural tendency to good, a natural tendency to evil' both' neither' Is there a single moral code that is binding on all people, at all times, and in all places'
ISEC 200 - Cyber Security Fundamentals (2)
The Internet has changed dramatically; so have the activities that are dependent on it in some shape or form. Understanding the need for security, it's influence on people, businesses and society, as well as business drivers is critical. The course also covers malicious attacks, threats and vulnerabilities common to the world of security, as well as access controls, and methods to assess and respond to risks. Hands-on labs accompany the various concepts that are taught.
MATH 150 - Fundamental Algebra (4)
This course will address the outcomes of introductory and intermediate algebra. Topics include: basic algebraic properties, integers, simplifying and factoring polynomials, solving and graphing linear equations and inequalities, solving systems of equations in two variables, functions, rational expressions, quadratic and rational equations, absolute value, radicals, graphing systems of equations, and other selected topics. Applications will be emphasized, and numeric, algebraic, and graphical modes will be used. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
MATH 160 - College Algebra (4)
This course is designed to prepare students for Applied Calculus and Discrete Mathematics and to provide the mathematical background needed for the analytic reasoning used in other courses. Topics include functions and their graphs, including exponential and logarithmic functions; complex numbers; systems of equations and inequalities; matrices; basic principles of counting and probability; and other selected topics.
MIS 200 - Management Information Systems (4)
The purpose of this course is to provide the fundamentals associated with the management of information technology in a business enterprise. These fundamentals are business concepts in which the influence of information technology has caused change or brought about new concepts. Special emphasis will be placed on understanding the managerial issues that are relevant to usage of computers. The student will be given problems isolating these issues and will be asked to propose solutions with alternatives.
PF 121 - Basic Learning Strategies (2)
This course introduces students to the Franklin University community and provides strategies for successful transition to and participation in that community. Topics include University resources and procedures, strategies for advancing communication skills, the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments, and the development of an academic and career plan.
COMM 150 - Interpersonal Communication (4)
By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
WEBD 101 - Introduction to Web Page Construction (2)
This course covers the fundamental concepts necessary for the construction of web pages using the basic building blocks of Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (css). HTML and XHTML are covered in detail for building web pages using a web page development environment. The use of styling using css is introduced.
Education

Quality educators are always in high demand, and Urbana’s program is dedicated to producing the best teachers possible. Coursework will inspire aspiring-teachers to instill greatness in their future students. High school students who choose the education pathway will receive free books throughout their collegiate career when they transfer to Urbana.

EDUC 110 - Introduction to Education (2)
This survey course is an introduction to the teaching profession and is required for all students desiring to major in Education. Candidates engage in a variety of experiences that broadly explore the profession of education; purposes of schools in society; examines the state, federal and institutional standards that guide the profession; and the knowledge, dispositions, and performances required to be an effective teacher today.
EDUC 112 - Education in a Diverse Society (3)
This course explores the profession of education in the context of key social, political, and cultural issues, examines the historical origins of American public education, and discusses the role of educators in creating equality of opportunity for all students. Topics of discussion and analysis include individual differences; developing an educational atmosphere of respect; understanding student needs, and meeting the needs of diverse learners.
EDUC 250 - Instruc Planning Early Childhood Educ. (4)
This course is required for prospective teachers seeking the Resident Educator Early Childhood License. The course examines all aspects of instructional planning and examines the common strategies teachers employ to conduct their lessons. It assumes students have a deep understanding of the content they will teach and an extensive understanding and appreciation of the students with whom they will work. The overriding purpose of the course resides in the transformation of content and behavioral objectives into sequences of instructional activities that make them accessible to students.
OR EDUC 260 - Instruct Planning Middle Child Eduation (4)
This course is required for prospective teachers seeking the Resident Educator Middle Childhood License. The course examines all aspects of instructional planning and examines the common strategies teachers employ to conduct their lessons. It assumes prospective students have a deep understanding of the content they will teach and an extensive understanding and appreciation of the students with whom they will work. The overriding purpose of the course resides in the transformation of content and behavioral objectives into sequences of instructional activities that make them accessible to students.
OR EDUC 270 - Instructional Planning AYA Education (4)
This course is required for prospective teachers seeking the Resident Educator Adolescence to Young Adult License. The course examines all aspects of instructional planning and examines the common strategies teachers employ to conduct their lessons. It assumes prospective students have a deep understanding of the content they will teach and an extensive understanding and appreciation of the students with whom they work. The overriding purpose of the course resides in the transformation of content and behavioral objectives into sequences of instructional activities that make them accessible to students. The delivery of the Ohio model curriculum will be explored. All types of instructional technology will be utilized, including computer applications.
OR SED 260 - Instruct Plan/Delivery Str Intervention (3)
This course is required for prospective teachers seeking the Resident Educator Intervention Specialist License. The course examines all aspects of instructional planning and examines the common strategies teachers employ to conduct their lessons. It assumes prospective students have a deep understanding of the content they will teach and an extensive understanding and appreciation of the students with whom they will work. The overriding purpose of the course resides in the transformation of content and behavioral objectives into sequences of instructional activities that make them accessible to students. This course includes clinicals.
POSC 200 - Principles of Political Science (3)
An introduction to political theory, the basic concepts and terminology of the discipline with an analysis of power, conflict and its resolution, political institutions, and the decision-making process.
SED 200 - Intro Students Mild/Moderate Educ Need (3)
This course provides students the opportunity to develop an understanding of the philosophical, historical, and legal foundations of special education as well as an understanding of the characteristics of learners who have special needs. Students explore and define the concepts of special education in schools and society, acquire knowledge about the legal and procedural aspects of special education, and develop an understanding and respect for individual needs and diversity.
Entrepreneurship

The Franklin Entrepreneurship major focuses on developing and launching a new business enterprise, sourcing and organizing the required sources, and accepting both the risks and rewards associated with the venture. It draws upon key principles from management, marketing, finance and accounting to develop and refine entrepreneurial skills necessary for effective business creation.

BSAD 110 - Business Principles (4)
An introductory business course that helps students learn business terminology and provides preliminary study into the areas of economics, global business, ethics, business ownership, business management, human resource management, marketing, accounting and finance.
ENTR 395 - Foundations of Entrepreneurship (4)
Foundations of Entrepreneurship is an introductory course that examines the theory, practice, and tools of entrepreneurship. Various entrepreneurship structures and how such structures result in different unique pathways to success are explored. Students will focus on the importance of developing an entrepreneurial mindset as they assess their individual values and determine their affinity for entrepreneurial thinking, while also reviewing the risks and rewards of entrepreneurial businesses in the context of their chosen entrepreneurial philosophy. Finally, students will identify and evaluate opportunities for new ventures, and consider a strategic approach for successful business plan development.
HUMN 211 - Intro to Ethical Analysis & Reasoning Reasoning (2)
The goal of this course is to help you improve your ethical analysis and reasoning skills. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing ethical arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. In this course, you will discover how to apply the following questions to your job and everyday life. Why do we need ethics if we have laws to govern our behavior' Does the majority view determine what is ethical and what is not' Are feelings, desires, and preferences reliable ethical guides' Is it ever appropriate to criticize another individual's (or culture's) ethical judgment' Are people always responsible for their actions' Do human beings have a natural tendency to good, a natural tendency to evil' both' neither' Is there a single moral code that is binding on all people, at all times, and in all places'
MGMT 312 - Principles of Management (4)
This course explores the basic concepts and processes of management. Students will explore the functional roles and processes of planning, leading, organizing, and controlling comprising the manager role. Students develop skills related to the manager function that are required in today's competitive environment.
MKTG 300 - Marketing (4)
Theory, strategies and methods are foundational to the informed practice of marketing. Students investigate the importance of marketing to an organization or cause, the interrelationship of the difference phases of marketing, the marketing of goods versus services, analysis and identification of markets, pricing strategies and digital marketing tactics. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
PF 121 - Basic Learning Strategies (2)
This course introduces students to the Franklin University community and provides strategies for successful transition to and participation in that community. Topics include University resources and procedures, strategies for advancing communication skills, the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments, and the development of an academic and career plan.
SCIE 211 - Introduction to Scientific Analysis & Reasoning (4)
Introduction to Scientific Analysis and Reasoning is a four credit hour course consisting of three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of laboratory. This course is an introduction to critical thinking on statistical and scientific claims. The student will develop the critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate popular sources of (mis)information and to better understand and evaluate all sorts of scientific claims and arguments. The focus of the course is on students developing thoughtful and critical use of scientific information and research to be able to separate truth from deception and make decisions that affect their personal lives and roles as informed and engaged citizens.
COMM 150 - Interpersonal Communication (4)
By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
Exercise Science

The exercise science pathway prepares students for careers in personal training, coaching, training or self-employment and can be a starting ground for graduate programs in physical therapy, occupational therapy or nursing. When students transfer to Urbana, they have the opportunity to work in exercise science lab with aerobic fitness equipment, resistance training equipment and non-traditional exercise equipment.

COMM 201 - Theories of Interpersonal Communication (3)
This course studies the theory, nature, structure and role of communication in social interaction. Students explore all aspects of communication and develop skills in message generation.
EXS 125 - Designing Exercise Programs (3)
This course is an introduction to exercise program design. It will review general principles for designing exercise programs for apparently healthy individuals and individuals with physical disabilities. Strategies to improve exercise compliance and adherence will be included. Legal issues in the designing of exercise programs will be addressed.
EXS 140 - Foundations/Principles/History Sport (3)
Students become familiar with the nature, scope, history and philosophy of physical education; changing concepts of physical education; and scientific foundation of physical education.
HEA 152 - Wellness (3)
This course is designed to assist students when making intelligent decisions throughout life in order to achieve an optimal level of wellness. Emphasis will be placed on the wellness concept and its relationship to fitness, nutrition, self-esteem, and stress management. The areas of catastrophic diseases, aging process, and medical consumerism will be covered.
HEA 254 - Nutrition and Fitness (3)
Basic principles of nutrition as they apply to the general population in the maintenance of optimum health and to the competitive athlete with the objective of attaining optimum performance levels.
PHIL 208 - Ethics (3)
An introductory course in philosophy, with special emphasis on the classical alternative views of ethics and on their application to issues faced in everyday life. Some of these issues are the morality of war, euthanasia, behavior control, sexual morality, and morality in the business world.
PHIL 300 - Logic and Rhetoric (3)
An introduction to logic, designed to aid students in developing ways to distinguish correct from incorrect reasoning. Methods of critically evaluating arguments are considered. The course provides a methodological foundation for further study in philosophy, communications, the natural sciences, and the social sciences.
UNI 199 - University Seminar (2)
A mandatory course for entering full-time, degree-candidate students (may be waived for transfer students). This course is designed to help freshmen adjust to the University and develop strategies for success by providing a "support group" during this critical period of adjustment and examining problems common to the freshman experience. Students must pass the course or be required to repeat it.
Health Sciences

With projected job growth of 18 percent in the next 10 years – totaling 2.3 million jobs – health sciences focus on serving the acute care setting. Those who study health sciences may work in schools, hospitals, government agencies, in public health or administration, or for non-profit groups and serve in positions such as nursing, radiology, etc.

HIM 150 - Medical Terminology (2)
This course will introduce the foundations of medical terminology nomenclature and use. Emphasis will be on the fundamentals of prefix, word root, and suffix linkages to build a broad medical vocabulary.
PHIL 208 - Ethics (3)
An introductory course in philosophy, with special emphasis on the classical alternative views of ethics and on their application to issues faced in everyday life. Some of these issues are the morality of war, euthanasia, behavior control, sexual morality, and morality in the business world.
PHIL 300 - Logic and Rhetoric (3)
An introduction to logic, designed to aid students in developing ways to distinguish correct from incorrect reasoning. Methods of critically evaluating arguments are considered. The course provides a methodological foundation for further study in philosophy, communications, the natural sciences, and the social sciences.
PUBH 201 - Introduction to Public Health (4)
This course provides a basic introduction to public health concepts and practice by examining the philosophy, purpose, history, organization, functions, tools, activities and results of public health practice at the national, state, and community levels. The course also examines public health occupations and careers. Case studies and a variety of practice-related exercises serve as a basis for learner participation in practical public health problem-solving simulations.
SCIE 244 - Foundations of Anatomy & Physiology (4)
This course is designed for students interested in the allied healthcare professions and focuses on gross anatomy and the function of human organ systems and how they relate to one another. Students in this course will expand their medical terminology and scientific understanding of the physiology of the human body. In addition, students will gain an understanding of general pathology as it relates to the disruption of homeostasis. This course will include a one-hour lab component.
SCIE 254 - Health & Human Disease (4)
This course is designed for students pursuing allied health professions and provides an overview of human health and disease processes. Students will learn about common diseases and how they affect human health at cellular, organ, and systemic levels. Emphasis will be placed on the body as a system and how disease impacts the human body as a whole.
UNI 199 - University Seminar (2)
A mandatory course for entering full-time, degree-candidate students (may be waived for transfer students). This course is designed to help freshmen adjust to the University and develop strategies for success by providing a "support group" during this critical period of adjustment and examining problems common to the freshman experience. Students must pass the course or be required to repeat it.
Healthcare

Healthcare management careers are projected to grow significantly and that’s great news if you are looking to break into this exciting field, as you are more likely to find management opportunities available in a variety healthcare settings, including hospitals, long-term care facilities, physician practices, and more.

HCM 200 - Healthcare Management Terminology (2)
This course is a primer for individuals with little or no healthcare experience. The course covers the broad range of topics discussed in public health policy and in the healthcare setting. Terminology is associated with finance and reimbursement, managed care, quality and patient safety, government regulations, legal issues and accreditation.
HCM 300 - Healthcare Management (4)
This course provides students with an overview of concepts and issues related to healthcare leadership. It is generally a required course for any subsequent healthcare management courses. Through the examination of management topics and healthcare situations, the student will explore the skills and knowledge needed to be successful in a diverse healthcare environment. Topics include healthcare leadership, organizational design as it relates to the uniqueness of healthcare organizations, managing professionals, and diversity in the workplace.
HCM 340 - Community Health (4)
Declining reimbursement impacts the role healthcare organizations play in community health and disease prevention. This course focuses on specific strategies healthcare managers can use to benefit the health of communities. Topics include the role of healthcare stakeholders in promoting community health, connecting with the community, and community benefit standards.
HUMN 211 - Intro to Ethical Analysis & Reasoning Reasoning (2)
The goal of this course is to help you improve your ethical analysis and reasoning skills. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing ethical arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. In this course, you will discover how to apply the following questions to your job and everyday life. Why do we need ethics if we have laws to govern our behavior' Does the majority view determine what is ethical and what is not' Are feelings, desires, and preferences reliable ethical guides' Is it ever appropriate to criticize another individual's (or culture's) ethical judgment' Are people always responsible for their actions' Do human beings have a natural tendency to good, a natural tendency to evil' both' neither' Is there a single moral code that is binding on all people, at all times, and in all places'
MGMT 312 - Principles of Management (4)
This course explores the basic concepts and processes of management. Students will explore the functional roles and processes of planning, leading, organizing, and controlling comprising the manager role. Students develop skills related to the manager function that are required in today's competitive environment.
PF 121 - Basic Learning Strategies (2)
This course introduces students to the Franklin University community and provides strategies for successful transition to and participation in that community. Topics include University resources and procedures, strategies for advancing communication skills, the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments, and the development of an academic and career plan.
SCIE 211 - Introduction to Scientific Analysis & Reasoning (4)
Introduction to Scientific Analysis and Reasoning is a four credit hour course consisting of three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of laboratory. This course is an introduction to critical thinking on statistical and scientific claims. The student will develop the critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate popular sources of (mis)information and to better understand and evaluate all sorts of scientific claims and arguments. The focus of the course is on students developing thoughtful and critical use of scientific information and research to be able to separate truth from deception and make decisions that affect their personal lives and roles as informed and engaged citizens.
COMM 150 - Interpersonal Communication (4)
By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
Information Systems

Information systems students learn cutting-edge technology that combines both business and technology. The program builds on these skills for success in a field projected to grow 12 percent above the national average. Students are exposed to foundational knowledge of business as well as computer programming, cybersecurity and discipline of data and business analytics for a well-rounded education.

COMP 101 - Problem Solving With Computing (2)
Many organizations today utilize computers and information systems to store, organize, analyze, and summarize data to solve problems. As a result, computing is a tool that can benefit students in many different fields. At the heart of solving problems with computers is the study of structured thinking using algorithms. This course is designed for students with no prior programming experience and teaches the building blocks of algorithms, including variables, expressions, selection and repetition structures, functions and parameters, and array processing.
HUMN 211 - Intro to Ethical Analysis & Reasoning Reasoning (2)
The goal of this course is to help you improve your ethical analysis and reasoning skills. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing ethical arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. In this course, you will discover how to apply the following questions to your job and everyday life. Why do we need ethics if we have laws to govern our behavior' Does the majority view determine what is ethical and what is not' Are feelings, desires, and preferences reliable ethical guides' Is it ever appropriate to criticize another individual's (or culture's) ethical judgment' Are people always responsible for their actions' Do human beings have a natural tendency to good, a natural tendency to evil' both' neither' Is there a single moral code that is binding on all people, at all times, and in all places'
MATH 150 - Fundamental Algebra (4)
This course will address the outcomes of introductory and intermediate algebra. Topics include: basic algebraic properties, integers, simplifying and factoring polynomials, solving and graphing linear equations and inequalities, solving systems of equations in two variables, functions, rational expressions, quadratic and rational equations, absolute value, radicals, graphing systems of equations, and other selected topics. Applications will be emphasized, and numeric, algebraic, and graphical modes will be used. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
MATH 160 - College Algebra (4)
This course is designed to prepare students for Applied Calculus and Discrete Mathematics and to provide the mathematical background needed for the analytic reasoning used in other courses. Topics include functions and their graphs, including exponential and logarithmic functions; complex numbers; systems of equations and inequalities; matrices; basic principles of counting and probability; and other selected topics.
MIS 200 - Management Information Systems (4)
The purpose of this course is to provide the fundamentals associated with the management of information technology in a business enterprise. These fundamentals are business concepts in which the influence of information technology has caused change or brought about new concepts. Special emphasis will be placed on understanding the managerial issues that are relevant to usage of computers. The student will be given problems isolating these issues and will be asked to propose solutions with alternatives.
PF 121 - Basic Learning Strategies (2)
This course introduces students to the Franklin University community and provides strategies for successful transition to and participation in that community. Topics include University resources and procedures, strategies for advancing communication skills, the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments, and the development of an academic and career plan.
COMM 150 - Interpersonal Communication (4)
By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
WEBD 101 - Introduction to Web Page Construction (2)
This course covers the fundamental concepts necessary for the construction of web pages using the basic building blocks of Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (css). HTML and XHTML are covered in detail for building web pages using a web page development environment. The use of styling using css is introduced.
Information Technology

Students interested in working independently at a business to maintain established IT systems and keep them running can participate in the information technology pathway. The program focuses on administration of Windows Server, Unix, Linux, Oracle 10g, Firewalls, Cisco switches and routers, IP addressing and much more, developing an all-around IT professional prepared to build, connect and manage systems.

COMP 101 - Problem Solving With Computing (2)
Many organizations today utilize computers and information systems to store, organize, analyze, and summarize data to solve problems. As a result, computing is a tool that can benefit students in many different fields. At the heart of solving problems with computers is the study of structured thinking using algorithms. This course is designed for students with no prior programming experience and teaches the building blocks of algorithms, including variables, expressions, selection and repetition structures, functions and parameters, and array processing.
HUMN 211 - Intro to Ethical Analysis & Reasoning Reasoning (2)
The goal of this course is to help you improve your ethical analysis and reasoning skills. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing ethical arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. In this course, you will discover how to apply the following questions to your job and everyday life. Why do we need ethics if we have laws to govern our behavior' Does the majority view determine what is ethical and what is not' Are feelings, desires, and preferences reliable ethical guides' Is it ever appropriate to criticize another individual's (or culture's) ethical judgment' Are people always responsible for their actions' Do human beings have a natural tendency to good, a natural tendency to evil' both' neither' Is there a single moral code that is binding on all people, at all times, and in all places'
ISEC 200 - Cyber Security Fundamentals (2)
The Internet has changed dramatically; so have the activities that are dependent on it in some shape or form. Understanding the need for security, it's influence on people, businesses and society, as well as business drivers is critical. The course also covers malicious attacks, threats and vulnerabilities common to the world of security, as well as access controls, and methods to assess and respond to risks. Hands-on labs accompany the various concepts that are taught.
MATH 150 - Fundamental Algebra (4)
This course will address the outcomes of introductory and intermediate algebra. Topics include: basic algebraic properties, integers, simplifying and factoring polynomials, solving and graphing linear equations and inequalities, solving systems of equations in two variables, functions, rational expressions, quadratic and rational equations, absolute value, radicals, graphing systems of equations, and other selected topics. Applications will be emphasized, and numeric, algebraic, and graphical modes will be used. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
MATH 160 - College Algebra (4)
This course is designed to prepare students for Applied Calculus and Discrete Mathematics and to provide the mathematical background needed for the analytic reasoning used in other courses. Topics include functions and their graphs, including exponential and logarithmic functions; complex numbers; systems of equations and inequalities; matrices; basic principles of counting and probability; and other selected topics.
MIS 200 - Management Information Systems (4)
The purpose of this course is to provide the fundamentals associated with the management of information technology in a business enterprise. These fundamentals are business concepts in which the influence of information technology has caused change or brought about new concepts. Special emphasis will be placed on understanding the managerial issues that are relevant to usage of computers. The student will be given problems isolating these issues and will be asked to propose solutions with alternatives.
PF 121 - Basic Learning Strategies (2)
This course introduces students to the Franklin University community and provides strategies for successful transition to and participation in that community. Topics include University resources and procedures, strategies for advancing communication skills, the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments, and the development of an academic and career plan.
COMM 150 - Interpersonal Communication (4)
By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
WEBD 101 - Introduction to Web Page Construction (2)
This course covers the fundamental concepts necessary for the construction of web pages using the basic building blocks of Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (css). HTML and XHTML are covered in detail for building web pages using a web page development environment. The use of styling using css is introduced.
Operations & Supply Chain Management

Operations & supply chain management comprises the design, planning, execution, control and monitoring of operations and supply chain activities. This discipline focuses on areas including demand planning, quality management, procurement, supply chain optimization, strategic sourcing and more, building skills for a wide variety of logistical and management-related careers.

HUMN 211 - Intro to Ethical Analysis & Reasoning Reasoning (2)
The goal of this course is to help you improve your ethical analysis and reasoning skills. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing ethical arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. In this course, you will discover how to apply the following questions to your job and everyday life. Why do we need ethics if we have laws to govern our behavior' Does the majority view determine what is ethical and what is not' Are feelings, desires, and preferences reliable ethical guides' Is it ever appropriate to criticize another individual's (or culture's) ethical judgment' Are people always responsible for their actions' Do human beings have a natural tendency to good, a natural tendency to evil' both' neither' Is there a single moral code that is binding on all people, at all times, and in all places'
MATH 150 - Fundamental Algebra (4)
This course will address the outcomes of introductory and intermediate algebra. Topics include: basic algebraic properties, integers, simplifying and factoring polynomials, solving and graphing linear equations and inequalities, solving systems of equations in two variables, functions, rational expressions, quadratic and rational equations, absolute value, radicals, graphing systems of equations, and other selected topics. Applications will be emphasized, and numeric, algebraic, and graphical modes will be used. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
MGMT 312 - Principles of Management (4)
This course explores the basic concepts and processes of management. Students will explore the functional roles and processes of planning, leading, organizing, and controlling comprising the manager role. Students develop skills related to the manager function that are required in today's competitive environment.
OSCM 390 - Operations Management (4)
This course instructs students on how manufacturing and service operations contribute to organizational strategy. Concepts such as productivity, economies of scale, vertical and horizontal integration, and push vs. pull will be explained. Implications of applying "Green" policies to materials and processes will be explained.
PF 121 - Basic Learning Strategies (2)
This course introduces students to the Franklin University community and provides strategies for successful transition to and participation in that community. Topics include University resources and procedures, strategies for advancing communication skills, the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments, and the development of an academic and career plan.
SCIE 211 - Introduction to Scientific Analysis & Reasoning (4)
Introduction to Scientific Analysis and Reasoning is a four credit hour course consisting of three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of laboratory. This course is an introduction to critical thinking on statistical and scientific claims. The student will develop the critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate popular sources of (mis)information and to better understand and evaluate all sorts of scientific claims and arguments. The focus of the course is on students developing thoughtful and critical use of scientific information and research to be able to separate truth from deception and make decisions that affect their personal lives and roles as informed and engaged citizens.
COMM 150 - Interpersonal Communication (4)
By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
Social Sciences

This pathway provides students with the flexibility to select any number of specialization areas or disciplines from a group of academic disciplines. The program focuses on understanding and examining the structure, theoretical basis, evolution, and the interrelationships of societal institutions and organizations and how they influence and are influenced by human behavior. It prepares students for a number of opportunities in not only social sciences disciplines but also medicine, law, education and other professional programs.

ANTH 215 - CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4)
This course exposes students to the principles, concepts, research methods, and applications of cultural anthropology. Students will be introduced to the wide range of variation in social and institutional arrangements found historically and cross-culturally. From language to gender roles, from bases of social stratification to causes and consequences of conformity, from the simpler life in foraging societies to the seeming-chaos in modern post-industrial societies: students will examine the enormous variation in solutions to the requisites of social life.
HUMN 211 - Intro to Ethical Analysis & Reasoning Reasoning (2)
The goal of this course is to help you improve your ethical analysis and reasoning skills. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing ethical arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. In this course, you will discover how to apply the following questions to your job and everyday life. Why do we need ethics if we have laws to govern our behavior' Does the majority view determine what is ethical and what is not' Are feelings, desires, and preferences reliable ethical guides' Is it ever appropriate to criticize another individual's (or culture's) ethical judgment' Are people always responsible for their actions' Do human beings have a natural tendency to good, a natural tendency to evil' both' neither' Is there a single moral code that is binding on all people, at all times, and in all places'
PF 121 - Basic Learning Strategies (2)
This course introduces students to the Franklin University community and provides strategies for successful transition to and participation in that community. Topics include University resources and procedures, strategies for advancing communication skills, the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments, and the development of an academic and career plan.
PSYC 110 - General Psychology (4)
A survey of the various fields of study comprising modern scientific psychology. The course examines the theories, research findings, and applications in each of the major areas of psychology, with the goal of providing students with practice information they can apply to their personal and professional lives. The topic areas covered in the course include learning and memory, motivation and emotion, human development, theories of personality, psychopathology, and social behavior. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
SCIE 211 - Introduction to Scientific Analysis & Reasoning (4)
Introduction to Scientific Analysis and Reasoning is a four credit hour course consisting of three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of laboratory. This course is an introduction to critical thinking on statistical and scientific claims. The student will develop the critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate popular sources of (mis)information and to better understand and evaluate all sorts of scientific claims and arguments. The focus of the course is on students developing thoughtful and critical use of scientific information and research to be able to separate truth from deception and make decisions that affect their personal lives and roles as informed and engaged citizens.
SOCL 110 - Introduction to Sociology (4)
Sociology is the scientific study of group behavior - whether the groups are dyads, small groups, associations, bureaucracies, societies, publics, aggregates, social movements, or mobs, etc. This introductory course introduces the student to sociological principles and theoretical perspectives that facilitate understanding the norms, values, structure and process of the various types of groups into which people organize. The course focuses on applying the scientific method to studying social problems (e.g. poverty, crime, sexism and racism) and basic institutions (i.e. family, government, economy, religion, education). Students will develop their "sociological imagination" as a way of understanding what their lives are and can be in relation to the larger social forces at work in local, national, and international environments.
SOSC 205 - Issues in Social Sciences (2)
Issues in the Social Sciences facilitates exploration of current, sometimes controversial, social problems and solutions. The course takes an evidence-based approach to considering three broad subject areas in the field of social psychology - environmental sustainability, personal and public health and psychosocial aspects of the U.S. legal system. These topics are employed to exemplify how social science research informs public opinion and efficacious policies and interventions to promote positive social change. Class activities are designed to promote critical assessment of students' own opinions and the ability to present well-informed arguments.
COMM 150 - Interpersonal Communication (4)
By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
Sport Management

Sport management is where the business and sports worlds collide. The sports industry is big business, overseeing relationships between players, coaches, fans, owners, media, directors, operations and event management. Urbana prepares students for a successful career in sport management through courses in accounting, economics, marketing, law, communication, psychology, publicity, coaching and, of course, sports.

COMM 201 - Theories of Interpersonal Communication (3)
This course studies the theory, nature, structure and role of communication in social interaction. Students explore all aspects of communication and develop skills in message generation.
EXS 203 - Sport and Society (3)
Designed to look at sport and its role in society and the influence of society on sport in the areas of preparation for life, deviance in sports, coach's role, gender, race and ethnicity, class relations and social mobility, sports and the economy, sports and the media, sports and politics, sports and religion.
EXS 204 - Psychology of Coaching Sports (3)
This course is the study of the psychological and sociological aspects of coaching and participating in competitive athletics. It includes the study of visualization and mental imagery and its effects, and athletic performance.
HEA 152 - Wellness (3)
This course is designed to assist students when making intelligent decisions throughout life in order to achieve an optimal level of wellness. Emphasis will be placed on the wellness concept and its relationship to fitness, nutrition, self-esteem, and stress management. The areas of catastrophic diseases, aging process, and medical consumerism will be covered.
PHIL 208 - Ethics (3)
An introductory course in philosophy, with special emphasis on the classical alternative views of ethics and on their application to issues faced in everyday life. Some of these issues are the morality of war, euthanasia, behavior control, sexual morality, and morality in the business world.
PHIL 300 - Logic and Rhetoric (3)
An introduction to logic, designed to aid students in developing ways to distinguish correct from incorrect reasoning. Methods of critically evaluating arguments are considered. The course provides a methodological foundation for further study in philosophy, communications, the natural sciences, and the social sciences.
SPM 207 - Principles of Sport Management (3)
This course provides an introduction to the sports management field including career opportunities. Topics covered include knowledge and skills related to planning, organizing, directing, controlling, budgeting, and leading a sports related organization.
UNI 199 - University Seminar (2)
A mandatory course for entering full-time, degree-candidate students (may be waived for transfer students). This course is designed to help freshmen adjust to the University and develop strategies for success by providing a "support group" during this critical period of adjustment and examining problems common to the freshman experience. Students must pass the course or be required to repeat it.

Admission Process

The admission process varies slightly depending upon whether you attend a Franklin University/Urbana CCP partner high school. However all students are assigned an admissions advisor to guide you through the process. Parents and students can also count on our knowledgeable CCP team to provide help whenever you need it. 

Students who attend a partner high school

  1. Talk to your guidance counselor and fill out the letter of intent from your high school
  2. Complete the Fast App 

Application opens April 1; deadline May 17, 2018.

Students who attend a non-partner high school

  1. Talk to your guidance counselor and fill out the letter of intent from your high school
  2. Complete the Franklin University/Urbana application 
  3. Complete the application addendum

Application deadlines vary according to course availability. 

How CCP Works

Earn College Credit in High School

Take college-level courses at onsite at our Urbana University Branch Campus, online with Franklin University or at one of our partner high schools.

Transfer Credits To College

Choose a CCP pathway and transfer about 30 hours of coursework toward a bachelor’s or associate degree at Franklin University/Urbana.

Benefits of CCP

Courses 100% Online

Balance college coursework with high school and other commitments by taking online courses with Franklin University. With more than 25 years of experience in online education, Franklin’s intuitive, learner-centered approach sets you up for success.

Save Time & Money

Jump-start your college career by earning up to 30 hours of transferable college credit absolutely free. Last year, Ohio students completed more than 2,000 courses and earned more than 6,500 credits from Franklin University-Urbana CCP.

Quality Online Instruction

With more than 25 years of experience in online education, Franklin University has what you need to succeed. We put the needs of the learner first, with an engaging, intuitive online environment. 

Events

Franklin University/Urbana CCP hosts a variety of events to support our partner schools, our CCP families and prospective students. Check out our upcoming events to see if there’s something that interests you. 

Frequently Asked Questions

The Ohio Department of Higher Education FAQs

The Ohio Department of Higher Education provides College Credit Plus frequently asked questions for students, parents and administrators. 

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