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B.S. Applied Psychology

Put your mind to work with an applied psychology degree

In the world of business enterprise, high-performing individuals and teams are everything. Without them, competitive advantage is lost, profitability is diminished and morale declines. That's why more and more organizations are looking for coaches, advisors and counselors to help individuals realize their full potential. With a transfer-friendly B.S. Applied Psychology from Franklin, you can help people leverage their talents and achieve personal and corporate success. 

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On Site

Hands-On Experience

Gain experience with psychological assessment, coaching and instrumentation.

Tailored Program

Pick from a wide variety of exciting electives.

Invaluable Experience

Complete a hands-on practicum in your field.

Finish Faster

Transfer up to 94 previously earned college credits.

100% Online Classes

Earn your degree around your schedule.

Accredited Online University

Nearly 80% of our students take online courses.

Program Overview

Help others reach their maximum potential

Our Applied Psychology degree program focuses on human strengths as well as challenges, which allows you to enjoy a psychology-related career with a non-traditional focus. You’ll gain the foundational knowledge needed to help individuals overcome obstacles and achieve psychological adjustment as well as the executive coaching skills required to improve individual and team performance in a variety of organizational settings. A unique opportunity at the undergraduate level, you’ll even gain field experience as part of your applied psychology major. Rarely an option before master’s-level study, this hands-on aspect of the curriculum rounds out your learning and gives you a leg up on other bachelor’s degree graduates from the get go.  

Gain hands-on experience improving organizational performance

In Franklin’s Applied Psychology program, you’ll learn how to use assessment instruments, develop procedures for intervention planning, apply coaching methodologies to strengthen performance, participate in community mental health services, and evaluate and support organizational change programs.

The coursework allows you to gain hands-on experience with psychological instrumentation, including 360-degree appraisals, behavioral interview guides, and standardized questionnaires. You’ll also gain real-world experiential coaching and interviewing skills through peer-based coaching activities.

Tailor courses around a variety of rewarding career opportunities

The Applied Psychology degree program prepares graduates for employment in a variety of career positions: career development, human services, human resources consulting and management, organizational development, executive and management coaching, performance assessment, and employee relations. And if you’re interested in becoming a licensed counselor or psychologist, our Applied Psychology Major provides an excellent foundation for graduate studies.

In addition to broadening your skill set and opening up new career opportunities, the Applied Psychology Major allows you to focus coursework around career-specific interests by offering a rich set of electives in these areas: Applied Management, Criminal Justice Administration, Healthcare Management, Human Resources Management, Management, Marketing, Public Relations, Public Safety Management, or Social and Behavioral Science.

Finish faster when you transfer earned credits

Franklin’s Applied Psychology degree program is transfer-friendly, too, which means you may be able to take fewer classes and finish your degree faster. And if you’ve already earned credits in psychology, management and business, or have experience in human service professions -- such as chemical dependency or child development -- you’ll be able to finish your undergraduate education while still maintaining the continuity of your course of study.

Earn your degree from a university built for busy adults

Earn your degree on your terms by taking classes 100% online or pursue available coursework at one of our Midwest locations. Regionally accredited and nonprofit, Franklin was built from the ground-up to satisfy the needs of adult learners. Our seamless transfer process and team of academic advisors will help ease your transition to becoming a student, while our flexible course schedules help to balance your education with work, family, and life. Get started on your future today.

*Source information provided by Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI)

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Curriculum & Course Descriptions

120 Semester Hours
Fundamental General Education Core (24 hours)
English Composition (3 hours)

Choose a minimum of 3 semester hours from:

WRIT 120 - COLLEGE WRITING (4)
In this course, students acquire the writing competence necessary for conducting and presenting research. A variety of assignments, beginning with personal reflections, build upon one another, as students develop ideas that respond to, critique, and synthesize the positions of others. Students systematize and organize knowledge in ways that will help them in all of their courses. The course also emphasizes the elements of good writing style, appropriate grammar and mechanics, clarity of language, and logical and cohesive development. It culminates in submission of a documented research paper.

*If the course does not have a research paper component, WRIT 130 Research Paper, two semester credits, is also required.

Mathematics (3 hours)

Choose a minimum of three semester hours from:
(At least one mathematics or statistics course beyond the level of intermediate algebra)

MATH 160 - COLLEGE ALGEBRA (4)
This course is designed to prepare students for Applied Calculus and Discrete Mathematics and to provide the mathematical background needed for the analytic reasoning used in other courses. Topics include functions and their graphs, including exponential and logarithmic functions; complex numbers; systems of equations and inequalities; matrices; basic principles of counting and probability; and other selected topics.
MATH 180 - APPLIED CALCULUS (4)
This course is designed to meet the needs of the Computer Science Program. Topics include limits, the derivative, rules for differentiation, graphing strategy, optimization problems, differentials, implicit differentiation, related rates, exponential and logarithmic functions, antiderivatives, definite integrals, areas, and methods of integration. Applications are emphasized.
MATH 210 - FINITE MATHEMATICS (4)
This course includes such topics as matrices, solutions of simultaneous linear equations using matrix methods, graphic and simplex solutions to linear programming problems, set theory, counting problems (including permutations and combinations), probability theory (including Bayes' theorem), Markov chains, and the mathematics of finance. Game theory may be discussed if time permits. Applications in business, economics, and management are emphasized. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
MATH 215 - STATISTICAL CONCEPTS (4)
This course introduces the student to statistics with business applications. The course covers both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics included are: measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion; graphical displays of data; linear regression; basic probability concepts; binomial and normal probability distributions; confidence intervals; and hypothesis testing. These topics will be covered using a basic knowledge of algebra and Microsoft Excel. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
MATH 220 - BUSINESS CALCULUS (4)
This course may not be taken by students who previously received calculus credit. Topics include limits, the derivative, rules for differentiation, graphing strategy, optimization problems, differentials, implicit differentiation, related rates, exponential and logarithmic functions, antiderivatives, definite integrals, areas, and methods of integration. Applications in business, economics, and management are emphasized. This course should be taken as soon as possible after acquiring the necessary algebra skills and concepts, preferably within the first 60 hours of any degree program.

Choose MATH 150 Fundamental Algebra as the prerequisite. Can count as a general education or University elective.

Sciences (6 hours)

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

SCIE 210 - UNDERSTANDING SCIENCE: PRINCIPLES, PRACTICE, & THEORY (2)
Understanding Science: Principles, Practice & Theory is a two credit hour course that introduces students to the major themes, processes, and methods common to all scientific disciplines. Students will develop critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate all kinds of phenomena, scientific, pseudoscientific, and other. The focus is on the nature of science so students will develop an understanding of how science works and develop an appreciation for the process by which we gain scientific knowledge.
SCIE 211 - INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC ANALYSIS & REASONING (4)
Introduction to Scientific Analysis and Reasoning is a four credit hour course consisting of three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of laboratory. This course is an introduction to critical thinking on statistical and scientific claims. The student will develop the critical thinking skills necessary to analyze and evaluate popular sources of (mis)information and to better understand and evaluate all sorts of scientific claims and arguments. The focus of the course is on students developing thoughtful and critical use of scientific information and research to be able to separate truth from deception and make decisions that affect their personal lives and roles as informed and engaged citizens.

*Two science courses, with one having a laboratory component.

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

PSYC 110 - GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY (4)
A survey of the various fields of study comprising modern scientific psychology. The course examines the theories, research findings, and applications in each of the major areas of psychology, with the goal of providing students with practice information they can apply to their personal and professional lives. The topic areas covered in the course include learning and memory, motivation and emotion, human development, theories of personality, psychopathology, and social behavior. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
  • Choose additional coursework from the Anthropology, Economics, or Sociology disciplines, or PUAD 295 American Government in Action.

*The six semester hours must come from at least two different disciplines

Arts and Humanities (6 hours)

Choose a minimum of 6 semester hours from:

HUMN 210 - INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC & CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS (2)
The goal of this course is to help you improve as a critical, logical thinker. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. You will discover how to apply these valuable skills to your studies and everyday life, learning how to overcome obstacles to critical thinking, and how to avoid being deceived by means of misleading reasoning.
HUMN 211 - INTRO TO ETHICAL ANALYSIS AND REASONING (2)
The goal of this course is to help you improve your ethical analysis and reasoning skills. You will be introduced to the art of formulating and assessing ethical arguments according to the standards of logical thinking and critical analysis. In this course, you will discover how to apply the following questions to your job and everyday life. Why do we need ethics if we have laws to govern our behavior' Does the majority view determine what is ethical and what is not' Are feelings, desires, and preferences reliable ethical guides' Is it ever appropriate to criticize another individual's (or culture's) ethical judgment' Are people always responsible for their actions' Do human beings have a natural tendency to good, a natural tendency to evil' both' neither' Is there a single moral code that is binding on all people, at all times, and in all places'
HUMN 218 - WORLD RELIGIONS (4)
A comparative study of the founders, sacred writings, beliefs and practices of some of the major world religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Islam, Judaism and Christianity. This course enables the student to study and compare the leading religions of the world in light of their historical and cultural backgrounds. Students will be encouraged to explore faith traditions other than their own. Common themes across religions, spiritual practice, and current related cultural and political issues will also be considered.
HUMN 232 - INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE (4)
In this course, students will analyze works from the three major literary genres: poetry, drama, and fiction. Students will become familiar with standard vocabulary and approaches specific to the field of literary criticism and consider the importance of literature in contemporary society. The goal of this course is to encourage students to read for pleasure (engage with the text on an emotional level) while also moving towards a more objective consideration of literature by introducing the fundamentals of close reading and literary analysis.
HUMN 240 - POPULAR CULTURE (4)
An introductory course that examines basic concepts in popular culture studies and the role popular arts and artifacts play in shaping cultural values. The course covers basic theories and approaches to topics like best sellers, popular music, popular art forms, cultural heroes from the sports and entertainment worlds and other popular phenomena.
HUMN 246 - FILM APPRECIATION (4)
This course is an introduction to the art of film intended to enable students to become more knowledgeable, appreciative and critical viewers. The course covers the major areas of film: narrative, documentary, animated and experimental. While some film history is covered, this course emphasizes understanding key elements in the filmmaking process: scripting, filming, editing, acting, directing, promoting and distributing. Students will be required to view and write critical reviews of films screened both in and out of class. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
Additional General Education Requirements (12 hours)
COMM 315 - COMMUNICATION ETHICS (4)
This course examines the strategies involved in effective, ethical communication in professional contexts. Students examine principles of ethical organizational communication and the temporal/cultural/social forces behind those principles, as well as apply reasoning and critical thinking in individual and group assignments. Comparing values and perspectives from diverse cultures, students will respond to cases in an intercultural professional environment. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
PF 321 - LEARNING STRATEGIES (2)
This course prepares students to be successful lifelong learners both academically and in their chosen careers. Franklin courses require a high level of self-directed learning and focus on skills required in the workplace and the classroom that are easily transferable between the two environments. The course includes strategies for advancing communication skills, including the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments. The assignments and activities in the course are created to closely simulate teamwork found in the workplace.
COMM 150 - INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION (4)
By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and public speaking. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
OR SPCH 100 - SPEECH COMMUNICATION (4)
A basic public speaking course intended to improve the student's ability to think critically and to communicate orally. Theory and practice are provided in various speaking situations. Each student is required to speak before an audience, but class work also involves reading, gathering and organizing information, writing and listening.
  • General Education Electives (2)

Professional Core (28 hours)
Select 24 hours from the following subject areas:

Acceptable coursework includes selections from Accounting, Anthropology, Business Administration, Business Forensics, Communication, Economics, Emergency Management & Homeland Security, Finance, Healthcare, Human Resources Management, Information Systems, Management, Marketing, Operations & Supply Chain Management, Organizational Development, Political Science, Psychology, Public Relations, Public Safety Management, Social Science, or Sociology. Other courses may be accepted upon review by the Program Chair.

WRIT 220 - RESEARCH WRITING: EXPLORING PROFESSIONAL IDENTITIES (4)
This is an intermediate course focusing on the composition of research papers. Students in this course prepare to be active participants in professional discourse communities by examining and practicing the writing conventions associated with their own fields of study and work. By calling attention to the conventions of disciplinary writing, the course also prepares students for upper-division college writing and the special conventions of advanced academic discourse. Course activities include three extended research papers, semi-formal writing addressing interdisciplinary communication, and readings fostering critical engagement with disciplinary conversations.
OR WRIT 320 - BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WRITING (4)
This is an advanced composition course that focuses on writing for business and professional purposes. Students will review the writing conventions commonly expected within business and professional environments, as well as strategies for analyzing rhetorical situations within those environments. Coursework includes analysis, revision, and research exercises, as well as substantial practice in composing business correspondence. The final project is an extensive, researched business proposal developed in stages and presented to the class. Students will be encouraged to relate course materials to their major programs and workplace experiences.
University Electives (28 hours)

Any undergraduate courses offered by the University except developmental education courses.

Major Area (28 hours)
COMM 335 - COMMUNICATION IN GROUPS AND TEAMS (4)
The course examines current theories and best practices of working collaboratively in professional contexts. Students apply these concepts to analyze their own work experience, generating strategies for how to improve their performance in work groups. Students will learn basic project management skills and work in online virtual teams to complete a final communication project.
OR SOCL 210 - PUBLIC SOCIOLOGY (4)
Course materials will introduce students to the typical introductory sociological concepts and theories which prepare students to begin seeing how their socio-historical contexts help to shape who they are and to shape the larger communities in which they live. Innovative aspects of this course help students to reflect on the deeper and more personal question pertaining to what kinds of communities they want to live in and what roles they are willing to play in bringing those communities to fruition.
PSYC 310 - THE PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT (4)
This psychology based course provides evidenced-based information and application strategies for improving personal and professional adjustment and effectiveness. The purpose of this course is to enable students to address and utilize more of their inherent potential. Students will use a self-coaching model to apply principles and methods taken from a variety of current sources, i.e. emotional and social intelligence, multiple intelligences, and positive psychology and executive coaching. The primary course outcome will be a plan for effecting improved adjustment and performance in students' personal and professional lives.
PSYC 315 - APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY: THEORY TO PRACTICE (4)
This course is an exploration of the expanding field of Applied Psychology. The framework of inquiry incorporates an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the current state of the field and its career possibilities. The principal focus is on applying scientific and humanistic perspectives derived from psychology to individual, social, and institutional opportunities. Please note: A book fee will be included in your tuition charges for required course materials. Please see http://www.franklin.edu/financial-aid/tuition-fees /e-textbooks for specific charges.
PSYC 325 - COACHING IN ORGANIZATIONS (4)
This course is designed to introduce students to the use of coaching skills for improving the adjustment and performance of individuals in an organizational setting. Topics to be covered include: the scope of coaching practice, optimal practitioner characteristics, benefits for coaches, related organizational dynamics, and coaching interventions and resources. This course also includes an emphasis on experimental learning through coaching practice activities.
OR SOCL 355 - COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH (4)
This course explores the social context of mental health treatment and delivery of mental health care. The delivery of mental health care is rife with public policy debates stemming from the diversity of opinion among policy makers, treatment specialists, consumers of mental health care and their families, for-profit entities such as pharmaceutical companies, and the public. Debates that highlight this course include but are not limited to the following: the proper role of medication in mental health care, balancing patients' rights with the desire for public safety, influence of the Affordable Care Act on mental health diagnosis and treatment, and differences between mental health care in Ohio and that found in other locales.
PSYC 420 - ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION IN ORGANIZATIONS (4)
This course explores the use of psychological instrumentation as a means for improving individual and organizational performance. The emphasis is on the assessment of strengths and positive psychological functioning. Students will become acquainted with various psychological instruments including their selection, construction, and administration. Additionally, students will gain experience with the interpretation and delivery of instrument results and their translation into individual and organizational improvement interventions.
PSYC 495 - APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY/SOC SCI CAPSTONE (4)
This course provides a culminating, integrative experience for all Applied Psychology and Social Science majors. The purpose is to provide an opportunity for studentsto demonstrate their mastery of the learning outcomes associated with the major. Students will self-select a practicum experience that can be completed within the duration of the course that will provide evidence of their subject matter learning as well as provide a benefit to themselves and a participating organization.
OR SOSC 495 - APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY/SOCIAL SCIENCE PRACT (4)
This course provides a culminating, integrative experience for all Applied Psychology and Social Sciences majors. The purpose is to provide an opportunity for students to demonstrate their mastery of the learning outcomes associated with the major. Students will self-select a capstone project that can be completed within the duration of the course that will provide evidence of their subject matter learning as well as provide a benefit to themselves and a participating organization.
SOCL 335 - APPLIED RESEARCH METHODS (4)
Applied Research Methods introduces students to foundational issues of social scientific research - that is, research entailing the application of the scientific method to the study of human behavior. Students will examine the strengths and weaknesses of major quantitative and qualitative data collection techniques as well as the processes involved in planning and executing such projects and the standards of evaluating the quality of data.
Additional Requirements

All students are required to pass College Writing (WRIT 120), either Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121) or Learning Strategies (PF 321) and either Speech Communication (SPCH 100) or Interpersonal Communication (COMM 150) prior to enrolling in any other course at the 200 level or above. Either PF 121 or PF 321 must be taken prior to the first BLF course, or it may be taken concurrently with the first 15-week BLF course. Students who enroll at Franklin with 30 or fewer hours of transfer credit are required to pass Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121) in place of Learning Strategies (PF 321). Students must also meet the University algebra competency requirement.

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Program Details

Career Opportunities

Executive Coach

Executive Coaches use one-on-one coaching to help executives develop and refine leadership skills.

Career Development Specialist

Career Development Specialists develop and administer programs to help leaders and staff plan and attain their career goals.

Employee Relations Representative

Employee Relations Representatives promote employee welfare by mediating issues, resolving workplace problems, and assisting in the daily administration of human resources tasks.

Interpersonal Effectiveness Trainer

Interpersonal Effectiveness Trainers coach employees in improving interpersonal communications through self-awareness training and behavior modification.

Training and Development Specialists

Training and Development Specialists create, implement, and evaluate employee training programs, assisting with new hire orientation, job transitions, and organizational change management.

Human Services Counselor

Human Services Counselors represent and support a constituency of people during resolution of a problem or crisis, providing life-skills instruction, and connecting others to valuable resources and assistance.

Employment Outlook

All Occupations

2015
1,900,000 jobs
2025
2,100,000 jobs


Source information provided by Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) - June 2016

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